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Full text of "Bulletin of Armstrong College"

si 



Digitized by tlie Internet Arciiive 

in 2012 witii funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/bulletin6470arms 



1964-65 



ILLETIN ARMSTRONG 

COLLEGE 



SAVANNAH 




SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



On June 10, 1964, the Regents of the University System of Georgia changed the status of 
Armstrong? College from junior to senior level. This requires the following changes in the 
schedule of fees: 


Page 21 


Application Fee 10.00 


Page 26 


Application Fee 10.00 


Page 26 


Matriculation Fee 

The Matriculation Fee for students registering for the normal course load of 
fifteen hours is $60.00. Special students (those carrying less than 12 credit 
hours in a quarter) will pay at the rate of $5.00 per quarter houi in Matricula- 
tion Fee. 


Page 26 


Out of State Tuition 

Non-Residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $100.00 per quarter in addition to all 
regular fees. Special students (those carrying less than 12 credit hours in a 
quarter) who are not legal residents of the State of Georgia will pay at the rate 
of S8.00 per quarter hour Out-of-State Fee in addition to all regular fees. 


Page 28 


Summary of Fees 

Matriculation, per quarter 60.00 

Student Activity Fee, per quarter 10.00 


TOTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS 70.00 




Out-of-State Tuition, per quarter 100.00 


TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS 170.00 
Matriculation, Special Students, per quarter hour 5.00 
Non-Resident Tuition, Special Students, per quarter hour 

(in addition to Matriculation Fee) 8.00 




8C160 

1961-1963 



SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING 



BULLETIN OF 

Armstrong College 

of Savannah 
Savannah, Georgia 

A Unit of the University System 
of Georgia 




Membership in 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 

Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 

VOLUME XXIX NUMBER 4 



1 964 




CALENDAR 


1 964 


APRIL 1 


JULY 1 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T 

1 2 

5 6 7 8 9 

12 13 14 15 16 

19 20 21 22 23 

26 27 28 29 30 

MAY 


F 

3 

10 

17 
24 


s 

4 
11 
18 
25 


S 

5 

12 
19 
26 


M T W T F 

1 2 3 

6 7 8 9 10 

13 14 15 16 17 

20 21 22 23 24 

27 *28 29''30~31 


S 
4 
11 
18 
25 


S 

4 
11 
18 
25 


M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

5 6 7 8 9 10 

12 13 14 15 16 17 

19 20 21 22 23 24 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T 

3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 
17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 
31 


F 

1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


S 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


S 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


M T W T F 

3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 
17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 
31 


S 

1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


S 
1 
8 

15 

22 
29 


M T W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 7 

9 10 11 12 13 14 

16 17 18 19 20 21 

23 24 25 26 27 28 

30 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T 

12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 


F 
5 

12 
19 
26 


S 

6 

13 

20 

27 


S 

6 
13 
20 

27 


M T W T F 

12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 


S 
5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

7 8 9 10 11 12 

14 15 16 17 18 19 

21 22 23 24 25 26 

28 29 30 31 


1 965 




CALENDAR 


1 965 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


S M T W T F 

1 
3 4 5 6 7 8 
10 11 12 13 14 15 
17 18 19 20 21 22 
24 25 26 27 28 29 
31 

FEBRUARY 


9 

9 
16 
23 
30 


S 

4 
11 
18 
25 


M T W T F 

1 2 

5 6 7 8 9 

12 13 14 15 16 

19 20 21 22 23 

26 27 28 29 30 


S 
3 
10 
17 
24 


S 

4 
11 
18 

25 


M T \V T F S 

1 2 3 

5 6 7 8 9 10 

12 13 14 15 16 17 

19 20 21 22 23 24 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


MA\' 


AUGUST 


S M T W T 

12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 


F 
5 

12 
19 
26 


S 
6 
13 
20 
27 


S 

2 
9 

16 
23 

30 


M T \V T F 

3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 
17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 
31 


S 
1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


S 

1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


M T W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 7 

9 10 11 12 13 1-1 

16 17 18 19 20 21 

23 24 25 26 27 28 

30 31 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T 

12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 31 


F 
5 

12 
19 
26 


S 

6 

13 

20 

27 


S_ 

6 
13 
20 

27 


M T W T F 

1 2 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 


S 
5 

12 
19 
26 


S_ 

5 
12 
19 
26 


M T \V T F S 

12 3 4 

6 7 8 9 10 11 

13 14 15 16 17 18 

20 21 22 23 24 25 

27 28 29 30 
















i 



CALENDAR FOR 1964 - 1965 



May 1: 

Mav 19; 

Jiuu' 9: 
June 10; 
June 12: 
June 19; 
July 6: 
July 15. 17 
August 6-7: 



May 1 : 
August 1 : 
September 16; 

September 17: 



September 18: 



September 21 
September 23 
September 25 
Dctober 26: 
S'ovember 2-6 



SUMMKR SKSSION, 1964 

Last day to file all papers of Appli( ation for A(iinissi(Mi 

for preferred registration st.it us 
Last day to file all papers of Application for Admission 

(including CEEB SAT scores) 
Registration 
Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 
Last day to change classes 
Mid-term reports due 
Pre-registration 
Examinations 



FALL QUARTER, 1964 



Last day to file all papers of Application for Admission 

for preferred registration status 
Last day to file all papers of Application for Admission 

(including CEEB SAT scores) 
Freshman Orientation (9:00 a.m., Jenkins Hall Audi- 
torium) 
Advisement for former students (9:00 a.m. -12:00 

p.m.) 
Advisement for freshmen (1:30 p.m. - 4.30 p.m.) 
Advisement and registration for former students 

Students who have pre-registered 9:00 a.m. - 
10:00 a.m. 

Students who have not pre-registered whose last 
names begin with the indicated letters will be ad- 
vised and registered : 

H through P 10:00 a.m. -11:00 a.m. 
Q through Z 2:00 p.m.- 3:00 p.m. 

A through G 3:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m. 

Registration for freshmen with preferred registration 
status ("red tag") 

Students whose last names begin with the letters 
A through K 9:00 a.m.- 10:00 a.m. 

L through Z 10:00 a.m. -11:00 a.m. 
Registration and advisement for all other new students 
Students whose last names begin with the letters 
A through K 2:00 p.m.- 3:00 p.m. 

L through Z 3:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m. 

Registration and advisement for all students who did 

not register earlier 6:00 p.m.- 8:00 p.m 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 
Last day to change classes 
Mid-term reports due 
Pre-registration 



FALL QUARTER, 1964 



X 



(Acmncr 



November 26-29 
November 30: 
December 7-9: 



Assembly for installation of student officers (12:30 

p.m., Jenkins Hall .Auditorium) 
Thanksgiving Holidays 

Ga. and U.S. history and government test 
Examinations 



»ecemDer 



14: 



January 4 : 
January 5 : 
January 7 : 
January 1 1 : 
February 8: 
February 15-19: 
March 8: 
March 16-18: 



WINTER QUARTER, 1965 



Last day to file all papers of .Application for .Admission 

(including CEEB S.AT scores) 
Registration 
Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 
Last day to change classes 
Mid-term reports due 
Pre-registration 

Ga. and U.S. history and government test 
Examinations 



SPRING QUARTER, 1965 



March 1 : 

March 24: 
March 25 
March 29: 
March 30: 
April 16: 
May 3: 
May 10: 
May 10-14: 
May 26 
June 2, 3, 4 
June 7: 



Last day to file all papers of Application for .Admission 

(including CEEB SAT scores) 
Registration 
Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 
Last day to change classes 
Holiday 

Mid-term reports due 

Ga. and U.S. history and government test 
Pre-registration 
Honors Day Assembly 
Examinations 
Graduation 



SUMMER SESSION, 1965 



May 1: 

June 10: 
June 1 1 : 
June 14: 
June 16: 
July 5: 
July 14-18: 
August 9-10 



Last day to file all papers of .Application for Admission 

for preferred registration status 
Registration 
Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 
Last day to change classes 
Mid-term reports due 
Pre-registration 
Examinations 



I 



H<»«jriits, I iii\rrsily Syslnii of (rror<:ia 

Jl 1 \\.isliii»i;toii Strci't. S.W. Touith I'looi 
A ILW I.\ 



District Rtiitnt 

State at Large- James A. Dunlap 

(February 19.1960 - January 1. 1967) 
State at LartieT. Hiram Stanle> 

(January Ki. 1964 -January 1. 1971) 
State at Larue Rov \'. Harris 

(February 19. 1960 - January \, 1967) 
State at Large- Dr. John A. Bell. Jr. 

(January 1, 1963 -January 1. 1970) 
State at Large — Carev Williams 

(January 1. 1962 -January 1. 1969) 
First .-\nton F. Solms. Jr. 

(January L 1962 - January- 1, 1969) 
Second — John \. Spooncr 

(January 1. 1961 -January 1. 1968) 
Third — Howard H. Callawav 

(January 1, 1958 -January 1, 1965) 
Fourth — James C. Owen. Jr. 

(January 1, 1963 -January 1. 1970) 
Fifth — Jesse Draper 

(January 1, 1961 -January 1, 1968) 
Sixth — G. L. Dickens. Jr 

(January 13,1964 - January 1, 1971) 
Seventh — Ernest L. Wright - 

(February 6, 1959 -January 1, 1966) 
Eighth — John \V. Langdale 

(January 13, 1964 -January 1, 1971) 
Ninth — Morris M. Brvan. Jr 

(February 3, 1959 -January 1, 1966) 
Tenth— W. Roscoe Coleman 

(January 1, 1958 -January 1. 1965) 



Address 
Gainesville 

Golumbus 

.Augusta 

Dublin 

Greensboro 

Savannah 

Donalsonville 

Pine Mountain 

Griffin 

Atlanta 

Milledgeville 

Rome 

Valdosta 

Jefferson 

Augusta 



Officers and Staff of the Board of Regents 



Chairman 
Vice Chairman 

Chancellor 

Vice Chancellor 

* Assistant to Chancellor 
Director Plant & Business Operator 
Executive Secretary 
Treasurer 

Director Testing & Guidance 

Associate Director Testing & Guidance 



James A. Dunlap 

Morris M. Bryan, Jr. 

Harmon W. Caldwell 

S. Walter Martin 

John E. Sims 

J. H. Dewberry 

L. R. Siebert 

James A. Blissit 

John R. Hills 

Harrv S. Downs 



*On leave. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



THE ARMSTRONG COLLEGE COMMISSION 

The Commission controls certain endowment funds and scholar- 
ship funds which have been contributed by local citizens over a period 
of years. It serves also in an advisoiy capacity to the college. 

Dr. Irmng Victor Chairman 

Arthur I. Jeffords Vice-Chairman 

Jl'le C. Rossiter Secretary and Treasurer 

APPOINTIVE EX-OFFICIO 

Dr. Irving Victor, Chairman Mayor Malcolm Maclean 
Mr. Arthur I. Jeffords, Judge Robert F. Lovett 

Vice-Chairman Dr. Thord Marshall, 

Mr. Grady L. Dickey Superintendent, Board of 

Mr. Fr.\nk B.\rragan, Jr. Education, Chatham County 

Mr. Fr.\nk Hill Dr. Darnell Brawner, 

Mr. John F. M. Ranitz, Jr. President, Board of Education 

Mr. William Schandolph^ 
President, Chamber of 
Commerce 



OFFICE OF the PRESIDENT 

Henry L. Ashmore, B.A.E.. M.A.E., D.Ed., University of Florida 

President 

Marjorie a. Mosley, A. A., Armstrong College Administrati: , 

Assistant and Secretary to the Preside} 



office of the academic dean 

Joseph I. Killorin, A.B., St. John's College; M.A., Columbia 

University Academic Dean 

Elizabeth Howard, A. A.. Armstrong College Secretary 



office of the dean of students 

James H.\rry Persse. B.F.A., University of Georgia: Master of Music, 

Florida State University Dean of Students 

(On leave of absence 1964-1965) 



ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Jack H. Padgkm, A.I^.. Woltoid College; M.A., Unixcisity of North 

Carolina .. Rit^i^har 

Virginia M. Ari:\'. H.A., Cuiia\\l)a (lollcgc Assistant to the Registrar 
Minnie McG. Campbkll \^etcrans' Aj fairs Officer 

Bertis Jones Secretary to the Registrar 

Nellie Hankins Schmidt, B.A., Mary Baldwin College Admissions 

Officer and Assistant Registrar 
Sarah Floyd Tuten Assistant to the Admissions Officer 

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 
AND ALUMNI 

Mary H. Strong, A.B.. University of West Virginia Director 

Helen Meighen Secretary 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER 

JiLE C. Rossiter, a. a., Armstrong College Comptroller 

Norma Jean Calloway Secretary 

Corinne H. McGee .Bookkeeper 

Mary Elizabeth Poi'nd . Manager, Student Center and Book Store 

Ira J. Ryan Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Joe McNeely, Jr Assistant 

Mary Kearney P.B.X. Operator 

Library 

Regina Yoast, B.A. Texas Christian University; B.S. in Library Sci- 
ence, Columbia University Librarian 

Phyllis Cartwright, B.M., University of Miami; M.S., Florida State 
University Catalog Librarian 

Eleanor Salter, B.S., Georgia Southern College ...Assistant to 

the Librarian 

Elizabeth Bonnell LeGette Assistant to the Catalog Librarian 

Student Personnel Services 

Manning Hiers, M.A., University of South Carolina Director and 

Counsellor 
Dorothy Thompson^ M.A., Northwestern University Counsellor 
Frances Mull, B.A., Oglethorpe University ...Secretary 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



THE FACULTY 

Josephine Amari^ A.B., G.S.W.C.; M.A., Columbia University; Di- 
ploma, Sorbonne, Paris, France 

Assistant Professor of English, French 

M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B., M.A., Baylor University; Graduate 
Studv, Cambridge University, C'olumbia University, University of 
North Carolina 

Professor of English 

*Wesley W. Apple, B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Mathematics 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., University 
of Georgia; Graduate Study, Emory University 

Chairman, History and Political Science Department 
Professor of History 

*J. Fred Beverly, A.B., M.A., Mercer University 

Instructor in English, Business Administration 

Brazil Ransom Bradford, A.B., M.A., Emory University: Graduate 
Study, Institute of Historical Research. University of London 

Assistant Professor of English, History 

Frank Brimelow, A.R.T.C.S., Royal College of Advanced Tech- 
nology, Salford, England; M.S., Vanderbilt University 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Phyllis Cartwright, B.M., University of Miami: M.S., Florida State 
University 

Catalog Librarian 

William E. Coyle, A.B., Emory University; M.A., Georgetown Uni- 
versity 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science 

^Charlotte Crittenden, B.S., M.Ed.. Georgia Southern College 
Instructor in English 

Leslie B. Davenport, Jr., B.S., College of Charleston; M.S., Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., the University of Georgia 
Chairman, Biology Department 
Professor of Biology 



*Part-tinie Instructor. 



I 



ADMINISTRATION 



John Kknnki h Davidson, B.S., M.A., LniNcisity of Georgia 
As.\i.statU Profi'ssor of Socioloi^y 

Lamar \V. Davis, B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina; Certified 
Public Accountant 

Chairman, Business Administration Department 
Professor of Business Administration 

John L. M. desIslets, Col. (Ret.), B.S., United States Military 
Academy 

Chairman, Physics Department 
Professor of Physics 

*Orlando a. Diaz, H.S., M.Ed., Phillips University 
Instructor in Spanish 

*RossiTER C. DiRFEE, A.B., M.A., Stanford University 
Instructor in English 

^Hartley Barrett Eckerson, S.S., M.S., University of Tennessee 
Instructor in Home Economics 

Jack B. P'owler, A.B., University of Georgia; M.A., George Peabody 
College 

Associate Professor of English 

*Prentice Lay Gott, B.S. and M.A., Western Kentucky State Col- 
lege; Doctor of Education, George Peabody College for Teachers 

Instructor in Geography 

Joseph Green^ A.B., Birmingham-Southern; M.A., Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity; Graduate Study, Florida State University 
Associate Professor of English 

Richard Haunton, A.B. and M.A., Indiana University; Graduate 
Study, Emory University 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science 

^Reginald C. Haupt, Jr., L.L.B., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Business Administration 

J. Manning Hiers, A.B., Duke University; M.A., University of South 
Carolina 

Director, Student Personnel Services 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 



Tart-time Instructor. 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



^Bernard A. Hirsiirerg, A.B., A.M., University of Michigan 
Instructor in Education 

S. Hannah Holleman, B.S., M.S., Clemson College 

Assistant Professor of Botany and Biology 

*Stanlev Karsman^ L.L.B., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Business Administration 

*JosEPH B. Kreinen, B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Duquesne 
University; Special Studies, University of Odessa, Russia 
Instructor in German and Russian 

■'^ James Harris Lewis^ B.S., University of Georgia; L.L.B., Univer- 
sity of Virginia 

Instructor in History and Political Science 

Margaret Spencer Lubs^ B.Mus., Converse College; B.A., Univer- 
sity of Georgia; M.A., Columbia University 

Chairman, Humanities Department 
Professor of English and French 

John C. McCarthy, Jr., B.B.A. University of Miami; M.B.A., Uni- 
versity of Georgia ; Graduate Study, University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

*Elmo M. McCray, Jr., B.S., M.A., University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

*Francis L. Mannion, Jr., B.LE., University of Florida 
Instructor in Mathematics 

*HiNCKLEY A. Murphy, A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Columbia 

University: Graduate Study, Florida State Uni\ersity 
Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

*JoHN M. P.\rr, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Enginccrim: 

James Harry Persse, B.F.A., University of Georgia; Master of Music. 
Florida Stale Uni\ersily; Graduate \Vork, Florida State Univer- 
sity 

Dean of Students . 

Professor of Music I 

*Part-timc Instructor. 



ADMINISTRATION 11 



*RoBF.RT B. H. Rockwell, Col. (Ret.), li.S., E.E., Gcort^ia Institute 
of Tcchnoloi::)' 

Instructor in Physical Science 

Lkk H. SA^R^.. B.A., Uni\rrsity of the South; M.A., Duke University 
Assi.slant Professor of EniJilish 

James L. Semmes, B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.S., Florida 
State Uni\ersity 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Roy Jesse Sims, B.S., Da\id Lipscomb College; M.S., University of 
Tennessee 

Chairman, Physical Education Department 
Professor of Physical Education: Baseball Coach 

*\V. Lance Smith, B.B.A., L.L.B., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Business Administration 

William M. Starrs, B.A. and M.F.A., Catholic University of America 

Director of the "Masquers" 
Assistant Professor of English 

\ViLLiAM Hugh Stephens, Jr., B.S., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Robert T. Stubbs, B.S., M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Chairman, Mathematics Department 
Professor of Mathematics 

Lawrence M. Tapp, B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education: Basketball Coach 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B., Monmouth College; M.A., Northwest- 
ern University; Certificate in Psychiatric Social Work, Western 
Reserve University 

Chairman, Psychology and Sociology Department 
Professor of Psychology and Sociology 

Jean Wingate Vining, B.S., University of Georgia: Graduate Study, 
University of Georgia 

Instructor in Shorthand, Comptometer, and Typing 



*Part-time Instructor. 



12 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Dorothy Morris Wade, B.S., Univ^crsity of Tennessee; Graduate 
Study, Mexico City College 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Charles C. White, B.S., East Carolina C^ollege; M.A., Southern Illi- 
nois University; Graduate Study, Vanderbilt University, Univer- 
sity of Alabama, University of South Carolina 

Assistant Professor of English 

Edgar Marshall Wtlford, B.A. Harvard College; M.A., Universi- 
ty of California 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Mildred Aleen Williams, B.S., Western Carolina College; M.S., 
Clemson College 

Acting Chairman^ Department of Chemistry 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

William Swoll Winn^ B.D., A.B., Emory University: M.A.. Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

Professor of Mathematics 

Regina Yoast, B.A., Texas Christian University; B.S. in Library Sci- 
ence, Columbia University 

Librarian 



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GENERAL INFORMATION 

History of Armstrong College of Savannah 

Armstrong College of Savannah was founded on May 27, 1935, by 
the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah to meet a long-felt 
need for a junior college. The first college building was the home of the 
late George F. Armstrong, a gift to the city from his widow and daugh- 
ter. The Armstrong Building is an imposing structure of Italian Renais- 
sance design, with a great marble hall and spacious rooms. 

Over the years the campus has been enlarged through pri\ate 
donation and public appropriation until now it includes four additional 
buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane; the John 
W. Hunt Memorial Building, Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, and Thomas 
Gamble Hall. Three oi the buildings, on Gaston Street, face forty-acre 
Forsyth Park, the largest and most beautiful park in the city: the other 
two face Monterey Square, one of the planned squares for which 
Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, facing Forsyth Park on VVhitaker Street, houses the 
college library as well as the Library of the Georgia Historical Society, 
to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college was under the administrative control of the Armstrong 
College Commission until January 1, 1959, when the institution became 
a unit of the University System of Georgia, under the control of the 
State Board of Regents. 

In 1962 the Mills Bee Lane Foundation purchased a new site of 
over 200 acres, selected by the Regents of the University System of 
Georgia, for the college. The new campus will be located in the south- 
western section of the county, approximately seven miles from the 
present college plant. 

Then in 1963 the Regents of the University System approved the 
application of Armstrong College to offer the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Business Administration, 
with the first degrees to be conferred in June, 1968. 

The College Program 

A college is a community of teachers and students who organize 
their energies for the work of the mind. At Armstrong College the stu- 
dent works under able teachers to learn skills — such as the arts of 
language and mathematics — which enable him to understand man and 
his world as these are explored in t.he humanities, the social sciences 
and the natural sciences. 

The student follows a program of study leading to that degree best 
suited to his interest and vocational goal. In any degree program he 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 



will disc()\rr {\\c parliiulai uscliiliuss ol t(i(h ol tlic lihcial ails and 
tirlds ol knowledge lor understanding the world and for livint^ in it. 
while he pursues a more intensixc study ol his major suhjeet. 

A eollege student li\es in a i limate where he is indueed to make 
eonneetions hetween what he thinks and does and the best that has 
been thought and done; it is a climate intended to nourish the judging, 
critical and free mind. The rewards of devotion to college work are 
these liberating skills that enable a man or woman to channel energies 
into the most fruitful life possible for him or her. 

At Armstrong C'o]l(\t;(> a student nip.y pursue one or more oi tiie 
following aims : 

1. A student entering his freshman year in September, 1964, may 
choose a program of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts (major fields: English, history ), J^achelor of Science (ma- 
jor field : biology ) , or Bachelor of Business Administration 
(major fields: economics, accoimting, management j . Full third 
and fourth year programs in these fields will be offered in 1966 
and 1967. Major programs in chemistry, mathematics, political 
science, psychology, sociology and other fields will be added in 
1967 and succeeding years. 

2. A student may plan a pre-professional program designed to 
transfer (after one or more years j toward a professional degree 
in engineering; medicine, medical technology, dentistry, nurs- 
ing, optometry, pharmacy, pre-veterinary medicine; law; the 
ministry; social work; teaching; or another professional field. 

3. A student may plan a semi-professional program (of one or 
more years) in business administration, secretarial skills, human 
relations, and other fields. 

Armstrong College will continue to offer the Associate in Arts de- 
gree to students completing all requirements of a two-year program 
before September, 1966. 

Armstrong Evening Classes 

In addition to the full daytime schedule, Armstrong offers a 
schedule of classes in the evening, including most of the required 
courses for many programs leading towards a degree. 

Students employed during the day must limit their enrollment 
to one or two courses each quarter. 

Student Personnel Services 

Armstrong College offers to students special kinds of help outside 
the classroom through a program which has attracted wide interest 
from other colleges. 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

When a student becomes aware of a difficulty related to his course 
work, he is urged to request help from his instructor. For advice con- 
cerning his choice of vocation, the planning of his college program, 
or study habits, he should see his ad\isor. 

In addition, Student Personnel Services offers to all students cur- 
rently enrolled at Armstrong College these ser\'ices: 

1 . Individual, short-term counselling on any problems that inter- 
fere with the student's functioning in college. 

2. Group counselling aimed at overcoming any difficulty in com- 
munication which may affect academic performance. 

3. Individual aptitude, achievement, interest, vocational and in- 
telligence tests for guidance on decisions affecting choice of 
educational programs and vocations. 

4. Consultation on requirements for various careers. 

5. Information on scholarships^ loans and financial assistance 
available for further college work. 

6. Consultation on senior college programs from available senior 
college catalogues. 

7. Information on available, part-time job openings for students. 

A student's use of any of these services is voluntary and all 
material discussed is confidential unless both student and counsellor 
aa^ree to share the information with others. 

Library 

The library of Armstrong College is housed in Hodgson Hall on 
the corner of Whitaker and West Gaston Streets. The open stack 
plan of the library makes all materials readily available to students 
and encourages independent research. The main floor Reference 
Room contains, in addition to the reference collection, all books 
which are classified according to the Dewey Decimal System, the 
individual biography collection, the reserve collection, and the cir- 
culation desk. The lower floor Reading Room contains the fiction 
collection, current and bound volumes of periodicals, and the listen- 
ing area. The offices of the library staff and the catalog room are 
also located on the lower floor. 

At the present time the library collection consists of more than 
15,000 bound volumes, as well as a number of pamphlets on subjects 
of current interest and a small government documents collection. 
The library receives more than 125 periodicals, including 5 news- 
papers. The library collection also includes 350 phonograph record- 
ings which are available for circulation, and more than 50 tape 
recordings which are used to supplement class instruction and for 
indixidual pleasure. 



GENERAL INEC^RMATION 17 



In ciddition to \\\c ii'soiii c cs ol the (ollc^c library, tlic studcnls 
have free access to the holdings ol" the Georgia Historical Society, also 
housed in Hodgson Hall. Tliis library contains an outstanding col- 
lection of materials on Georgia and its history as well as a large col- 
lection of materials on Southern histoiy. The holdings of the His- 
torical Society consist of more than ten thousand books, eighty 
periodical subscriptions, and extensi\e manuscrij^t collection, and 
one of the more complete files of the Savannah newspapers, dating 
back to 1763. 

Office of Coininiiiiity Services 

1. SJiort Courses, Workshops, and Institutes. These are planned, 
organized and administered by the Office in response to a 
group interest, or to meet a community need brought to the 
attention of the Director. All such short courses and workshops 
are offered on a non-credit basis. Subjects covered vary widely, 
ranging from "Computer Concepts" to "Getting Started in 
Exports." The Director is always glad to arrange courses for 
candidates preparing to take the professional examinations in 
such fields as; Engineering; Insurance; Real Estate or secre- 
tarial work. The college has been designated as an approved 
Center for a number of these examinations. The success of the 
second Writers' Workshop indicates that it will become an 
annual affair, and similar workshops in other areas of the 
arts are contemplated. 

2. The Alumni Office. The prime purpose of this office is to 
keep former students informed about the college, and to help 
them keep in touch with each other. Any person who at any 
time was matriculated as a regular student is eligible for 
membership in the Alumni Society, and upon payment of his 
dues wall receive the quarterly newsletter, "The Geechee 
Gazette," and may vote and hold office in the society. The 
Alumni Office assists in arranging class re-imions, board meet- 
ings and other similar functions. 

3. University of Georgia Extension Courses. These courses offer 
the student the opportunity to earn upper division credit from 
the University of Georgia. Instructors for these courses are 
approved by department heads and deans of the respective 
colleges at the University, and grades are recorded in the 
Registrar's Office in Athens. Most senior colleges will accept 
up to 45 hours credit for extension courses, so a student can 
complete a third year of college work at Armstrong. Fees for 
extension courses are $7.00 per quarter hour, plus $1.00 reg- 
istration fee. Applications and registrations for extension 



18 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

classes are handled by the Department of Community Services, 
entirely separate from Armstrong courses. 

4. Public Information and Public Relations. All announcements, 
statements of policy or news releases are issued through the 
Department of Community Services. 

5. Planning for Adult Education. In a world where it is said 
that "more knowledge has been discovered during the life- 
time of the present adult population than existed at the time 
of its birth", continuing adult education has become an im- 
perative. Education is carrying a built-in obsolescence caused 
by scientific and technical advances, rapid economic and 
political changes, and shifts in employment patterns. To help 
meet this challenge, the Department of Community Services 
is ready to cooperate with any group, educational, industrial, 
or social, to enlarge the opportunities for individuals to keep 
in step with the quickening pace of modern life. 

Student Activities 

In addition to the academic side of college life, Armstrong Col- 
lege offers a complete program of extra-curricular student activities 
designed to contribute to the development of the student and assist 
him in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. 
This program is administered by the college through the office of the 
Dean of Students. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT— The Student Senate is the gov- 
erning body for student activities at Armstrong College. It is com- 
prised of elected representatives of all campus organizations recog- 
nized by the Senate. It is the function of the Student Senate to co- 
ordinate, direct and control student activities and organizations at 
Armstrong. 

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS— College organizations in- 
clude a dramatic club, a Glee Club, five religious clubs, a Debate 
Forum, and other groups promoting interest in certain phases of the 
academic program or specific career fields. 

THE MASQUERS offer membership to all students and 
faculty members interested in any phase of the theatre: act- 
ing, designing, lighting, make-up, costuming, and other pro- 
duction skills. THE MASQUERS possess a well equipped 
theater, and are under the direction of a professional dra- 
matics director. They produce a number of plays for the 
community annually. 

The Armstrong Glee Club is composed of students who 
enjoy singing and desire the satisfaction to be gained from 



1 



S'lUDEN 1 ACri\ lllES 19 

group singing. Hrsidcs two yearly concerts at the college, 
the Glee Club has produced musicals with the Armstrong 
Masquers and sung for many civic groups in Savannah. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS— There are two student publica- 
tions at Armstrong College, The Inkwell, a newspaper, and the 
'Geechee, the college annual. These afford the students an oppor- 
tunity to express themselves through creative writing, layout and art 
work, and to gain experience in these and other journalistic activities. 

ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES— Armstrong College participates in 
intercollegiate sports competition in basketball, golf and baseball. Other 
sports at the college, such as volleyball, bowling, tennis, golf, soft- 
ball, etc., are offered on an intramural basis with competition be- 
tween volunteer intramural teams or between other interested campus 
organizations. All are encouraged to take part in this program. 

STUDENT CENTER — The college does not operate a boarding 
department. The Student Center in the Hunt Building is open 
throughout the day and provide light lunches at reasonable prices. 
The Center also provides recreational facilities and houses the book 
store. 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Apjjlicaiion lorins for admission to Aiinstiono College are pro- 
vided by the Director of Admissions upon request. 

An application cannot be considered until all required forms are 
properly executed and returned to the Admissions Office. Application 
forms for entrance in 1964-1965 must be submitted on or before dates 
set forth below. 

Summer Session, 1964 — -May 19 

Fall Quarter, 1964 — August 1 

Winter Quarter, 1965 — December 14 

Spring Quarter, 1965 — March 1 

Summer Session, 1965 — May 1 

For preferred registration status in Fall, 1965, applications must 
be submitted by May 1, 1965. 

With application form must be submitted: application form fee. 
transcripts, and College Entrance Examination Board scores. 

The College reserves the right to terminate acceptance of applica- 
tions when enrollment capacity is reached. The College further reserves 
the right to reject an applicant who is not a resident of the State of 
Georgia. 

Requirements & Conditions to be Met by Applicant 

An applicant will be declared eligible for admission only upon his 
compliance with the following requirements and conditions: 

1. The applicant must be at least sixteen years old on or before 
registration date and must be of good moral character. Armstrong Col- 
lege reserves the right to examine and appraise the character, person- 
ality, and physical fitness of the applicant. 

2. The applicant nuist meet one of the following conditions: 

a. Graduation from an accredited high school. 

b. Successful completion of the General Education Develop- 
ment Test with no score less than 45. 

3. A transcript of the applicant's high school records must be sub- 
mitted by the high school directly to the college. 

4. The applicant must have a minimum of sixteen units a^ 
follows : 

English— 4 

Mathematics (One must be algebra) — 2 

(Two years of algebra and one of geometiy are needed for 
those entering the Engineering or Scientific fields.) 
Science — 2 
Social Studies — 2 

Other academic units — 4 1 

Others 2 



ADMISSION 21 



l\]c i'.oWc^^v icsfiAcs the lighl to reject aii) or all ol tlif ticdils 
from any high school or other institution, notwithstanding its accredited 
status, where the College determines through investigation or otherwise 
that the quality ol' instruction at such high school or other institution 
is for any reason deficient or unsatisfactory. 

5. The Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board is required of all applicants. Official results of this test 
must be filed with the Admissions Office by the final date for submit- 
ting application for the quarter for which the student wishes to enroll. 

Chan*^e in Requireiiimts for 1965: 

Applicants for (he Sunimcr and Fall Quarters of 1965 and there- 
after will also be required to submit scores of Achievement Tests in 
English and Mathematics as well as Scholastic Aptitude Test scores. 
All tests are of the College Entrance Examination Board, hiformation 
on these tests can be obtained from the high school principal or coun- 
selor, or from the Admissions Office of Arm,strong College. 

6. Each student applying to enter Armstrong as a day student 
must have his physician complete and sign the Physician's Statement 
contained in the application, after which one parent should sign in the 
space provided. 

Chaiioje in Requirements for 1965: 

Beginning with the Fall Quarter 1965, all applicants both day and 
evening, will be required to submit the Physician's Statement filled out 
by a physician. 

7. Application Form Fee. 

A validating fee of $5.00 must accompany each complete applica- 
tion form before it can be given official consideration. This fee does 
not bind Armstrong College to admit the applicant nor does it indicate 
acceptance of the applicant's qualifications. The fee wall not be 
credited toward the matriculation fee in the event that the applicant 
is accepted as a student and it will not be refunded in the event that 
the applicant does not enroll as a student. An applicant who fails 
to enroll for the quarter for which he is accepted must reapply for 
admission if he wishes to enter the institution at a later time by re- 
submission of fee by the date specified. 

Further Policies 

1. When the application forms, College Entrance Examination 

f Board scores, and other required records of the applicant are found to 

be complete and in order, the applicant will be evaluated in terms of 

his grades, scholastic test scores, and potential ability. His predicted 

grade average based on these factors must indicate that the applicant 



22 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



has the polcnlial to pursue effectively the educational program of the 
Clollcgc. 

2. The CiOllege reserves the right to examine further any appli- 
cant by the use of psychological, achievement, and aptitude tests. Each 
applicant must give evidence of good moral character, promise of 
growth and development, seriousness of purpose, and a sense of social 
responsibility. 

3. The College further reserves the right to require additional 
biographical data and/or an interview before the applicant is accepted 
or rejected. If an interview is required, the applicant will be notified. 

4. The Director of Admissions may refer any applicant to the 
Admissions Committee of the College for study and advice. The ulti- 
mate decision as to whether an applicant shall be accepted or rejected 
shall be made by the Director of Admissions subject to the applicant's 
right of appeal as provided in the policies of the Board of Regents of 
the University System. 

5. The Director of Admissions shall, as promptly as practicable, 
inform the applicant of the action taken upon his application. 

Transfer Students 

1. All regulations applicable to students entering college for the 
first time shall be applicable to students transferring from other col- 
leges. These regulations are described in the foregoing section on 
Admissions. 

2. A student who applies to transfer to Armstrong College from 
another college shall submit the following: 

a. Application 

b. Fee 

c. Transcripts of all other colleges attended. 

d. Scholastic Aptitude Test scores 

(Beginning with the Summer Quarter of 1965, CEEB 
Achievement Test scores in English and Mathematics will 
also be required.) 

An applicant will not be considered for admission unless the 
transcript shows honorable discharge from the college last attended 
or unless the officials of the institution last attended recommend the 
applicant's admission. 

3. Regulations in regard to transfer of credit: 

(a) The amount of academic credit that the College will 
allow for work done in another institution within a given 
period of time may not exceed the normal amount of 



( 



! 



ADMISSION 23 



crrdit tliat ((Mild lia\r hvcn earned at the Collej^e duiinj^ 
that time. A inaxiinuin of sixty (60) academic ciuarter 
hours trom an accredited collec^e may he aj)j)Hed in the 
apphcant's program at Armstrong. 

(b) Courses transferred for credit from other colleges or uni- 
versities must have an over-all grade of "d". (^nly 
grades of "C" or better are acceptable in Freshman 
English. No credit is allowed for remedial English and 
mathematics. 

(c) A student on probation or academic suspension at an- 
other college will not be considered by Armstrong until 
two (2) quarters have elapsed since date of probation or 
suspension. 

(d) The total number of hours that may be earned toward 
an associate degree by extension courses shall not exceed 
twenty-two and one-half (22/2) quarter hours. 

Readinission of Former Students 

A. Former students who have attended other colleges. 

1. If student is former Transient he must present new Transient 
Letter or all grades from other schools attended since he was at 
Armstrong. 

2. A fonner regular student at Armstrong who has transferred to 
another college must present a Transient Letter or transcript of 
all colleges attended since leaving Armstrong. 

B. FoiTner students who have not attended another college. 

1 . A former regular Armstrong student who has not been elsewhere 
may be readmitted by the Registrar's office if 

a. He is in good academic standing 

b. If two quarters have elapsed since his first or second aca- 
demic dismissal from Armstrong. 

c. If the student bears a letter approving readmission by the 
Committee on Academic Standing. 

2. No readmission is possible after a third academic dismissal. 

Admission of Veterans 

Armstrong College of Savannah will accept veterans who are 
not high school graduates if their official General Educational De- 
velopment tests show scores that indicate the applicant's ability to 
do college work. A Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement (VA 
Form VB 7-1993) is required of every \eteran who attends this insti- 



24 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

tution under Public Law 550 (Korean Bill), application for which 
may be completed at the State Department of Veterans Service, 8 
East Bay Street, Savannah, Geor^i^ia. Immediately upon receipt of 
Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement from the State Department 
of Veterans Service the student should contact the Armstrong College 
Veterans Office regarding processing of certificate and future monthly 
reports. All veterans attending Armstrong College under Public Law 
550 should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at time of registration. 

Applicants Sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or other 
commimity agencies must apply at least six (6) weeks before the be- 
ginning of any quarter to insure proper processing of application. 

Foreign Students 

A student from a countiy other than the United States who is 
interested in AiTnstrong must meet the following requirements before 
application is made. 

L He must have met the requirements of paragraph 4, under 
Admission Requirements, in regard to units in the subjects required 
at Armstrong. 

2. His transcript should be sent to the Admissions Office at 
Armstrong with an official translation. 

3. He should take the SAT of the College Entrance Examination 
Board in the testing center nearest his home and ask that the results 
be sent to Armstrong. 

If all of the above requirements have been passed on favorably 
by Armstrong, the applicant will be sent a set of application papers. 
When these are received, the applicant will receive an 1-20 FoiTn I- 
20 A and 1-20 B), w^hich he can then take to the American Consul 
to ask for a student visa. 

Armstrong is a city college and has no dormitory' or boarding fa- 
cilities, so these must be arranged by any student who does not li\e 
in Savannah. 

No scholarships are available for students who are not residents 
of Georgia. All foreign students pay non-resident fees. 

Residency Requirements of the Board of Regents 

1. A student who is under 21 years of age at the time he seeks 
to register or re-register at the beginning of any quarter will he 
accepted as a resident student only upon a showing by him that his 



i 



ADMISSION 25 



supporting parent or guardian lias hccn k-gally domic ilt*cl in (ii'orgia 
for a period of at least twelve months immediately preceding the date 
of registration or re-registration. 

2. In the e\ent that a legal resident ol Cieorgia is appointed as 
the guardian of a non-resident minor, such minor will not be per- 
mitted to register as a resident until the expiration of one year from 
the date of the appointment, and then only upon proper showing 
that such appointment was not made to avoid the non-resident fee. 

3. If a student is o\er 21 years of age, he must show that residence 
in Georgia was established at least one year prior to the registration 
date. Any period of time during which a person is enrolled as a student 
in an educational institution in Georgia may not be counted as a part 
of the year's residence herein required when it appears that the student 
came into the State and remained in the State for the primaiy purpose 
of attending a school or college. 

Anv inquiries about residency should be directed to the Admissions 
Office. ' 



FEES 

Application Fee 

The Application Fee of $5.00 is made by all students at the time 
of initial application for admission to Annstrong College. The accep- 
tance of the Application Fee does not constitute acceptance of student. 
This fee is not refundable. (See paragraph 8 under Admission to the 
College.) 



Matriculation Fee 

The Matriculation Fee for students registering for the normal 
course load of fifteen houi-s is $45.00. Special students those carr\'ing 
less than 12 credit hours in a quarter) will pay at the rate of $3.75 per 
quarter hour in Matriculation Fee. 



Out of State Tuition 

Xon-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $60.00 per quarter 
in addition to all regular fees. Special students those carrying less 
than 12 credit hours in a quarter) who are not legal residents of 
the State of Georgia will pay at the rate of $5.00 per quarter hour 
Out-of-State Fee in addition to all regular fees. 



Student Activity Fee 

There will be a student Activity Fee of SI 0.00 per quarter. 
This fee is not refundable. Student Activity Fee will be chars:ed to 
any Day Student who has registered for ten or more quarter hours. 
No charge will be made to Evening Program Students. 



Late Registration Fee 

In the Summer Session a late registration fee of $4.00 will be 
charged to students registering on the first day of class and a fee of 
$5.00 will be charged for registrations completed on the last day to 
register for credit. 

In the Fall, \Vinter and Spring Quarters a late registration fee 
of $3.00 will be charged to students registering on the date listed in 
the catalog as the date on which classes begin. A fee of $4.00 will 
be charged for res:istrations completed on the day following the date 
on which classes begin. A fee of $5.00 will be charged for registra- 
tions completed on the date listed in the catalog as the ''last day to 
register for credit." 



FEES 27 



Change of Srlirchilr Fee 



't^ 



A fee of $2.00 is charged for the changing of a student's schedule 
after the registration cards have been processed. No charge is made 
if the change is initiated by the College. This fee is not refundable. 



Graduation Fee 

A Graduation Fee of $7.50 will be collected from each candidate 
for graduation. 



Transcript Fee 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college 
work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 each. 



Music Fees 

Students enrolled in Applied Music Courses will be required to 
pay a special fee. The fees are indicated in the description of courses 
found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 



Make-up Test Fee 

For cause, a student may arrange with an instructor to make 
up an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to 
make up the announced test must be made within one week after the 
student returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the making up of any announced 
quiz and a fee of $5.00 for a make-up final examination and labora- 
tory examinations, except as shown below. The total charges to any 
one student for a final make-up examination in a given subject shall 
not exceed $5.00. All fees will be paid to the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final 
xaminations will not be charged are as follows: The student was 
cibsent (1) on official college business; (2) due to illness; (3) because 
of death in the family; or (4) in observing religious holidays. 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from paying the 
fee must be presented in writing to the instructor. 



28 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Short Courses 

Fees arc announced for each course when the course is announced. 
No refund can be made for withdrawal from a course. 

Suiiiniary of Fees 

Matriculation, per quarter $ 45.00 

Student Activity, per quarter 10.00 



TOTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS $ 55.00 

Out-of-State Tuition, per quarter 60.00 



TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS $115.00 

Matriculation, Special Students, per quarter hour 3.75 

Non-Resident Tuition, Special Students, per quarter 

hour (in addition to Matriculation Fee) 5.00 

Privilege Fees 

Application Fee . $ 5.00 

Late Registration — Maximum 5.00 

Special Examinations 2.00 

Final Examinations — ...— 5.00 

Graduation 7.50 

Transcript, first one free, each additional 1.00 

Change of Schedule ..- 2.00 

Refunds 

Refunds of fees wull be made only upon written application for 
withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to students dropping 
a course. Students who formally withdraw during one week following 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of SO^c of 
the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw dur- 
ing the period between one and two weeks after the scheduled regis- 
tration date are entitled to a refund of 60^r of the fees paid for that 
quarter. Students who formally withdraw between two and three 
weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund 
of 40^c of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally 
withdraw dining the period between three and four weeks after the 
scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 20% of the 
fees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after a period of 
four weeks has elapsed from the scheduled registration date will be 
entitled to no refund of any part of the fees paid for that quarter. 



1 



SCHOLARSHIPS 29 



Students who foniially witliciraw from the Suinmci Session are 
entitled to refunds as follows: 
Withdrawal on 1st, 2nd or 

3rd day of first week 80^c refund of fees paid 

Withdrawal on 4th or 5th 

day of first week 60^ c refund of fees paid 

Withdrawal on 1st, 2nd or 

3rd day of second week 40% refund of fees paid 

\Vithdrawal on 4th or 5th 

day of second week 20^/c refund of fees paid 

Fees and Charges are Subject to Change at the End of any Quarter 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 
not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquency has been removed. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full at the time of regis- 
tration. 

If a check is not paid on presentation to the bank on which it is 
drawn, the student's registration will be cancelled and the student may 
re-register only on payment of a $5.00 service charge. 

Scholarships 

A number of scholarships are a\ailable to Armstrong College. In 
general these are awarded on the basis of need and scholastic ability. 
Applications for scholarships are accepted between January 1st and 
May 15th for the following school year. Scholarships are awarded by 
means of interviews held during the month of June. 

Application blanks and further information on scholarships may 
be obtained by contacting the Director of Student Aid. No applicant 
will be considered for scholarship aid who has not been accepted for 
admission to the college. 

The following scholarships will be awarded for the 1964-65 school 
year: 

Armstrong Colles^e Alumni Association — One scholarship for 
$250.00. 

Arthur Lucas Memorial Scholarships — Eisiht scholarships for 
$100.00 each. 

Alpha Tau Beta — One scholarship for $125.00 is offered to a 
member of the sorority attending Armstrong College. 

Edward McGuire Gordon Memorial Scholarship — One scholar- 
ship for $200.00 to a male resident of Chatham County. 

Harry G. Strachan, III Memorial Scholarship — One scholarship 
for $200.00 is offered to a freshman student. 



30 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Junior Chamber of Commerce — Three scholarships for $185.00 
each. 

Panhellcnic Association of Savannah- — One scholarship for $100.00 
to a female student. 

Savannah Gas Company — Two scholarships for $165.00 each to 
a day school student. 

Georgia Consumer Finance Assn. — Five scholarships for $100.00 
each. 

American Association of Railway Businesswomen — One scholar- 
ship for $200.00 to a female student. 

Rebel Chapter, American Businesswomen's Club — One scholar- 
ship for $250.00 to a female student. 

Delta Kappa Gamma — One scholarship for $90.00 to a female 
student majorinij in education. 

Hunter Air Force Base Officers' \Vi\ es Club Scholarship — One 
scholarship for $338.00 to a day school freshman student whose parent 
is on active duty with the Air Force and stationed at Hunter Air Force 
Base. 

Regents' Scholarships 

Another source of scholarship aid for students who are residents 
of the State of Georgia is the Regents' Scholarship. These scholarships 
are awarded to superior students who are in need of financial assistance 
to attend college. To be eligible for a Regents* Scholarship a student 
must have average grades or predicted average grades that place him 
in the upper 25% of his class. Recipients of Regents' Scholarships 
are expected, upon completion of their program of study, to reside 
in the State of Georgia for a period of one year for each $1,000.00 of 
scholarship aid received. 

Further information on these scholarships and application form^ 
may be obtained from the Director of Student Aid at the college. 

The deadline for applving for the Reoents' Scholarships is May 
1st. 

Other Sources of Financial Aid to Armstrong 

College 

Solomon's Lodge No. 1,F.& A.M. Scholarships — Two scholarships 
for $240.00 each to be awarded to a graduate of a tax-supported high 
school. Apply to: Committee on Scholarship Awards, Solomon's Lodge 
No. 1, F. & A.M., P.O. Box 1711, Savannah, Ga. 

Savannah Chapter, National Secretaries Assn. — One scholarship 
covering tuition, fees and expenses, for a female student majoring in 
secretarial science. Apply to : High School Counselor or typing teacher. 



FINANCIAL AID 31 



William V . C.ooptM Eclucati(>iial I'liiul IMovidcs stholai ships to 
female stiidriits in all fields cxcej)! Law. I'licolo^y, and Medicine 
(Nmsinii and Medical Teehnolouy arc acceptable). Apply to: Trust 
Department. Sa\annah Hank & Trust Clo., between April 1st and May 
31. St. 

Stale Teachers' Scholarships — Provides scholarship funds lor stu- 
dents who will enter the field of teachino in the State of CJeor^ia. Apply 
to: Georgia State Teachers' Scholarshijj Prc^cjiam. State Dcjjartment 
of Education. Room. 247. State Office Ikiilding, Atlanta 3, Cieorgia. 

Ty C'obb Educational Foundation Scholarships^ — Provides scholar- 
ship aid for residents of the State of Georgia who have completed their 
freshman year in college. Apply to: Ty C-obb Educational Foundation 
Scholarships, Room 454. 244 Washington Street, S.W., Atlanta 3, Ga. 

Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund — Provides loans at reason- 
able interest rates to students in need of such aid to attend college. 
Apply to: Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund. P.O. Box 1238, Co- 
lumbus, Ga. 

Sa\annah Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship — One scholar- 
ship for $200.00 for a freshman student majoring in pre-pharmacy to 
attend Armstrong College (or the University of Georgia). Apply to: 
Mr. Donald Overstreet, Chairman, Scholarship Committee, Savannah 
Pharmaceutical Association, c/o DeRenne Pharmacy. 17 East DeRenne 
Avenue, Savannah. 

Chatham Artillery Scholarships — A number of scholarships for 
$250.00 each to members of the Chatham Artillery attending college 
full-time. Apply to the Chatham Artiller)-. 

State Department of Vocational Rehabilitation — Students who 
have had a physical or emotional handicap, and have been treated suc- 
cessfully, and are considered acceptable for vocational rehabilitation, 
may receive financial assistance to attend college through the State 
Department of Vocational Rehabilitation. Apply to: 35 Abercorn 
Street. Savannah. 



Student Assistants 

Some financial aid is available to a limited number of students 
through the Student Assistant program. A number of part-time jobs 
are offered to students in the \arious departments of the college. In- 
terested students should contact the Dean of Students prior to the 
beginning of each quarter. 

Student Personnel Services serves as a clearing house for part 
time job opportunities in the community. 



REGULATIONS 

Faculty Advisers 

The Academic Dean's Office assigns a faculty adviser to even- 
student enrolled in day or evening classes. Before registering for 
classes each quarter a student must consult his adviser and receive 
his written approval for the courses in which the student plans to 
enroll. 

Pre-Rejjistration and Pre-Advisement 

At announced times during each quarter a student may pre- 
register or be pre-advised for his courses for the following quarter. 
The dates for the pre-registration and pre-advisement period are given 
in the calendar of this Bulletin. Instructions will be published quar- 
terly. 

Advanced Placement 

Armstrong College gives advanced placement, or in some cases 
college credit, for college level high school courses, on the basis of the 
high school teacher's recommendation, the student's grade on the 
Advanced Placement Examination, and approval by the department 
chairman of Armstrong College. 

Placement Tests 

To help a student select a definite objective early in his college 
program, the Armstrong staff administers to each entering freshman 
a series of interest and achievement tests. Achievement tests in English 
and mathematics are administered prior to admission. Placement in 
English and mathematics courses is determined on the basis of the 
student's high school record and the scores on these tests. Interest 
tests are administered during Freshman Week. On the basis of these 
objective measurements, the student's previous record, and his interest, 
the student with the aid of his adviser decides on a program of study 
which will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 



Placement in "English 100" 

On the basis of entrance test scores and high school record, cer- 
tain students will be required to take "English 100" in their first quar- 
ter. This course must be completed with a grade of at least "G" 
before these students may register for any other English course. "Eng- 
lish 100" may be repeated once, but only in the following quarter. 



I 



REGULATIONS 33 



Physical Education Program 

All day students who arc carrying as many as 10 quarter hours 
and (or) are candidates for di[)lonias or certificates are recjuired to 
attain credit for six physical education courses, one each quarter. A 
student graduating in less than six quarters may reduce the physical 
education requirements accordingly. Regular courses should be taken 
in proper sequence and two required courses should not be scheduled 
in any one quarter. 

Students planning a one-year program may choose any three 
of the required physical education courses. 

A student who has served a minimum of three months in the mili- 
tary services shall be exempt from Physical Education 111. A student 
who has served a minimum of six months in the military services shall 
be exempt from Physical Education 111 and 112. Proof of service 
time shall be presented to the Physical Education Department. 

In order for a day student to be excused from any one physical 
education course, he must have his or her doctor sign a special form. 
A student who does not plan to graduate from Armstrong College will 
be allowed to register for any quarter without physical education pro- 
viding he or she signs the form provided by the Physical Education 
Department. No student may register without a required physical 
education course except with written permission from the Physical 
Education Department. 

The physical education department requires all students to make 
up all excused absences. Any unexcused absence from class will result 
in a lower final grade. 

Physical education is not required of students in the evening 
program. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 16-17 quarter hours per 
quarter. A schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that the aver- 
age student will devote approximately forty-eight hours per week to his 
college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Except in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 1 7 quar- 
ter hours will be granted only to students who have a "B" average for 
the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to graduation, a student 
may take an extra course which is necessary to meet requirements for 
graduation. No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 
hours in any one quarter. 

No student who is employed full-time will be allowed to take 
more than 1 1 quarter hours of work in the fall, winter or spring quar- 
ter unless he has better than a "B" average in the last quarter for 
which grades are available. No student may enroll for more than ten 



34 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

cjLiartcr hours of credit in the Summer Session. This regulation 
does not apply to transient students who are regularly enrolled in 
another institution. 

Auditin*]^ 

A student wishing to "audit" a course without receiving credit 
must obtain the written permission of the instructor before he registers 
for the course. (Policy for some courses forbids "auditing") An 
"auditor" cannot change to regular credit status after the first week 
of class. A student who registers for a course as an "auditor" receives 
no credit, "N. C", on his transcript. 

Admission to Class 

A student will be admitted to class when the instructor is furn- 
ished an official class card indicating that the student has completed 
his registration and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations of the faculty and the Regents of 
University System of Georgia is assumed. Gambling, hazing, and the 
use on the campus of intoxicating beverages are prohibited. 

Attendance 

At Armstrong a student's responsibility towards a course includes 
all that transpires in class sessions as well as the subject matter of the 
course. Any absence whatsoever from class work entails a loss to the 
student. 

An absence may be excused by the instructor if the student is 
absent 

( 1 ) on official college business, 

(2) due to illness (with a doctor's certification), 

(3) because of death in the immediate family, 

(4) in observing religious holidays. 

In unusual instances an instructor may excuse an absence for other 
serious reasons. 

A student who has been absent from class for such a valid reason 
should present a written statement to his instructor. 

Excuses must be submitted within seven days from the date the 
student returns to school; otherwise the absence will not be excused. 

Any student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the 
times the class meets in one week, and has one additional absence, 
will be dropped from class. The instructor will notify the Registrar's 
Office when a student should be dropped. The Registrar's Office 
will notify the student. A student who is dropped within three weeks 
after the beginning of the quarter will automatically receive a grade 
of \V. A student who is dropped after the third week of the quarter 
will receive either a W or a W/F depending upon his status at the 
time he withdraws or is dropped from class. 



REGULATIONS 35 



A stutliMil will bf |HMKili/('cl lor uiirxciiscd absences from the 
first day the class meets (e\en though registration is not yet com- 
pleted), unless one of the four valid excuses applies. 

Any student whose absences for any cause exceed one- third of the 
niunber of times the class meets in the (juarter will be droj)|)ed from 
the class. The student will be given W or VV/F deijcndini; uj)ou his 
academic status at the time he is dropped. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the Registrar in writing, is a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediately 
make such an intention known to the Registrar in writing. This 
notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

A student should formally withdraw from any class by securing 
the signature of the instructor and his faculty adviser. This written 
approval should be filed in the Registrar's office. A student who 
withdraws within three weeks after the beginning of the quarter will 
automatically receive a grade of \V. A student who withdraws after 
the 3rd week of the quarter will receive a W or W/F depending upon 
his status at the time the student withdraws or is dropped from class. 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt by the faculty that students in college should be held 
accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, report cards, warnings 
of deficient scholarship and all such notices are not sent to parents 
or guardians by the Registrar except on request. Instead the students 
themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact their 
advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report cards are issued 
at the end of each quarter. Reports of failing grades are issued in the 
middle of each quarter. Each student has access to an adviser; in 
addition, the Registrar and all instructors are available to help any 
student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 
Numerical Span Honor Points 

4.5 
4 

3.5 
3 

2.5 
2 
1.5 





A+ 


95 - 100 


A 


90- 94 


B+ 


85- 89 


B 


80- 84 


c+ 


75- 79 


c 


70- 74 


D-f 


65- 69 


D 


60- 64 


F 


Below 60 


E 


Incomplete 


W 


Withdrew with no grade 


WF 


Withdrew faiHng 


NC 


No credit 



36 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

A student who receives an "E" (incomplete grade) should consult 
his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of the 
course. An "E" grade which has not been removed by the middle of the 
succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F". 

Honors 

Dean's List: Students enrolled for at least ten hours of course 
work who earn an honor point average of 3.0 or above will be placed 
on the Dean's List which is published quarterly. 

Permanent Dean's List: At the completion of forty-five hours of 
course work, students with an honor point average of at least 3.0 
will be placed on the Permanent Dean's List which is published 
yearly in June. Sophomores completing forty-five hours (to make a 
total of ninety) and earning an honor point average of 3.0 will be 
placed on the Permanent Dean's List. 

Students eligible under the above categories and earning an honor 
point average of 3.96 or above will be placed on the Permanent Dean's 
List and designated With Distinction. 

Honors at Graduation 

Summa Cum Laude: Students who are graduating with an honor 
point average of 3.96 or above will be designated as graduating summa 
cum laude. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point aver- 
age of from 3.0 to 3.96 will be graduated cum laude. 

Valedictorian: The valedictorian will be selected by the gradu- 
ating class from the five students with the highest academic average 
in the work completed up to the quarter just prior to graduation. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 

A student failing to maintain the following grade point average^ 
on all work attempted at Armstrong College will be placed on aca- 
demic probation for two quarters. 

Quarter Hours Grade Point Average 

45 1.6 

90 1.8 

135 1.9 

180 2.0 



REGULATIONS 37 



Academic probation ictiiiiics that a student maintain a grade 
point average of at least 2.0 for each of two successive quarters. 
Failure to meet the requirements of such probation will result in the 
dismissal of the student for two quarters. 

A full-time student (one who enrolls for 12 or more quarter 
hoins) who fails to pass at least one course other than physical educa- 
tion in any quarter will be dismissed from the college for two quarters. 
A part-time student (one who enrolls for less than 12 quarter hours) 
who fails to pass at least one course other than physical education in 
two successive quarters will be dismissed from the college for two 
quarters. A grade of "E" ^incomplete) will be considered an ''F" 
until it is removed. 

A student re-entering the college after academic dismissal will 
be placed on academic probation for two successive quarters. 

The Summer Session will be considered a normal quarter for the 
above regulations. 

A student dismissed for academic reasons may appeal his dismissal 
to the Committee on Academic Standing. Such appeals must be made 
in writing to the Committee (addressed to the Secretary), should 
state the nature of all extenuating circumstances relating to his aca- 
demic deficiency, and must be received by the Committee by the time 
of its announced meeting. 

A third dismissal for failure to meet the academic standards of 
the college shall in all cases be final. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College of Sa- 
vannah are listed below: 

1. The student will complete a program of study listed elsewhere 
in the catalog under ''Programs of Study" with a grade point 
average of 2.0 on work taken at Armstrong. Any exceptions to 
a program may be refened by a student's adviser to the Aca- 
demic Dean. 

2. The final 45 quarter hours of the work required for graduation 
shall be completed at Armstrong College of Savannah. 

3. By state law one of the requirements for a diploma or certifi- 
cate from schools supported by the State of Georgia is a dem- 
onstration of proficiency in United States history and govern- 
ment and in Georgia history- and government. A student at 
Armstrong may demonstrate such proficiency by passing 

1) History 100, 

or 2) PoHtical Science 113 and Histor\' 226, 



38 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

or 3) A two hour examination in United States and Georgia 
history and government. 

4. When exceptions to prerequisites for courses are made, per- 
mission may be granted only by the head of the department 
concerned. A recommendation regarding any request for ex- 
ception to prerequisites for courses must be made to the depart- 
ment head by the course instructor. This need not be binding 
upon the department head. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Registrar's 
Office one quarter prior to the expected date of graduation. 

Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the grades 
the student earns and his student records. 

The files of the Registrar's office which include all permanent 
records are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, the Civil Service, the local Credit Bureau and other 
agencies having access to confidential records. A good college record is 
of vital importance to a student. 



I 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Tlu' DfuitH' di Associate in Aits will he conlciicd upon students 
conipletiiiii all recpiinMnenls ol a two xcar j)i()nrani hcloic Scptcnilx-r. 
1966. 

Iii\ninnini; in June. 19(i8, the Dcl^uh's of Bachelor ol Aits. i)a( hclor 
of Science, and l^achelor of Business Administration will he conferred 
upon students completing all recjuirements for those degrees. 

Before registration e\ery student must plan a program of study 
with a faculty adviser appointed hy the Academic Dean. Even if a stu- 
dent knows what coiuses are required in his program, he must have on 
record in the office of his adviser a copy of his program. Before a stu- 
dent may change his planned program he must consult his adviser. 

If a student plans to transfer to another college before graduation, 
he should acquire the catalog of that college in order to determine 
what courses must be completed at Armstrong to meet the degree re- 
quirements of the college to which he may transfer. 

A student planning to receive the Associate in Arts degree in 1965 
or 1966 is responsible for securing approval for his program from his 
adviser and the Registrar two quarters prior to the expected date of 
graduation. 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are generally planned for the fresh- 
man level; courses numbered 200 to 299 are generally planned for the 
sophomore level. 

The following courses are required in all programs leading to the 
degree of Associate in Arts : 

English 101. 102; 201. 202 fin certain terminal programs Eng- 
lish 228 may be substituted for English 102, 201. or 202) : 
History 114, 115; 

Natural sciences (ten quarter hours from biology, chemistiy, 
physics, and physical science) ; 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113, and any three courses num- 
bered in the 200's. (For exceptions to requirements for physical 
education, see Regulations, p. 35.) 

Knowledge of United States history and government and of Geor- 
gia history and government must be demonstrated in order to receive a 
degree or certificate. (Consult Requirements for Graduation on page 
37. 

Four Year Programs Leading to the 
Bachelor's Degree 

For the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science or the Bachelor 
of Business Administration degree, a minimum of 185 quarter hours, 
exclusive of physical education, will be required for graduation. 



40 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Bachelor of Arts Degree: Total Requirements 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, the minimum 
requirements in the various fields of study will be: 
I. Humanities 

A. English Composition 10 

B. Literature of the Western World 20 

C. Foreign Language 10-20 

D. Fine Arts 5 



45-55 
n. Social Studies 

A. History of Civilization 10 

History of the United States 10 

B. Political Science: American Government 5 

C. Three courses from at least two of the following fields: 

Anthropolgy 

Economics 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology - 15 

40 
in. Natural Sciences 

A. Mathematics (algebra) 5 

Logic or Mathematics 5 

B. Laborator>' Science - 10 

20 

IV. Major Field -- 30-40 

V Closely related fields (300 and 400 courses) 25-35 

VI. Electives - 10-30 

VII. Physical Education - 6 

Bachelor of Science Degree: Total Requirements 

For irraduation with the degree of Bachelor of Science, the mini- 
mum requirements in the various fields of study will be: 
I. Humanities 

A. English Composition 10 

B. Literature of the Western World 10 

C. Foreign Language 10-15 

30-35 
II. Social Science 

A. History of Civilization 10 
Histor>- of the United States 5 

B. Political Science: American Gcvernment 5 

C. Two courses from two of the following fields: 

Anthropology 

Economics 

Philosophy 

Psychology 

Sociology 10 

30 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 41 



III. Xatural Sciences 

A. Mathrinatics (algebra and triy;onomctry) 10 

B. Laboratory Science 20 

30 

I\'. Major 30-40 

W Closclv related fields 25-35 

\"I. Electives 5-20 

\'II. Physical Education , 6 

Bachelor of Business Administration Degree: Total Requirements 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Business Admin- 
istration the minimum requirements in the various fields of study will 

1h' : 

I. Humanities 

A. English Composition . 10 

B. Literature of the Western World 10 

20 
IL Social Sciences 

A. History of Civilization 10 

History of the United States 5 

B. Political Science: American Government 5 

20 
HL Natural Sciences 

A. Mathematics (algebra) 5 

Logic or Finite Mathematics 5 

B. Laboratory Science . 10 

20 
Electives from the Humanities, the Social Sciences, or 
Natural Sciences 15 

IV. Freshman and Sophomore Business Administration 
requirements: 

Business Correspondence 5 

Principles of Accounting 10 

Principles of Management 5 

Principles of Economics 10 

Economic History of the United States 5 

35 
V. Junior core requirements: 

Business Law 5 

Corporation Finance 5 

Marketing 5 

Statistics 5 

Money and Banking 5 

Government and Business 5 

Labor Economics 5 

35 



42 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



\'I. Major Concentration . 30 

1. Accounting 
Inttrmediate Accounting 
Cost Accounting 

Tax Accounting 
Auditing 

Accounting Systems 
Business Law 

2. Business Education 

3. Economics 

Intermediate Economic Theory 
Advanced Economic Theory 
Investments 

Business Cycles 

Comparative Economic Systems 

Monetary Theory 

International Trade 

Contemporary Economic Problems 

Vn. Free Electives 10 

185 



f 



SENIOR C0LLK(;K IM<KI^\RA'K)K^■ I'KOCKAMS 43 



SENIOR colm:(;i: pkkpakatoky 

PROGRAMS 



Business Adiiiiiiistration (1) 



First Year 



English 101, 102 10 

History 114. 115 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 . 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Mathematics 101 5 

Mathematics 103 5 

Business Administration 115 5 



TOTAL 



48 



Second Year 



English 201, 202 10 

Physical Education . . 3 

Business Administration 101, 102 . 10 

Economics 101, 102 10 

Political Science 113 5 

Business Administration 260 5 

Elective . 5 



TOTAL 



48 



Chemistry (30) 
First Year 

Chemistry 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 104 5 

Mathematics 101, 102 10 

Mathematics 104 5 

English 101, 102 : 10 

Political Science 113 5 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

Chemistry 280a, 280b .^ 7 

Mathematics 201, 202 10 

History 114, 115 10 

English 201, 202 10 

Physics 204, 205, 206 15 

{or 207, 208, 209 18) 

Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 55 



Engineering (2) 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for most types of 
engineering. The courses required for the freshman year have been 
planned in consuhation with the Georgia Institute of Technology. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102 10 English 201, 202 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 . 3 Physical Education 3 

lemistry 101, 102 10 Mathematics 201, 202, 203 15 

: ithematics 101, 102, 104 15 Physics 207, 208, 209 18 

lemistry 104 5 History 114, 115 10 

^nneering 113, 114, 115 6 Political Science 113 5 

TOTAL 49 TOTAL 61 



44 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Forestry (3) 

A one-year program for students in Forestr)'. 

English 101, 102 . 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

Botany 121, 122 10 

Economics 101 5 

Engineering 101 2 

Mathematics 101, 102 10 

Physics 204 or Physical Science 101 5 

Political Science 113 5 



TOTAL 



50 



Industrial Management (5) 



This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first two 
years of this field of engineering. 

First Year Second Year 



112, 113 



10 

5 

3 

10 

Chemistry 104 . 5 

Engineering 113, 114, 115 6 



English 101, 102 

History 114 

Physical Education 111, 
Chemistry 101, 102 



English 201, 202 

Physical Education 

History 115 

Business Administration 101, 102 

Economics 101, 102 

Mathematics 103 



10 
3 
5 

10 

10 

5 



Mathematics 101, 102, 104 15 Physics 204, 205, 206 15 



TOTAL 



54 



TOTAL 



58 



Liberal Arts (6) 

This program is recommended for candidates for the A.B. degree, 
pre-education, pre-law, pre-ministerial, journalism, social work, and 
other pre-professional concentrations. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113.. 3 

^Science 10 

Mathematics 101 5 

Mathematics 102 — 5 

♦Foreign Language 10 



TOTAL 



53 



Second Year 



English 201, 202 10 

Physical Education 3 

Science with laboratory 10 

Two of the following courses — 

History 225 

Political Science 113 

Psychology 201 

Sociology 201 

Economics 101 

Philosophy 110 10 

Electives 10 



TOTAL 43 



■"A student applying for admission to a senior college which does not require the 
amount indicated of this subject may, with the approval of his adviser, substi- 
tute other courses required by the senior institution during the first two years. 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGAMS 



45 



Mallu'iiialics (7) 

A piograni designed iov tliosc students who wish to major in 
mathematics. 



First Year 




English 101, 102 

History 114, 115 

Physical Educadon 111, 112, 113 

Chemistry or Biology 

Mathematics 101 

Mathematics 102 

Mathematics 104 


10 
10 

10 
5 
5 
5 


TOTAL 


48 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 
Mathemadcs 201, 202, 203 
Mathematics 235 

Physical Education 

Physics 207, 208, 209 

Elcctivcs 

TOTAL 



10 

15 

5 

3 

10 

5 



48 



Medical Technology (8) 

This program is designed for those students who desire a Bachelor 
of Science degree in Medical Technology. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 

Zoology 124, 226 

Mathematics 101, 102 

Chemistry 101, 102, 104 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113. 



10 
10 
10 
15 
3 



TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 

Zoology 230 

History 114, 115 

French or German 101-102 . 

*Electives 

Physical Education 



10 
6 
10 
10 
10 
3 



TOTAL 



49 



Music (38) 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Physical Education 3 

Applied Music 6 

Music Theory 110, 111, 112 9 

Electives 10 

TOTAL 48 



It is recommended that Zoology 225 be taken as an elective course. 



46 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Physical Education (9) 
First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

Histor>' 114, 115 10 

Physical Education 111. 112, 113 3 

Zoology 124, 225 10 

Home Economics 232 — Nutrition . 5 

Mathematics 9 or 101 5 

*Electives 5 



TOTAL 



48 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 10 

Physical Education 3 

Zoology 108. 109 10 

♦♦Physical Education 203 2 

Physical Education 114 2 

Psychology 201 5 

Psychology 202 5 

Sociology 202 5 

Electives 6 

TOTAL 48 



Physics (10) 

A program designed for those students who wish to major in 
Physics. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 English 201. 202 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 . 3 Physical Education 3 

Chemistry 101. 102. 104 15 Mathematics 201. 202. 203 15 

Mathematics 101 5 Physics 207, 208. 209 18 

Mathematics 102 5 History 114. 115 10 

Mathematics 104 5 Political Science 113 5 

Engineering 113. 114. 115 6 

■ TOTAL 61 

TOTAL 49 



Pre-prof essional : Dentistry (11) 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themseh'es for the study of Dentistry after completing three or more 
vears of academic studies. 



First Year 



Second Year 



10 
10 

6 

10 
10 

3 

49 



♦It is rccommendtd that English 228 be taken as an elective course. 
♦♦The student is exempt from this course if he has a Red Cross "Senior Life 
Saving Certificate." 
♦♦♦It is recommended that Zoology 225 be taken as an elective course. 



English 101. 102 


10 


English 201. 202 


Zoology 124. 226 


10 


History 114. 115 


Mathematics 101. 102 


10 


Zoology 230 


Chemistry 101. 102. 104 


15 


French or German 101. 102 


Physical Education 111. 112, 113 


3 


♦♦♦Electives 
Physical Education 


TOTAL 


48 






TOTAL 



SENION COLLEGE PREPARAT()I<^ nu:)GRAMS 47 



l*re-professioiial: jMrdicinc (12) 

Tliis program is dcsigiuHi tor those students wlio wish to j)r('[j.'uc 
thciiiscKcs for tlic study of nu'diciiu* after conipletinL; tliicc or more 
years of academic studies. 

First Year Second Year 



Enulish 101, 102 


10 


English 201, 202 


10 


Zooloqv 124. 226 


10 


Zoolo.gy 230 


6 


Chemistry 101, 102, 104 


15 


French or German 101, 102 


10 


Mathematics 101, 102 


10 


History 114, 115 


10 


Physical Education 111, 112, 113 


S 


*Electi\'es . .. 


10 




Physical Education 


3 



TOTAL 48 

TOTAL 49 

Pre-prof essional : Nursing (13) 

This is a one year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a school of nursing 
offering the B.S. degree. The program as outlined is intended to satisfy 
the requirements of the Medical College of Georgia School of Nursing. 
Students planning to transfer credits are urged to consult the pre-nurs- 
ing advisor in order to be sure that they are taking the proper courses. 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Zoology 108, 109 10 

Chemistry 101 5 

Sociology 201 5 

Psychology 201 5 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

TOTAL 48 

Pre-prof essional : Optometry (14) 

The requirements for admission to the schools and colleges of 
optometry in the United States are relatively uniform but are not iden- 
tical. The practice of optometry in all states is regulated by Boards of 
Examiners in Optometry. The following concentration will prepare a 
student for transfer to any school or college of optometry in the United 
States and Canada. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 English 201, 202 10 

History 114, 115 10 Zoology 230 6 

Zoology 124, 226 10 Mathematics 102, 104 10 

Chemistry 101, 102 10 Sociology 201 5 

Mathematics 101 5 Psychology 201 5 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 . 3 Electives 10 

Physical Education 3 



TOTAL 48 



TOTAL 49 



*It is recommended that Zoology 225 be taken as an elective course. 



48 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Pre-prof essional : Pharmacy (15) 

This is a two-year concentration for those students who wish to 
obtain their freshman requirements for entrance to a school of phar- 
macy. The regional schools of pharmacy require three years minimum 
in residence at the School of Pharmacy. 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Pharmacy after completing tvvo years of 
academic studies. All students of Pharmacy are required to complete 
a five-year program, two of which are in Pre- Pharmacy and three in 
an accredited School of Pharmacy. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 English 201. 202 10 

Histor>' 114, 115 10 Economics 101 5 

Mathematics 101. 102 10 Political Science 113 5 

Chemistry 101. 102. 104 . .- 15 Physics 204 . 5 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 Zoology 124. 225, 226 15 

• Electives 5 

TOT.\L 48 Physical Education 3 



TOT\L 48 



Pre-veterinary Medicine (16) 

This is a four quarter program designed for those students who 
wish to transfer their credits to the University of Georgia School of 
Veterinary Medicine, which is the regional school. A student planning 
to spend four quarters at Armstrong should consult Veterinary' School 
officials about his program. 

English 101, 102, 201 15 

Botany 121, 122 ....- 10 

Zoology 225, 226 10 

Chemistr>- 101, 102 10 

Mathematics 101, 102 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

TOTAL 58 



Teaching (17) 

The subjects required in the freshman and sophomore years by 
colleges preparing teachers are : English, histor\', mathematics, sciences, 
social studies and physical education. 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 



49 



First Year 

En-lish 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Biolo'j;ioal or Physical Science 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 . 3 

Political Science 113 5 

Art 101 or Music 200 5 

♦Electives 5 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

Education 201 5 

English 201, 202 10 

Mathematics 9 or 101 5 

Physical Education 3 

Psychology 201 5 

*Electives 20 



TOTAL 



48 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 



Business Administration: Accounting (18) 



First Year 



Business Administration 

English 101, 102 

History 114, 115 

Natural Science 

Physical Education 111, 
Elective 


101, 

Ti2,' 


102 
I'l's' 


10 
10 
10 
10 
3 


TOTAL 






- 


48 



Second Year 

Business Administration 201T, 

202T 10 

English 201, 202, 

228 (any two) 10 

Economics 101, 102 10 

Business Administration 260 5 

Business Administration 115 5 

Physical Education 3 

Electives 5 



TOTAL 



48 



A student who desires further training in this field may enroll for 
additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will be 
awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

Business Administration 236T, 237T — Income Tax Accounting 10 

Business Administration 229T — Cost Accounting 5 

Business Administration 207T, 208T 10 

Electives chosen from Business Administration, Economics or 

Industrial Technology courses 20 



TOTAL 45 

Business Administration: General (20) 



First Year 

English 101, 102 - 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Business Administration 101, 102.. 10 

Natural Science 10 

Business Administration 260 5 

Physical Education 1 11, 112, 113.. 3 



Second Year 



10 



Economics 101, 102 

English 201, 202 or English 

201, 228 10 

Business Administration 115 5 

Electives 20 

Physical Education 3 



TOTAL 48 



TOTAL 48 



*Recommended electives for elementary teachers include health, geography, eco- 
nomics, Georgia problems (Social Science 104), English 228 and additional 
science courses. 



50 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

A student who desires further training in this field may enroll for 

additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will be 
awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

Business Administration 207T, 208T 10 

Business Administration 151T 5 

Business Administration 161T 5 

Business Administration 162T 5 

Business Administration 231T 5 

Economics 125T 5 

Economics 126 5 

Economics 127T 5 

Economics 1 28T 5 

Economics 129T 5 

Economics 1 30T 5 

Economics 133 5 

Economics 132T 5 

Students interested in the field of Industrial Management may 

substitute 15 hours in the Industrial Technology' Curriculum from the 
following courses: 

IT 120 3 

IT 1 2 1 3 

IT 122 3 

IT 123 3 

IT 124 3 

IT 127 3 

IT 128 3 



Business Administration : Transportation (21) 
First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 English 201. 202 or English 228 

History 114, 115 10 and Business Administration 1 15 10 

Business Administration 15 IT 5 Natural Science 10 

Business Administration 152T 5 Business Administration 155T 5 

Business Administration 153T 5 Business Administration 101, 102.. 10 

Economics 101. 102 10 Anv two of the following courses — 

Bus. Adm. 207T 

TOTAL 45 Econs. 125T 

Econs. 126 

Econs. 128T 

Econs. 129T 

Econs. 130T 

Bus. Admin. 260 

10 

TOTAL 45 



TERMINAL PKOCkAMS 51 



Students drsiriiig luithcr tiainini; in this ncncial licld may select 
five other siil)jects Hsted under tlie Business Administration: (ien(!ral 
(20). A cerliticatc will be awarded ujjon completion of 45 liours addi- 
tional ^vork. 



Transportation (22) 

Students may receixe a certificate upon request to the Registrar 
after satisfactory completion of the following program : 

B.A. 151T 5 

B.A. 152T 5 

B.A. 153T 5 

B.A. 155T 5 

Economics 101, 102 10 

English 101, 102 or English 228 and B.A. 115 10 

Any two of the following courses: 10 

Business Administration 207T 

Economics 125T 

Economics 126 

Economics 128T 

Economics 129T 

Economics 130T 

Business Administration 260 



TOTAL „ 50 



Business Administration: One-Year Program (23) 

A one year program in Business Administration (with emphasis on 
business courses) for those persons who may not wish to complete the 
two-year concentration. A certificate will be awarded upon request 
to the Registrar to those who successfully complete the program. 

Business Administration 101, 102 10 

Business Administration 115 5 

Business Administration 260 5 

Economics 101, 102 10 

English 5 

Mathematics 5 

Physical Education 3 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 48 



Commerce: Secretarial (24) 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for secretarial positions in business. If, because of prior 
training, a student is permitted by the instructor to omit the beginning 



52 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

theoiT courses in shorthand or typing, the student must choose elective 
subjects to supplement the total college hours required. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 Business Administration 101 5 

History 114, 115 10 Business Administration 1 15 .. 5 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 . 3 English 201, 202, or English 

Natural Science 10 201, 228 10 

Commerce 101, 102, 103 6 Commerce 213 . 5 

Commerce 111, 112, 113 9 Commerce 201, 202, 203 6 

Commerce 211, 212 6 

TOTAL 48 Physical Education 3 

Electives 8 



TOTAL 48 

Coininerce: Stenographic (25) 

A student who has only one year to spend in college may acquire 
some of the clerical skills which will enable her to secure employment 
as a stenographer or clerk. \Vhether a student will be placed in begin- 
ning theory classes of shorthand or typing will depend upon how much 
previous training she has had in those subjects; a more advanced stand- 
ing must be approved by the instructor. A certificate is awarded upon 
completion of the following program. 

Commerce 101, 102, 103 6 

Commerce 111, 112, 113 9 

Commerce 213 5 

Business Administration 101 5 

English 101, 102 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

Business Administration 115 5 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 48 

Human Relations^ (27) 

The Terminal sequence in Human Relations is designed to start 
with the student's immediate interests in learning, methods of study 
and aptitude measurement. The next course, on principles and facts 
about the individual's growth, needs, feelings and learning about the 
world around him is followed by a practical appHcation through ex- 
periments or projects using the objective methods of psychology'. This 
leads to a study of a person's relationship to his social groups, a study 
of marriage and family adjustments, principles and facts about the way 
that our society is organized and finally to a practical study of needs 



•Students in other concentrations may elect any Psycholog>' or Sociolog>' course 
in this program without adhering to the above sequence. Prerequisites are 
necessar\- in Ps>chology 202. Psychology- 203. and Psychology 205. 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 53 



and resources for human adjustment in our conununity. A student wlio 
completes this sequence should have a basic understanding of himself 
and others that will improve his effectiveness in his family, his work 
(whether in the home or employed elsewhere), his social relationships 
and his responsible participation in community living. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 English 201, 202 10 

History 114, 115 10 Biology 124, 225 or Biology 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113.. 3 101, 102 10 

Mathematics 9 or 101 5 Physical Education 3 

Political Science 113 5 Sociology 202 5 

Psychology 100 5 Psychology 203 5 

♦Psychology 201 5 Sociology 201 5 

Psychology 202 5 Sociology 203T 5 

Elective 5 



TOTAL 48 



TOTAL 48 



Liberal Arts (28) 

A student in the Terminal Liberal Arts program may select the 
remainder of his electives from any courses offered by the college in 
order to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 English 201, 202 10 

History 114, 115 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113.. 3 **Electives 35 

Natural Science 10 

Mathemadcs 9 or 101 5 TOTAL 48 

**Electives 10 



TOTAL 48 

A student who desires further training in this field may enroll for 
additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will be 
awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

History 225 5 

Philosophy 110 5 

Select 20 hours from the following 20 

French, German, Spanish, or Russian 

Two additional laboratory (double) or mathematics courses 

Electives 15 

TOTAL 45 



*The sequence of Psychology 201, 202 represents Introductory Psychology. 
**A student must elect 20 hours from at least three of the following subjects: 
Foreign Language, Political Science, Economics, Fine Arts, Philosophy, Psy- 
chology, Sociology, Mathematics (other than Mathematics 103). 



54 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 

LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF ASSOCL\TE IN SCIENCE 

Armstrong Collcuc offers two terminal two-year programs in tech- 
nical fields: Chemical Technology and Industrial Technology. They 
are offered in cooperation with the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion: the basic courses are taught at Armstrong College by the res:ular 
faculty: the advanced technical courses are conducted at the plant of 
the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corporation by fully qualified company 
personnel. Excellent shop, laboratory and class-room facilities are a\ail- 
able. These courses are fully accredited by Armstrong College and are 
not restricted to employees of the company. 

Tuition for Technical Institute courses taught at Armstrong Col- 
lesre is the same as for other evening: prog-ram courses. Tuition for the 
courses conducted at the Union Bag-Camp Paper plant is $1.00 per 
credit hour, payable to Armstrong College. 

Classes are scheduled whenever possible with duplicate or extra 
sessions to accommodate shift workers with rotating work hours. 

Basic subjects required in all technical programs: 

English 100 or 101 (depending on placement test) 5 

Math 101 - - : 5 

Math 102 - 5 

Physics, 204, 205. 206 15 

Engineering 1 13 -. 2 

Psychology 204T ^ 5 

(or IT 128T 3) 

GT 113 3 

GT 112 3 

(or English 228 5) 



Chemical Tecliiiolo«:y (31) 

The curriculum for Chemical Technology has been designed to 
meet the needs of the chemical, paper and other related heavy indus- 
tries for competent and well-trained technicians. The program gives 
the student a working knowledge of the fundamental branches of for- 
mal chemistrv aiul ( honiical engineering. 



TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 55 

Industries arc placing greater emphasis every year on instrumental 
methods ot analysis which are far mort^ riu:id and precise than formal 
chemical methods. The student completing the curriculum in Chemical 
Technology' will acquire training in the theory and use of these elec- 
tronic, optical and thermal instruments. 

Positions open to graduates are assistant to research personnel, 
control chemist, assistant to chemical engineers, analyst and pilot plant 
assistant, as well as many others. 

Chemistr>' 101 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 102 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 104 Qualitative Inorganic Analysis 5 

Engineering 114 Enginccrine: Graphics 2 

Chemistry 280a Quantitative Inorganic Analysis 4 

Chemistry 280b Quantitative Inorganic Analysis 3 

♦GT 111 Industrial Safety 1 /2 

♦Civ. T. 120 Elementary Industrial Statistics 3 

*GT 121 Experimental Design 3 

*Civ. T. 160 Material Balances 3 

*Civ. T. 161 Energy Balances 3 

*CT 162 Elementary Chemical Processes 4 

♦CT 165 Industrial'Chemistry 4 



45/2 



In addition, the student will select one of the two options listed 
below, either paper and pulp or chemical. 



Pulp & Paper Option 

*CT 140 — Basic Wood Technology, Pulping, Pulp Preparation, and 

Pulp Testing. Part I 4 

♦CT 141— Part II 4 

♦CT 142 — Paper Making, Paper Converting, and Paper Testing, Part I . 4 

♦CT 143— Part II 4 

♦CT 164 — Wood Structure and Properties 4 



20 



Chemical Option 



Engineering 115 — Engineering Graphics 2 

Mathematics 114 — Slide Rule 2 

♦CT 150— Organic Chemistry 5 

♦CT 151 — Industrial Chemical Analysis 3 



17 

♦These courses will be taught in the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 



Civ. 


T 


212 


Civ. 


T 


213 


Civ. 


T 


223 


Civ. 


T 


224 


Civ. 


T 


232 


Civ. 


T 


241 



56 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Civil Technology (34) 

Civil Technology covers one of the broader fields in the Technical 
Institute Program. The civil technician is a surveyor, a construction 
man on buildings of all kinds, highways and railroads, hydroelectric 
projects, locks, dams, tunnel and similar projects. He is trained to 
handle work in any of these fields with a minimum of supervision. 

BCT 142 Construction Materials and Estimates 5 

Civ. T 121 Elementary Surveying 6 

Civ. T 122 Route Surveying 5 

Civ. T 131 Highway Construction .• 3 

Civ. T 143 Mechanics of Materials 6 

BCT 211 Wood and Steel Construction 5 

BCT 212 Concrete Construction 5 

Structural Drafting I 2 

Structural Drafting II 2 

Land Surveys 5 

Topographic and Contour Surveying 4 

Heavy Construction 4 

Hydraulics 6 

58 

Industrial Technology (32) 

The curriculum in Industrial Technology' is designed to enable the 
graduate to compete successfully for a variety of supervisory and man- 
agement positions in manufacturing industries. These positions are in 
such categories as personnel work, quality control, methods and cost 
control, and the equipment, planning and production functions. The 
graduate will also be qualified for many staff positions with transpor- 
tation, distributing and utility companies, and for the operation of pri- 
vate business. 

Economics 101 Principles and Problems of Economics 5 

Economics 102 Principles and Problems of Economics 5 

Economics 128T Principles of Marketing 5 

Business Adm. 101 Principles of Accounting 5 

Engineering 114 Engineering Graphics 2 

Engineering 115 Engineering Graphics 2 

Chemistry 101 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 102 General Inorganic 5 

*GT 111 Industrial Safety l/a 

*IT 120 Manufacturing Processes 3 

*IT 121 Production Organization 3 

♦IT 122 Economic Analysis 3 

♦IT 123 Production and Cost Control 3 

♦IT 124 Time and Motion Study 3 

♦IT 125 Mechanical Methods 2 

♦IT 126 Advanced Time and Motion Study 3 

♦IT 127 Data Presentation 3 

♦IT 128 Personnel Motivation 3 



61/2 



♦These courses will be taught at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 



Course Descriptions 

Armstrong College resei-ves the right to ( 1 ) withdraw any course 
for wliich less than ten students register, (2) limit the enrollment in 
any course or class section, (3) fix the time of meeting of all classes 
and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as demand and 
faculty warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in languages where 
the same or similar courses have been presented for admission from 
high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed, 
for example: Zoology 101-102. 

Economics and Business Administration courses marked with a T 
are terminal courses, and do not transfer to the University of Georgia. 
Technical Institute courses transfer only to another Technical Insti- 
tute. 

After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture; the second, 
the number of hours of laboratory; and the third, the number of quar- 
ter hours of credit the course carries. For example: Botany 121 — Gen- 
eral Botany (3-4-5). 

Art 

Art 101 — Creative Art (3-4-5). Spring. 

Drawing, painting and design principles, with some pertinent back- 
ground histor)'. Introductory practice in techniques, and application 
to every day life needs. 

Art 1\3— Ceramics (5-0-5). 

A beginner's course in the fundamentals of pottery and clay mod- 
eling. Various ways of forming clay, decorating, glazing and firing 
suitable subjects. 

Art 114 — Ceramics (5-0-5). 

A continuation of the beginner's course with emphasis on design, 
using the potter's wheel and understanding the use of glazes. Work 
may be developed in pottery or clay sculpture. 

Art 290 — Introduction to the History of Art (5-0-5). 

The formal characteristics of the painting, sculpture, architecture 
and some of the minor arts will be analyzed in their stylistic and sym- 
bolic developments which will be discussed in relation to the changing 
cultural backgrounds. 



58 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Art 291 — Introduction to the History of Modern Art (5-0-5). 

A suney of world art during the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twen- 
tieth centuries. The formal characteristics of the painting, sculpture, 
architecture and some of the minor arts will be analyzed in their styl- 
istic and symbolic developments which will be discussed in relation to 
the changing cultural backgrounds. 

Biology 

Biology 210 — Microbiology (3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisites: ten 
hours of a biological science with laboratory and five hours of inor- 
ganic chemistry. 

An introductoin to the study of micro-organisms with primary 
emphasis on bacteria. The morphology-, life history, and public health 
importance of representative bacteria, molds, viruses, protozoa, and 
helminths are considered. 

Bota?iy 121— General Botany (3-4-5). Fall. 

A study of the structure of the roots, stems, and leaves, basic 
physiolog\- and ecolog)- of plants. Laboratory work on representative 
species. 

Botany 122 — General Botany (3-4-5). Spring. Prequisite: Botany 
121. 

A study of reproduction, heredity, and evolution of seed plants, 
with studies of representative species of the other major plant groups. 
Laboratory work includes field trips. 

Zoology 101-102— Human Biology (10-0-10). Fall and Winter. 
Four lectures and one demonstration period. 

A basic course intended to acquaint the student with biological 
principles and their application to the human organism. The second 
quarter is a continuation of the first: no credit is allowed toward 
graduation imtil the sequence is completed. 

Zoology 108-109 — Human Anatomy and Physiology (6-8-10). 
Winter and Spring. 

A basic course considering the gross anatomy, histology', and 
physiology of the organ systems. Laboraton.' work includes thorough 
dissection of a typical mammal as well as basic experiments in physi- 
ology-. The second quarter is a continuation of the first: no credit 
is allowed toward irraduation imtil the sequence is completed. Not 
open to pre-professional students in the biological sciences. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 59 

Zoolo'^y 124 — General Zoolooy (3-4-5). Fall and Sprins^. Prc- 
reciuisitc: Hii^h school chcmistiy is strongly recommended. Not open 
to students luu'ing credit for Zooloi^- 101-102. 

A siiney of principles in biolog\-, with accent upon cellular phe- 
nomena. 

Zooloiix 225 — Invertebrate Zoolooy (3-4-5 j. Winter. Prerecjui- 
site Zoolog\- 124, or Zoology- 101-102,^ or Botany 121-122. 

A sur\ey of the invertebrate animals, their biology, structure, and 
relation to other animals. 

Zoology 226 — l^ertebrate Zoology 3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Zoology- 124 or 101-102, or Botany 121-122. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and na- 
tural histoiy of the vertebrate animals. 

Zoology 230 — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-6-6). Fall. 
Prerequisite: Zoology 226. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of 
the vertebrates. 

Business Administration 

Business Administration 101 — Principles of Accounting, Introduc- 
tory (5-0-5). Fall, Winter and Spring. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of 
accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, working 
papers, accounting, statements, controlling accounts, special journals 
and the voucher system. 

Business Administration 102 — Principles of Accounting, Introduc- 
tory (5-0-5). \Vinter and Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 101. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of financial state- 
ments. 

Business, Administration 115 — Business Correspondence (5-0-5). 
Winter and Spring. 

Covers various aspects of business and technical report writing. 
Attention is given to vocabulary building, a review of the mechanics 
of grammar, and techniques of business writing. Letter studies include: 
sales, credit, collection, promotion, application, routine, personal, and 
formal. Information relative to effective policies in these areas is con- 
sidered. 



60 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Business Administration 15 IT — Introduction to Transportation 
(5-0-5). Fall. 

Histor)' of transportation; development leading to legislative 
supervision of railroads; developments leading to Federal regulation 
of carriers, other than railroads; freight classifications; principles of 
freight rates and tariff. 

Business Administration 152T — Elementary Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 15 IT or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Shipping documents and their application; special freight serv- 
ices; freight claims, overcharge and loss and damage; freight tariff 
circulars; construction and filing of tariffs; terminal facilities and 
switching; and demurrage. 

Business Administration 153T — Advanced Rates and Tariffs 

(5-0-5). Prerequisite: B.A. 152T or permission of instructor. 

Through routes and rates, overcharges and undercharges, loss 
and damage, import and export traffic, Rate and Classification Com- 
mittee procedure. 

Business Administration 155T — Regulation of Transportation 

(5-0-5). 

Evolution, construction and intepretation of the Interstate Com- 
merce Act; creation and organization of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission; practice before the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
general review. 

Business Administration 161T — Principles of Insurance (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 102. 

A comprehensive treatment of the insurance field: an explana- 
tion of the different types of insurance and fundamental underlying 
principles, the organization of the insurance business and accepted 
insurance practices. 

Business Administration 162T — Real Estate Principles (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 102. 

A consideration of the general principles of property utilization, 
the law dealing with ownership, transfer of title and liens; the ap- 
praisal process, determinants of values, the real estate cycle, manage- 
ment and salesmanship and regulatory legislation. 

Business Administration 201T — Principles of Accounting, Inter- 
mediate (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 102. 

Basic accounting theory and the solution of problems requiring an 
application of accounting theory. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 61 

Business Administration 202T^ — I ntci mediate Accounting (5-0-5). 
Second course. Prerequisite: Business Administration 201T. 

A continuation of Business Administration 20 IT emphasizing the 
theories of valuation of fixed assets and liability accounts, the appli- 
cation of these theories and the interpretation of financial statements 
prepared on the basis of these theories. 

Business Administration 207T — Business Law (5-0-5). Fall. 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the following 
subjects. Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, 
rights of third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agency, 
liabilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of 
negotiability, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 

Business Administration 208T — Business Law (5-0-5). Spring. 

The law governing the basic legal principles applicable to the fol- 
lowing subjects which are of particular interest to those planning to 
major in accounting. Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of 
partners, tennination. Corporation: formation, power rights of se- 
curity holders, types of securities. Sales: vesting of title, warrants, 
remedies. 

Business Administration 229T — Cost Accounting (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 101, 102. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing, 
including the job order and the process methods. 

Business Administration 231T — Retailing (5-0-5). 

Basically a course in merchandising and promotion. Retailing 
also covers allied services such as stock and inventory control, ac- 
counting systems, mark-ups, and materials handling. A review is given 
on the basic elements of salesmanship and modern trends. Store de- 
sign, the effects of lighting, color dynamics, traffic and aisle display 
are illustrated. Delineation of the various advertising media is also 
involved. 

Business Administration 236T — Income Tax Accounting. Fall. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 102. 

A study of federal income tax laws and the application of these 
laws to the income tax returns of individuals, partnerships and 
corporations. 

Business Administration 237T — Tax Accounting (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 236T. 

A continuation of Business Administration 236T with emphasis 
on corporations and fiduciary returns and social security taxes, gift 
, taxes and estate taxes. 



62 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Business Administration 260 — Principles of Management (5-0-5). 

Designed to prepare students in the fundamentals of all phases 
of administrative, staff and operative management. Successful man- 
agement principles and techniques are given for all fields of business 
which include: business objectives, policies, functions, executive lead- 
ership, organization structure and morale, cooperative procedure and 
control procedure. 



Chemistry 

Chemistry 101 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Fall and Winter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 9, or consent of instructor. 

A study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry 
through the modern concept of the atom, with a quantitative approach 
to the laws. The lab consists of one three hour period per week empha- 
sizing fundamental techniques as applied to the beginning experiments. 

Chemistry 102 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 101. 

This is a continuation of Chemistry 101 with emphasis on de- 
scriptive chemistry of particular elements, families and groups, in- 
cluding some organic chemistry. The lab follows with a study of the 
properties and preparations. One three hour lab per week. 

Chemistry 104 — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). Spring 
and Fall. Prerequisite: Chemistry 102. 

The lecture is devoted to the study of theoretical principles of 
chemical equilibrium and application to qualitative analysis. Lab is 
a systematic study of the separation and identification of common 
cations and anions by semi-micro techniques. 

Chemistry 105 — Chemistry for Nurses (4-2-5). Fall. Principles 
of inorganic, organic, and physiological chemistry with special appli- j 
cation to nursing practice. 

Chemistry 280a — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (2-6-4). Win- 
ter. Prerequisite: Chemistry 104 or approval of the instructor. 

A study of the fundamental theories and applications of quanti- 
tative analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods. No 
credit is given for this course before completion of Chemistry 280b. 

Chemistry 2^^h — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (1-6-3). 
Spring. Prerequisite: ChemistiT 280a or its equivalent. 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 280a, with special 
topics in instrumental methods. 



COURSE DESCRIIM IONS 63 



Coiiiiiierce 

(.'ommt-rct' 101 — Bcginnhio Typing (0-5-2). Fall, \\intcr and 
Spring. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper tech- 
nique and mastery of the keyboard. 

Commerce 102 — Beginning Typing Continued ^0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. 

This course is a cor.tinuation of speed development. In addition, 
instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulations is given. 

Commerce 103 — Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 101-102 or equivalent. 

A typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed build- 
ing and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, 
minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce 111 — Begijinin::^ Shorthand (5-0-3) Fall. Complete 
theoiy of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Reading dictation and transcrip- 
tion from studied material. A dictation speed of 80 words a minute is 
attained. 

Commerce 112 — Beginning Shorthand (Continued) (5-0-3) Win- 
ter. A continuation of beginning shorthand from foundation learned in 
fall quarter. 

Commerce 113 — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-3). Spring. 
Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of 100 words a minute. 

Commerce 201 — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 103 or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and ac- 
curacy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and 
business papers. Most of the student's work is done on a production 
timing basis. 

Commerce 202 — A continuation of Commerce 201 (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. 

Commerce 203 — A continuation of Commerce 202 (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. An average of 60 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 211 — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-3). Fall. Prerequi- 
sites: Commerce 111, 112, 113 or equivalent. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are ap- 
plied in developing skill and acciuacy in writing shorthand and in 



64 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

transcribing. Dictating and typing of mailable letters are emphasized. 
A speed of 110 words a minute for five minutes is attained. 

Commerce 212 — A continuation of Commerce 211 (5-0-3). Win- 
ter. A speed of 120 words a minute is required. 

Commerce 213 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 1 1 2 or equivalent or permission of instructor. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible, including the instruction of various business machines. Practical 
problems deal with typing, filing and office courtesy. 



Economics 

Econojnics 101 — Principles and Problems of Economics (5-0-5). 
Fall. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 102 — Principles and Problems of Economics (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Economics 10 L 

A continuation of the study of economic principles and problems 
begun in Economics 10 L 

Economics 125T — Elementary Economic Statistics (5-0-5). 

An introduction to presentation and analysis of quantitative eco- 
nomic data. Statistical sources, table reading, chart making; elemen- 
tary' statistical procedures and their economic interpretation; intro- 
duction to index and time series analysis. 

Economics 126 — American Economic History (5-0-5). 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present with major 
emphasis on the period since 1860. It will deal with agriculture, 
industry, labor, domestic and foreign commerce, transportation, money 
and banking, and finance. 

Economics 127T — Money and Banking (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 102. 

The role of money in the economic organization; monetary 
theory; methods of stabilizing the price level; the integration of finan- 
cial institutions; theory of bank deposits and elasticity of bank cur- 
rency; discount policy and the interest rate of central banks; methods 
of res^ulatins: credit and business activities. 



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HVNMVAVS JO 3031100 ONO^XSW^V 0^ 



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69 sNOixdi'HOsaa as^noo 



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^9 SNOIXdI>I0S3a 3S^noo 



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59 sNoixdmosaa as^rioo 

II 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 81 

Sociolo<>;y 

Sociology 201 — Intioductory Sociology (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, 
Spring and Sunnncr. 

Sociolog)' is the scientific study of human behavior at the group 
level. This course presents material which has been gathered by system- 
atic and objective studies of human society. Material is introduced 
from the fields of cultural anthropolog>' and social psychology. In this 
way an understanding is gained not only of the function of culture as 
a factor in the socialization of the individual but also of the role of the 
individual as a member of his own society. Attention is then turned to 
some of the major institutions of this society, and finally to a theoretical 
consideration of the operation of social processes. 

Sociology 202 — Marriage and the Family (5-0-5) . Winter, Spring. 

This course is designed as a functional approach to the study of 
the problems of marriage in our society. As a background to a study of 
the family as an institution marriage customs and family relationships 
from other cultures are studied. The rest of the course focuses on the 
individual within our own culture. Each stage in the preparation for 
marriage is discussed: dating, courtship, engagement, marriage, adjust- 
ment to money, sex, religion, in-laws, friends and children. A promi- 
nent physician is guest lecturer on specialized information affecting the 
physical adjustment to marriage and parenthood. Other guest lecturers 
include representatives from the legal and insurance professions. In 
this course the student is provided with information which will encour- 
age a mature and objective approach to the problems and responsibili- 
ties inherent in marriage and family relationships in our present-day 
society. 

Sociology 203 — Community and Social Problems (5-0-5). Win- 
ter. Prerequisite: Sociology 201. 

The purpose of this course is to study the facts, problems, and 
programs of community life, using Savannah and Chatham County as 
resources to supplement information from responsible scientific studies 
available in the professional literature. In addition to exploring the 
nature and origins of social problems in general, attention will be di- 
rected to such special areas as community physical and mental health, 
problems of poverty, unemployment, education, government, juvenile 
and adult crime, care for dependent children, housing, recreation, re- 
sources for the aged, problems of community planning, and group con- 
flicts. The course will include seminar discussion, individual study 
of some problems of special interest, guest speakers and selected field 
trips. This additional knowledge, understanding and experience with 
systematic study of community life is aimed to contribute to the stu- 
dent's constructive involvement, as a citizen, in the life of his com- 
munity. 



82 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Spanish 

Spanish \0\-l02—Elemejitary (10-0-10). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. No 
credit for graduation will be given until sequence is completed. No 
credit will be given for these courses if two years of high school Spanish 
have been completed. 

Spanish 201 — Intermediate (5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Two quarters of college Spanish or two years of 
high school Spanish. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammar, conversation and readings. 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE COURSES 

Courses are designated as follows: 

GT — General Technology for courses which are common to sev- 
eral concentrations. 

CT — Chemical Technology^. 
IT — Industrial Technology. 
Civ. T — Civil Technology. 

General Technology 

*GT in— Industrial Safety (I/2-O-I/2). 

A basic study of industrial accident prevention considering the 
nature and extent of the accident problem. A practical study is given 
the technique for control of industrial hazards together with the funda- 
mentals of good organization. 

*Gr \\2— Public Speaking (3-0-3). Prerequisite: English 101 or 
the equivalent. 

Study and practice in the fundamentals of public speaking. The 
subject includes training in selecting a subject, obtaining and organiz- 
ing material, and presenting speeches effectively. Each student makes 
several speeches before an audience. 

-^"Gr \\3— Technical Report Writing (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Eng- 
lish lOl or the equivalent. 

Study of the fundamentals of technical writing style and mechan- 
ics with practice in preparing reports of various types most likely to be 
used on the job by technicians. 



*Classcs to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



I 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 83 

Biii1(1iii<>; Coiistniction Trrlinoloj^y 

BCT \2\~ Graphics (2-6-5). Piequisite: Engineering 113. 

An introductory study in architectural drawing and the principles 
of visual design. This subject equips the student with a basic knowledge 
of drawing sections, plans, perspcctixe and presentation drawing in ink. 

BCT 142 — Construction Materials and Estimates (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the materials most commonly used in the erec- 
tion of structures, and the preparation of material and labor quantity 
surveys from actual working drawings and specifications. 

BCT 211 — Wood and Steel Construction (3-6-5). Prerequisite: 
Civ. T 143. 

A study of the design of beams, girders and columns in both wood 
and steel. Included is a study of the various timber fasteners, steel and 
timber trusses and steel frameworks. 

BCT 212 — Concrete Construction (3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 
143. 

A study of the properties of reinforced concrete with the determi- 
nation of direct stresses and bending stresses in beams, slabs, girders 
and columns. Laboratory work consists of problems and a study of the 
methods of testing various concrete members. 

BCT 23\— Architectural History (3-0-3). 

A study of the progress of architecture. The material covered in- 
cludes a review of architectural forms from early Egyptian to modern 
Engineered Architecture. 

BCT 243— Building Equipment (3-0-3) . Prerequisite: Physics 206. 

A brief survey of the principles of heating, ventilating, plumbing, 
air-conditioning, lighting and electric wiring of buildings from the 
construction point of view. 



Chemical Technology 

"^CT \20— Introduction to Industrial Statistics (3-0-3). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 101. 

An introduction to the application of statistical analysis to techni- 
cal problems. The concept of distributions is developed, simple tests of 
significance and linear correlation are discussed. Emphasis is placed 
upon the practical application of statistics rather than upon theory. 



*Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



84 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

"^CT \2\— Experimental Design (3-0-3). Prerequisite: CT 120. 

Advanced statistical work, including problems in the determina- 
tion of the proper procedure to be followed in gaining maximum in- 
formation from given data. A study of experimental methods designed 
to produce adequate result data at a minimum expenditure of time 
and money. 

^CjT 140 — Basic Wood Technology: Pulping. Pulp Preparation 
and Pulp Testing, Part I. (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Chemistry 101, 102. 

A brief summary of all commercial pulping processes in use, in- 
cluding a study of wood species, chemicals used, cooking conditions, 
characteristics of pulp, and recovery processes. Also included is a 
thorough study of pulping processes now in widespread use in the 
South, with emphasis on the sulphate pulping of pine. 

^-Cr U\— Basic Wood Technology: Part 11. (2-4-4). 

A comprehensive review of standard mill and laboratory pulp 
testing equipment and procedures. The interrelationships of different 
pulp properties are studied, together with the theoretical and practical 
considerations of permanganate number and other measures of the 
degree of pulping. 

*CT 142 — Paper Making, Paper Converting, and Paper Testing, 
Parti. (4-0-4). Prerequisite: CT 141. 

The study of the function and operation of the various machines 
used for the conversion of pulp to the finished product, including the 
component parts and associated equipment of the fourdrinier machine. 
A survey of the leading types of machines used in the further process- 
ing of paper and paperboard for the production of bags, boxes and 
similar products. 

^CT 143 — Paper Making, Paper Converting, and Paper Testing. 
Part 11. (2-4-4). 

A study of the physical properties of paper and paperboard with 
emphasis on the characteristics commonly tested. Details of the con- 
struction, principle and operation of testing equipment are studied. 

*Cr 150— Organic Chemistry (5-0-5). 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 102 and Chemistry 280b. 

A classroom survey of the type of organic compounds, their names 
-and structures, preparation, properties and reactions, including elec- 
rronic mechanisms involved in the reactions. 

♦Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



COURSE DESLIKIPIIONS 85 

*CT 131- Industrial Chemical Analysis (3-0-3). Prcic(nilsitc: 
Chemistry 280h. 

The application of chemical principles to industrial processes of 
water treatment, paper manufacture, waste disposal, acid manufacture 
and various other related processes in the paper industry. 

*CT 160 — Material Balances (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Mathematics 
101 or GT 114, Chemistry 101, 102, Physics 204, 205, 206. 

This course is designed to give intensive, qualitative training in 
the practical applications of the principles of chemistry and physics to 
the solution of problems associated with industrial chemical processes. 
This portion of the course is mainly concerned with establishing mate- 
rial flows through process, including the development of methods of 
predicting mis-information from generalized principles. 

""CT 161— Energy Balances (3-0-3). Prerequisite: CT 160. 

A continuation of Civ. T 160 to include the energy requirements 
of chemical process. Insofar as possible the problems are related to 
actual data from operation in a kraft paper pulp mill. 

*CT 162 — Elementary Chemical Process (4-0-4). Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 280b, CT 160. 

A study of the transformation of energy and heat transfer, evapo- 
ration, distillation, drying, and flow of fluids. 

^CT 164 — Wood Structures and Properties (3-2-4) . Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 101, 102, Physics 204, 205, 206. 

A course covering the basic process of the formation of wood fibers 
in the living plant and the changes which occur during and after the 
life of the plant. A resume of physical and chemical characteristics of 
southern woods, and the means by which these characteristics may be 
controlled or altered. 

^CT 165 — Industrial Chemistry (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Chemistry. 

The course covers fundamental chemical processes and reactions 
used in the manufacturing of a large variety of chemical compounds. 
It also gives a general view of the problems of the chemical industry. 



Civil Technology 

Civ. T 121 — Elementary Surveying (3-9-6). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 102 or GT 115, or concurrently. 

Construction, care and use of surveying instruments; theory and 
practice of chaining; differential and profile leveling; traversing; com- 

•Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



86 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

putation of areas and earthwork; theory and practice of stadia and its 
application to topographic surveying; U. S. Gov't, system of public land 
surveys; reduction and plotting of field notes; the interpretation and 
plotting of field notes of topographic surveys. 

Civ. T 122— Route Surveying (3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 12L 
Reconnaissance, preliminary location and construction surveys for 
routes of all kinds, including simple, compound and reverse curves used 
on highways and railroads; superelevation of curves; computations of 
earthwork; construction of quantity, mass and haul diagrams. For a 
final project each laboratory group must lay out a complete highway 
location with each student submitting a complete set of plans, profiles, 
cross sections and earthwork computations for this location. 

Civ. T \3\— Highway Construction (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Civ. T 
122. 

A study of highway location, grading, drainage, surfacing, main- 
tenance and administration. 



Civ. T \^Z— Mechanics of Materials (5-3-6). Prerequisites: Phys- 
ics 204 and Mathematics 102 or GT 115. 

A study of coplanar forces and force systems, truss solutions, force 
systems in space, friction and centroids; direct stress, properties of ma- 
terials, riveted and welded joints, torsions stresses in beams, beam de- 
flection, and columns. 

Civ. T 2\2— Structural Drafting I (0-6-2). Prerequisite: Engi- 
neering 113. 

Structural steel framing practices and preparation of shop drawing 
for steel fabrication. 



212, 



Civ. T 2l3Structural Drafting II (0-6-2). Prerequisite: Civ. T 

Preparation of detail drawings for concrete structures. fll 

Civ. T 223— Land Surveys (3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 121. 

Theory and practice of land surveying; sub-divisions; filing and 
recording deeds; U. S. system of land subdivisions. U. S. Coast and 
Geodetic plane coordinate systems; county and state laws; computa- 
tions on astronomical observations for azimuth determination. Georgia 
Land Lot system of land subdivision. 

Civ. T 22A— Topographic and Contour Surveying (2-6-4). Pre- 
requisite: Civ. T 121. 

Theory, description and use of advanced suneying instruments 
and methods; practice of state and local coordinate systems for cadas- 






COURSE DKSCKiniON 87 



tral surveys and construction work; field work for the design and con- 
struction of engineering projects; use of the Plane I'ahle on topo- 
grapliic surveys; theory, description and purposes of the many types of 
maps, plans and profiles used by engineers; hydrographic surveying; 
altimetry. 

Civ. T 232— Heavy Construction (3-3-4). Prerequisite: BCT 142. 

Heavy construction practices. This subject acquaints the student 
with the many common pieces of heavy construction equipment and 
apparatus; operation, use, limitations and maintenance of this equip- 
ment are covered along with the methods, organization and manage- 
ment for both large and small jobs. Fields trips are made to construction 
projects to illustrate the usage of various pieces of equipment. 

Civ. T 2A\— Hydraulics (6-0-6). Prerequisites: Physics 204 and 
Civ. T 143. 

Elementary principles of hydraulics with special emphasis on static 
pressure, flow through pipes, channels, and over weirs. A survey of the 
operation of water and sewage treatment plants is included. Several 
field trips are scheduled. 

Electronics & Communications Technology 

Elec. T 121 — Direct Current Circuits (5-3-6). Prerequisite: GT 
114. 

Fundamental concepts of D-C, including electron theory, Ohm's 
Laws, Thevinin's and Superposition Theorem and other theorems which 
aid in the simplification of networks. A comprehensive study of D-C 
instruments and measurements and their use in the laboratory to deter- 
mine and verify the basic principles of electricity. Laboratory experi- 
ments to coincide with classroom study. 

Elec. T 122 — Alternating Current Circuits I (5-3-6). Prerequi- 
sites: Elec. T 121 and GT lf5. 

The fundamental study of sinusoidal voltages and current wave- 
forms — the resistive, inductive and capacitive circuits along with their 
combinations. Series and parallel networks. A comprehensive study of 
vector analysis and complex notation. Laboratory experiments to coin- 
cide with classroom study and to verify theoretical work — become fa- 
miliar with oscilloscopes. 

Elec. T 131— Basic Electronics (5-3-6). 

Basic study of the control of free electrons in elementary electronic 
circuits. Electron emission, classification and characteristics of high- 
vacuum tubes, tube characteristics curves. Rectification, amplification, 



88 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

amplification factor, trans-conductance plate resistance, load lines, 
stage gain and basic amplifier circuits. Types of bias. Classification and 
characteristics of gas-filled, vapor-filled, and cathode ray tubes. Hard- 
tube and soft-tube voltage regulator circuits. Conversion efficiency, 
ripple factor and circuit analysis of single-phase, half-wave, full-wave 
and bridge rectifier circuits. 

Elec. T 23^— Semiconductors (3-3-4). 

Familiarization of transistors, diodes and other semiconductor de- 
vices. Theory, application and operational characteristics of semicon- 
ductors. Laboratory experiments to include investigation of transistors 
and other semiconductors circuitry and behavior. 

Elec. T 241 — Communications Circuits I (5-3-6). Prerequisite: 
Physics 205. 

Study of the operating principles of telephone equipment and cir- 
cuits. Local-battery and common battery manual exchanges, step-by- 
step and all-relay automatic exchanges. Basic relay circuits for digital 
control. Matched transmission lines for audio frequencies, distributed 
and lumped line constants, pads and attenuators, constant-k and m-de- 
rived filters for low-pass, high-pass, band-pass and band-elimination. 
"Pi", "T", and "LL" sections. 

Elec. T 242 — Communications Circuits II (3-3-4). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 261, or concurrently. 

Micro wave technique concepts and practical applications. Imped- 
ence-matching concepts and methods, transmission-line circle diagram, 
propagation, standing waves, basic antenna theory, antennas for low- 
frequency and high-frequency applications, and high-frequency meas- 
uring techniques, including radar and transmitting and receiving sys 
tems. 



Industrial Technology 

*IT 120 — Manufacturing Processes (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics 101, or Gl' 114, Physics 204. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with machine 
tools and basic manufacturing operations. 

■^/T" 121 — Production Organization (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Eco- 
nomics 101, 102, and IT 120 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in planning for production budgeting, plant location, 
machinery and equipment selection, building and service selection, 
maintenance planning, plant layout, materials handling, storekeeping 
planning, personnel organization, employee selection and training. 

*Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



I 



I 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 89 

*/7' 122^ — Economic Analysis (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Business Ad- 
ministration 101 and YV 121 or approxal of the instructor. 

Problems in economic, financial and intangible analysis. A study 
is made of the technique of making a decision among ahernatives on 
the basis of comparative cost and suitability. A study of ciuality control 
methods is included. 

*/7^ 123 — Production and Cost Control (3-0-3). Prerequisites: 
Business Administration 101 and IT 121 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in factory operation, including scheduling, planning and 
detailed control of production, as well as the analysis and control of 
costs of manufacturing. 

*/r 124— r/m^ and Motion Study (3-0-3). Prerequisites: IT 121 
or approval of the instructor. 

The study of working procedures to determine the best method, 
the best human motions and the time standard or measure of human 
efficiency. 

*77" 125 — Mechanical Methods (0-4-2). Prerequisites: Engineer- 
ing 103, Mathematics 102 or GT 115, IT 124 and Physics 204. 

The course is designed to familiarize the student with machine 
mechanisms and jig and fixture design, including actual designing of 
simple machines, jigs and fixtures. 

*/r 126 — Advanced Time and Motion Study (3-0-3). Prerequi- 
site: IT 124 or approval of the instructor. 

A continuation of IT 124 designed for students specializing in this 
field. 

•^/r \21—Data Presentation (3-0-3). Prerequisite: IT 124 or 
approval of the instructor. (CT 120 may be substituted with consent 
of instructor. ) 

Problems in graphical and numerical analysis of data. Problems in 
presenting data in the most efficient and least costly form in terms of 
time required for use. Simple graphs and charts, alignment charts, 
families of curves and multi-variable charts. 

"/r 128 — Personnel Motivation (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Psychology 
204T. 

The course gives primary consideration to human factors in the 
design, approval and installation of personnel practices, procedures and 
svstems. The case studv method is used. 



*Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



INDEX 

Absences 1)4-35 

Administration 6-7 

Admission to Class 34 

Admission to College 20-22 

Admission by Transfer (Advanced Standing) 22-23 

Admission of Veterans 23-24 

Advisement and Placement Tests 32 

Advisers 32 

Aims 14-15 

Art, Course Descriptions 57-58 

Associate Degree 39 

Athletics 19 

Attendance Regulations 34-35 

Bachelors' Degrees 39-42 

Biology, Course Descriptions. 58-59 

Board of Regents 5 

Botany, Course Descriptions 58 

Business Administration, Course Descriptions 59-62 

Business Administration, Senior College Preparatory 43 

Business Administration, Terminal 49-51 

Business Administration, 1-Year Program 51 

Business Administration, 3-Year Programs: 

Accounting 49 

General 49-50 

Transportation 50-51 

Calendar— 1963-64 : 2-4 

Chemical Technology, Course Descriptions 83-85 

Chemical Technology Programs 54-55 

Chemistry, Course Descriptions 62 

College Commission 6 

College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic Aptitude Test 21 

Commerce, Course Descriptions 63-64 

Commerce, Secretarial, Terminal 51-52 

Commerce, Stenographic 52 

Conduct 34 

Constitution : Examinations 37-38 

Counseling , 16 

Course Load 33-34 

Course Descriptions 57-89 

Curriculums: 

Senior College Preparatory Programs ....43-49 

Technical Institute Programs 54-56 

Terminal Programs 49-53 

Dean's List (See Honors) 36 

Dismissal from College 36-37 

90 



INDEX (CoiiliniKil) 

Dramatics (Masquers) 19 

Economics, (^oiii^se Descriptions 64-65 

Education, C-ourse Descriptions 65-66 

Electronics Tcchnoloii^, C'ourse Descriptions 87-88 

En,u;ineering, Course Descriptions 66 

Engineering, Senior College Preparatory 43 

English, Course Descriptions 66-68 

Entrance Requirements 20-25 

Evening Program .^. 15 

Expenses 26-28 

Faculty 8-12 

Fees 26-29 

Forestry, Senior College Preparatory 44 

French, Course Descriptions 68 

General Educational Development Tests 20 

General Information 14-19 

Geography, Course Descriptions 68 

German, Course Descriptions 69 

Glee Club - 18-19 

Grades 35-36 

Graduation, Requirements for 37-38 

Health, Course Descriptions 69 

History of the College 14 

History, Course Descriptions 69-70 

Hodgson Hall 16-17 

Home Economics Description 70 

Honor Points .'. 35 

Honors 36 

Human Relations, Terminal 52-53 

Industrial Management 44 

Industrial Technology, Course Descriptions 88-89 

Industrial Technology Program 56 

Late Registration Fee 26 

Liberal Arts, Senior College Preparatory 44 

Liberal Arts, Terminal 53 

Library 16-17 

Masquers . 18 

Mathematics, Course Descriptions 70-73 

Mathematics. Senior College Preparatory 45 

Medical Technologv, Senior College Preparatory 45 

Music (See Glee Club) .18-19 

Music, Course Descriptions 73-74 

Non-Resident Fee 26 

Nursing 47 

Pharmacy 48 

91 



INDEX (Continued) 

Philosophy, Course Descriptions 74 

Physical Education Program 33 

Physical Education, Course Descriptions 75 

Physical Education, Senior College Preparatory 46 

Physical Science, Course Descriptions 75-76 

Physics, Course Descriptions 76-78 

Physics, Senior College Preparatory 46 

Placement Service 16 

Political Science, Course Descriptions 78 

Pre-Dental. Senior College Preparatory 46 

Pre-Medical. Senior College Preparatory 48 

Pre-Nursing, Senior College Preparatory -- 47 

Pre-Optometry, Senior College Preparatory . 47 

Pre-Pharmacy, Senior College Preparatory- 48 

Pre- Veterinary, Senior College Preparatory 48 

Psychology, Course Descriptions 78-80 

Publications 19 

Recommendations 38 

Refunds 28-29 

Regents, Board of 5 

Regulations — General 32-38 

Reports and Grades 35-36 

Russian. Course Descriptions 80 

Scholarships 29-31 

Secretarial, 2-Year Program 51-52 

Social Science, Course Descriptions 80 

Sociology, Course Descriptions —. 81 

Spanish, Course Descriptions 82 

Speech 67 

Stenographic, 1-Year Program 52 

Student Activities - 18 

Student Assistants - . 31 

Student Center 19 

Student Personnel Services 15-16 

Student Publications 19 

Teaching, Senior College Preparatory 48-49 

Technical Institute. Coiuse Descriptions: 

Chemical. 83-85 

General 82 

Industrial 88-89 

Technical Institute Programs . 54-56 

Transfer. Admission by 22-23 

Transportation, Technical Programs 51 

Withdrawal from College 35 

ZooloQ^-. Coiuses in 58-59 



92 



i 



1965-66 



IFTIM ARMSTRONG 
"'"^ STATE 

COLLEGE 



SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



1965-1966 



Summer Fall Winter Spi 

Bulletin of 

Armstrong State College 

Savannah. Georgia 

A Unit of the University System of Georgia 




Membership in 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



Volume XXX Number 5 



1 965 


CALENDAR 


1 965 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 1 


S M T W T F 

1 2 

4 5 6 7 8 9 

11 12 13 14 15 16 

18 19 20 21 22 23 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


s 

3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


M T W T F 

1 2 

5 6 7 8 9 

12 13 14 15 16 

19 20 21 22 23 

26 27 28 29 30 


S 

3 

10 

17 
24 
31 


3 

10 
17 
24 

31 


M T W T F S 

1 2 

4 5 6 7 8 9 

11 12 13 14 15 16 

18 19 20 21 22 23 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F 

2 3 4 5 6 7 

9 10 11 12 13 14 

16 17 18 19 20 21 

23 24 25 26 27 28 

30 31 


S 

1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


S 
1 
8 

15 

22 
29 


M T W T F 

2 3 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 

16 17 18 19 20 

23 24 25 26 27 

30 31 


S 

7 

14 

21 

28 


S 

7 
14 
21 
28 


M T \V T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 
8 9 10 11 12 13 

15 16 17 18 19 20 

22 23 24 25 26 27 

29 30 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 

12 3 4 

6 7 8 9 10 11 

13 14 15 16 17 18 

20 21 22 23 24 25 

27 28 29 30 


S 
5 
12 
19 
26 


S 

5 
12 
19 
26 


M T W T F 

1 2 3 

6 7 8 9 10 

13 14 15 16 17 

20 21 22 23 24 

27 28 29 30 


S 

4 

11 

18 

25 


S 

5 

12 
19 
26 


M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

6 7 8 9 10 11 

13 14 15 16 17 18 

20 21 22 23 24 25 

27 28 29 30 31 


1 966 


CALENDAR 


1966 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 1 


S M T W T F 

2 3 4 5 6 7 

9 10 11 12 13 14 

16 17 18 19 20 21 

23 24 25 26 27 28 

30 31 


s 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


S 

3 
10 
17 
24 


M T W T F 

1 

4 5 6 7 8 

11 12 13 14 15 

18 19 20 21 22 

25 26 27 28 29 


S 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


S 

3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


M T W T F S 

1 2 

4 5 6 7 8 9 

11 12 13 14 15 16 

18 19 20 21 22 23 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F 

12 3 4 

6 7 8 9 10 11 

13 14 15 16 17 18 

20 21 22 23 24 25 

27 28 

MARCH 


S 
5 

12 
19 
26 


S 

8 
15 

22 
29 


M T W T F 

2 3 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 

16 17 18 19 20 

23 24 25 26 27 

30 31 


S 

7 

14 

21 

28 


S 

7 
14 
21 
28 


M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

8 9 10 11 12 13 

15 16 17 18 19 20 

22 23 24 25 26 27 

29 30 31 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T F 
12 3 4 

6 7 8 9 10 11 
13 14 15 16 17 18 
20 21 22 23 24 25 
27 28 29 30 31 


S 

5 

12 

19 

26 


S 

5 

12 
19 

26 


M T W T F 

1 2 3 

6 7 8 9 10 

13 14 15 16 17 

20 21 22 23 24 

27 28 29 30 


S 

4 
11 
18 
25 


S 

4 
11 
18 
25 


M T AV T F S 
1 2 3 
5 6 7 8 9 10 
12 13 14 15 16 17 
19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 27 28 29 30 



CALENDAR FOR 1965 - 1966 



Summer Session, 1965 



May 1: 

June 10: 
June 11: 
June 14: 
June 16: 
July 5: 
July 26-30: 
August 9-10: 



Last day to file all papers of Application for Admission 
for preferred registration status 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for Fall Quarter 

Examinations 



Fall Quarter, 1965 



August 20: 
September 13, 14: 



September 15: 
September 16: 



September 17: 



September 20 
September 22 
September 24 
October 25: 
November 3: 



November 15-19: 
November 25-26: 
November 29: 
December 6-8: 



Last day to file all papers of Application for Admis- 
sion (including CEEB SAT scores) 

9:00 A.M. 

Jenkins Hall — Freshman Orientation (including 

transfer students 
Group advisement for all new students 
8:30-11:00 A.M. 

Registration for pre-advised sophomore students 
1:30-4:00 P.M. 

Registration for new students accepted by May 1 
L-Z 1:30-2:30 

A-K 2:30-4:00 
8:30-11:00 A.M. 

Registration for pre-advised new students 

accepted after May 1 

L- Z 8:30- 9:30 A.M. 
A-K 9:30- 11:00 A.M. 
1:30-4:00 P.M. and 6:00-8:00 P.M. 

Registration and advisement for all other students 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Mid-term reports due 

Convocation for installation of student officers 
12:30 P.M., Jenkins Hall Auditorium) 

Pre-advisement for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Holidays 

Ga. and U.S. history and government test 

Examinations 



Winter Quarter, 1966 



December 14: Last clay to file all papers of Application for Admis- 
sion (including CEEB SAT scores) 

January 3: Registration 

January 4: Classes begin 

January 6: Last day to register for credit 

January 10: Last day to change classes 

February 7: Mid-term reports due 

February 21-25: Pre-advisement for Spring Quarter 

March 7: Ga. and U.S. history and government test 

March 15-17: Examinations 



Spring Quarter, 1966 



March 1 : Last day to file all papers of Application for Admis- 
sion (including CEEB SAT scores) 

March 23: Registration 

March 24: Classes begin 

March 28: Last day to register for credit 

March 30: Last day to change classes 

April 8: Holiday 

April 25: Mid-term reports due 

May 9-13: Pre-advisement for Summer and Fall Quarters 

May 10: Ga. and U.S. history and government test 

May 18: Honors Day Assembly 

June 1, 2, 3: Examinations 

Beginning in 1966, Armstrong State College will offer a full Summer Quarter 
in which a student may take a maximum of 17 quarter hours. 



Summer Quarter, 1966 



May 


1: 


May 


31: 


June 


13: 


June 


14: 


June 


16: 


June 


20: 


July 


4: 


July 


18: 


August 1-5: 


August 23-25 



Last day to file all papers of Application for Admis- 
sion for New or Transfer Students 

Last day to file all papers of Application for Admis- 
sion for Transient (Summer only) Students 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Holiday 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for Fall Quarter 

Examinations 



Kr«i;eiits, University System of Geor«;ia 

244 Washington Street, S.W. -Fourth Floor 
ATLANTA 

State at Large — James A. Dunlap Gainesville 

(February 19, 1960 -January 1, 1967) 

State at Large — Jack Adair . Atlanta 

(January 13, 1965 -January 1, 1971) 

State at Large — Rov V. Harris Augusta 

(February 19, 1960 - January 1, 1967) 

State at Large — Dr. John A. Bell, Jr. Dublin 

(January 1, 1963 -January 1, 1970) 

State at Large — Carey Williams Greensboro 

(January 1, 1962 -January 1, 1969) 

First — Anton F. Solms, Jr. Savannah 

(January 1, 1962 - January 1, 1969) 

Second — John L Spooner Donalsonville 

(January 1, 1961 -January 1, 1968) 

Third — T. Hiram Stanley Columbus 

(January 13, 1965 -January 1, 1971) 

Fourth — H. G. Pattillo Decatur 

(February 5, 1965 -January 1, 1970) 

Fifth — Jesse Draper Atlanta 

(January 1, 1961 -January 1, 1968) 

Sixth — James C. Owen, Jr. Griffin 

(February 5, 1965 -January 1, 1971) 

Seventh — Ernest L. Wright Rome 

(February 6, 1959 - January 1, 1966) 

Eighth — John W. Langdale Valdosta 

(January 13, 1964 -January 1, 1971) 

Ninth — Morris M. Bryan, Jr. Jefferson 

(February 3, 1959 -January 1, 1966) 

Tenth — G. L. Dickens. Jr Milledgeville 

(February 5, 1965 - January 1, 1972) 



Officers and Staff of the Board of Regents 

Chairman ...James A. Dunlap 

V ice-Chairman .Morris Bryan, Jr. 

Acting Chancellor S. Walter Martin 

^Assistant to Chancellor. John E. Sims 

Director of Plant and Business Operations ....J. H. Dewberry 

Executive Secretary L. R. Siebert 

Treasurer James A. Blissit 

Director Testing & Guidance John R. Hills 

Coordinator of Junior Colleges Harry S. Downs 

*On leave. 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Armstrong State College Commission 

The Commission controls certain endowment funds and scholar- 
ship funds which have been contributed by local citizens over a period 
of years. It serves also in an advisory capacity to the college. 

Dr. Irving Victor ..Chairman 

Frank Barragan, Jr. Vice-Chair man 

JuLE C. Rossiter Secretary & Treasurer 

APPOINTIVE EX-OFFICIO 

Dr. Irving Victor, Chairman Mayor Malcolm Maclean 

Mr. Frank Barrogan, Jr.^ Judge Robert F. Lovett 

Vice-Chairman t^ ^ at c . • 

Dr. Ihord Marshall, Superin- 

Mr. Edw^ard J. Bartlett tendent of the Board of Educa- 



Mr. John Peters, Jr. 



tion, Chatham County 



Dr. Darnell Brawner, President 
Mr. Frank Hill of the Board of Education 

Mr. John F. M. Ranitz, Jr. Mr. Jack Altman, President of 

the Chamber of Commerce 



Officers of Administration 

Henry L. Ashmore President 

Joseph I. Killorin Dean of the College 

James T. Rogers Dean of Student Affairs 

Jack H. Padgett Registrar 

Mary H. Strong .Director, Community Services 

JuLE C. Rossiter Comptroller 

Dale Price Admissions Officer 



I 



ADMINISTRATION 



Heads of Deparlments 

Leslie B. Davenport, Jr. Biology 

Orange W. Hall Business Administration 

Fretwell G. Crider : Chemistry & Physics 

James Harry Persse Fine Arts 

Roy Carroll History & Political Science 

Hugh Pendexter, III Humanities 

F. Lane Hardy Mathematics 

Roy Jesse Sims Physical Education 

Dorothy M. Thompson Psychology & Sociology 

Regina Yoast Library 

Secretarial and Administrative Staff 

Marjorie a. Mosley.... Secretary to the President 

Elizabeth Howard Secretary to the Dean of the College 

Virginia M. Arey Assistant to the Registrar 

Minnie McG. Campbell Secretary to the Registrar 

Bertis Jones IBM Operator 

Sarah Floyd Tuten Secretary to the Faculty 

Helen Meighen... Secretary to Director, Community Services 

Corinne H. McGee.... Assistant to Comptroller 

Norma Jean Calloway Secretary to Comptroller 

Mary Elizabeth Pound Manager, Student Center 

& Book Store 

Ira J. Ryan Superintendent of Buildings & Grounds 

Eleanor Salter Secretary to Librarian 

Elizabeth B. LeGette Assistant to Catalog Librarian 

Miriam Shuman Secretary to Dean of Student Affairs 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



THE FACULTY 

^Josephine Amari, A.B., G.S.W.C.; M.A., Columbia University; Di- 
ploma, SorbonnCj Paris, France 

Instructor in French 

M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B., M.A., Baylor University 

Professor of English 

Ruth Arger, B.A., Oglethorpe University; M.A., University of 
Tennessee 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Henry L. Ashmore, B.A.E., M.A.E., D.Ed., University of Florida 

President 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., University 
of Georgia 

Professor of History 

*]. Fred Beverly, A.B., M.A., Mercer University 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Frank A. Brimelow, A.R.T.C.S., Royal College of Advanced Tech- 
nology, Salford, England; M. S., Vanderbilt University 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

ViRGiNL\ Carr, B.A., Florida State University; M.A., University of 
North Carolina 

Instructor in English 

Roy Carroll, B.A., Ouachita Baptist College; M.A., Ph.D., Vander- 
bilt University 

Head, Department of History and Political Science 
Professor of History 

**WiLLiAM E. Coyle, A.B., Emory University; M.A., Georgetown 

University 

Associate Professor of History & Political Science 

Fret\vell Crider, B.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
Head, Department of Chemistry and Physics 
Professor of Chemistry 

Leslie B, Davenport, Jr., B.S., College of Charleston; M.S., Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Head, Department of Biology 
Professor of Biology 



*Part-time Instructor. 
**Leave of Absence during academic year 1965-66. 



ADMINISIKAIION 



John Kenneth Davidson, B.S., M.A., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Josephine F. Davidson, B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 
M.A., Florida State University 

Catalogue Librarian 

Lamar W. Davis, B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina; Certified 
Public Accountant 

Professor of Business Administration 

John L. M. desIslets, Col. (Ret.), B.S., United States Military 
Academy 

Professor of Physics 

John Donald Duncan, B.S., College of Charleston; M.A., University 
of South Carolina 

Assistant Professor of History 

Orange W. Hall, B.S., Air Force Institute of Technology; M.B.A., 
Hofstra College; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Head, Department of Business Administration 
Professor of Business Administration 

Raymond Ralph Hall, B.A., Mississippi State College; M.S., Auburn 
University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

F. Lane Hardy, A.B., Oglethorpe University; M.A., Emory University; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Head, Department of Mathematics 
Professor of Mathematics 

*Reginald C. Haupt, Jr., L.L.B., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Business Administration 

^Philip Hoffman^ B.B.A., M.B.A., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Business Administration 

John J. Hutton, B.A., M.A., University of Notre Dame 
Assistant Professor of English 

♦Stanley Karsman, L.L.B., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Business Administration 



•Part-time Instructor. 



10 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

*Chauncey Kelley, B.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology; Musical 
Director and Conductor, Savannah Symphony Orchestra 
Instructor in Music 

Joseph L Killorin, A.B., St. Johns College; M.A., Columbia 
University 

Dean of the College 

Walter B. Laffer, B.S., Case Institute of Technology; Ph.D. Ohio 
State University 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

OsMOS Lanier, Jr., B.A., LaGrange College; M.A., Auburn Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Associate Professor of History 

*James Harris Lewis, B.S., University of Georgia; L.L.B., Univer- 
sity of Virginia 

Instructor in History and Political Science 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B.Mus., Converse College; B.A., Univer- 
sity of Georgia; M.A., Columbia University 

Professor of English and French 

John C. McCarthy, Jr., B.B.A., University of Miami; M.B.A., Uni- 
versity of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

*Francis L. Mannion, Jr., B.I.E., University of Florida 
Instructor in Mathematics 

^Hinckley A. Murphy, A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Columbia 
University 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Alvin W. Neely^ Jr., B.A., University of North Carolina 
Instructor in English 

John F. Newman, B.A., University of Mar)land; M.A., Georgetown 
University; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Associate Professor of Political Science and History 

*JoHN M. Parr, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Engineering 

Jack H. Padgett, A.B., Wofford College; M.A., University of North 
Carolina 

Registrar 



*Part-time Instructor. 



ADMINISTRATION 11 



Hugh Pendexter, III, A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., Northwestern 
University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Head, Department of Humanities 
Professor of English 

James Harry Persse, B.F.A., University of Georgia; M.M., Ph.D., 
Florida State University 

Head, Department of Fine Arts 
Professor of Music 

Harry L. Povve, Jr., B.S., Davidson College; B.S., Ph.D., North 
Carolina State 

Admissions Officer 

Dale Price, B.A., Florida State University; M.A., Florida State Uni- 
versity 

Associate Professor of Biology 

^Robert B. H. Rockwell, Col. (Ret.), B.S. in E.E., Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology 

Instructor in Physical Science 

James T. Rogers, B.S., Delta State College; M.R.E., N.O.B.T.S.; 
Ed.D., Florida State University 

Dean of Student Affairs 

JuLE C. RossiTER, A. A., Armstrong State College 

Comptroller 

Lea Leslie Seale, B.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana; 
M.A.; Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Professor of English and German 

James L. Semmes, B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.S., Florida 
State University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Roy Jesse Sims, B.S., David Lipscomb College; M.S., University of 
Tennessee 

Head, Physical Education Department 

Professor of Physical Education 

Baseball Coach 

Marcia Smith, B.S., University of Tennessee 

Instructor in Physical Education 



*Part-time Instructor. 



12 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

William M. Starrs, B.A., M.F.A., Catholic University of America 

Assistant Professor of English 

Director, "Masquers" 

Cedric Stratton, B.Sc, Nottingham University, England; Ph.D., 
Birkbeck College, London, England 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Mary H. Strong, A.B., University of West Virginia 
Director, Community Services 

Robert I. Strozier, A.B., University of Georgia; M.A., Ph.D., Florida 
State University 

Associate Professor of English 

Robert T. Stubbs, B.S., M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Professor of Mathematics 

Law^rence M. Tapp, B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
Basketball Coach 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B., Monmouth College; M.A., Northwest- 
ern University; Certificate in Psychiatric Social Work, Western 
Reserve University 

Head, Department of Psychology and Sociology 
Professor of Psychology and Sociology 

Francis M. Thorne, III, B.S., Stetson University; Ph.D., University 
of Georgia 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Jean Wingate Vining, B.S., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Shorthand, Comptometer and Typing 

William Sw^oll Winn, B.D., A.B., Emory University; M.A., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

Professor of Mathematics 

K. C. Wu, B.A., Grinnell College; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 
Professor of History and Political Science 

Regina Yoast, B.A., Texas Christian University; B.S. in Library 
Science, Columbia University 

Librarian 



I 



General Information 

Ariiistronjj; State College : 
Purpose and Programs 

A college is a community of teachers and students who organize 
their energies for the work of the mind. Success in college means that 
a student has acquired those liberating skills of the mind that enable 
a man or woman to live the most fruitful life possible for him or her; 
that he has discovered the usefuhiess of those skills for understanding 
the world and for living in it competently and conscientiously. 

Amistrong State College attempts to provide a climate where 
the student is induced to make connections between what he thinks 
and does and the best that has been thought and done. It is a climate 
intending to nourish the judging, critical and free man, responsible 
to himself and to his fellow man because he is developing and testing 
his own ideas and values. 

Here the student works under able teachers to acquire those 
liberal arts, and with their aid to explore man and his world through 
the insights of the humanities, the natural sciences and the social 
sciences. For these studies are the core of every degree program. 

A student chooses a program of study leading to the degree best 
suited to his interest and vocational goal. 

Programs leading to the following degrees are offered. 

FOUR YEAR DEGREES 

1. Bachelor of Arts in the fields of history and English. 

2. Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology and chemistry. 

3. Bachelor of Business Administration in the general field of 
business administration. 

For these degrees the full third year will be offered in 1966-67; 
the full fourth year in 1967-68. The third and fourth year courses of 
other major fields (such as political science, mathematics, medical 
technology and music) will probably be offered in the near future. 

TWO YEAR DEGREES 

4. Associate in Arts as preparation for higher degrees in the lib- 
eral arts and the professions. This degree is awarded to pre- 
professional programs leading to degrees in engineering; in- 
dustrial management; medicine, medical technology, dentistry, 
optometry, and pharmacy; education, law, theology, journal- 
ism, and social work. 

One year preparatory programs in forestry, nursing and pre- 
veterinar)' medicine are also offered. 

5. Associate in Arts: Terminal,, designed to meet the needs of 
those students who wish to qualify for positions in business 
(e.g. as secretaries or accountants) after two years of college. 

One year programs in stenography and business are also offered. 



14 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

History of the College 

Armstrong State College was founded on May 27, 1935, as Arm- 
strong Junior College, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Savannah to meet a long felt need for a college in the community. 
The College was housed in the Armstrong Building, a gift to the city 
from the family of George F. Armstrong, and over the years built 
or acquired five more buildings in the neighborhood of Forsyth Park 
and Monterey Square. 

The College, as Armstrong College of Savannah, became a two- 
year unit of the University System of Georgia on January- 1. 1959, 
under the control of the Regents of the University System. 

In 1962, the Mills Bee Lane Foundation purchased a new campus 
site of over 200 acres, selected by the Regents. The new campus, 
with seven new buildings, will be occupied during the academic year 
1965-66. 

In 1964, the Regents conferred upon Armstrong the status of a 
four-year college, with the right to offer the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Business Administration. 
The first degrees will be conferred in June, 1968. 

The College community now includes about 1200 students and 
45 faculty members (about 38% of whom possess the Ph. D. degree). 

Armstrong Evening Classes 

In addition to the full daytime schedule. Armstrong offers a 
schedule of classes in the evening, including most of the required 
courses for many programs leading towards a degree. 

Students employed during the day must limit their enrollment 
to one or two courses each quarter. 

Library 

The Library's collection numbers more than 17,000 volumes, 
with additional unbound pamphlets and government documents. The 
library receives 203 periodicals, 11 periodical and bibliographic in- 
dexes and 8 newspapers. The libraiy collection also includes approxi- 
mately 500 phonograph records and 75 tapes which are available for 
circulation. There are three professionally trained librarians on the 
staff to assist faculty and students, and, with additional qualified 
personnel, to process the rapidly growing collection. The College 
expects to increase its collection to about 45,000 carefully selected 
volumes by 1969-70. 

The libraiy building on the new campus has many advantages 
over the present library quarters in Hodgson Hall. There is a seating 



GENERAL LNFORMA'llON 15 

capacity for 580 and shelving space for 74,000 volumes. A seminar 
room, listening stations, individual study carrels, faculty study rooms, 
typing room, air conditioning and carpeted floors arc some of the 
features that make the new library functional and attractive. 

An Orientation course in the use of the library is given to all fresh- 
men. More detailed information of present library services may be 
obtained in the "Annstrong College Library Handbook", available 
on request to the Librarian of the college. 

Office of Community Services 

1. Short Courses, Workshops and Institutes. These are planned, 
organized and administered by the Office in response to group 
interest, or to meet a community need brought to the atten- 
tion of the Director. All are offered on a non-credit basis and, 
except in a very few cases, there are no special requirements 
or prerequisites for admission. A bulletin of such courses and 
special events, under the heading of "The Seven-Thirty Series" 
is mailed out before the beginning of every quarter; anyone 
wishing to do so may have his name placed on this mailing 
list. Subjects covered vary widely; the series is designed to 
offer something to appeal to almost any adult taste, from 
Computer Programming to a survey of the leading religions 
of the United States. The Director is always glad to arrange 
courses for candidates preparing to take professional examina- 
tions in engineering, insurance, real estate and many other 
fields; the college has been approved as an Examination Cen- 
ter for a number of these examinations. One-day workshops, 
such as the annual Writers' Workshop, are also planned and 
managed by this office. 

2. University of Georgia Extension Courses. These courses offer 
the opportunity to earn upper division credit from the Uni- 
versity of Georgia. Instructors for these classes are approved 
by department heads and deans of the various colleges at 
the University, and grades are recorded in the Registrar's 
Office at Athens. Fee for a five quarter hour course is $39. 
Applications and registrations for Extension Courses are 
handled by the Office of Community Services, entirely separate 
from Armstrong courses. The Director is also the University 
of Georgia representative for administering final examinations 
for correspondence courses taken from the University. 



16 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Student Affairs 



The Division of Student Affairs, administered by the Dean of 
Student Affairs, is responsible for the non-academic student services 
and activities. The College recognizes the importance of promoting 
the growth and development of the intellectual, social, spiritual, emo- 
tional, and physical aspects of the students. The Division of Student 
Affairs discharges these obligations through the following individuals: 
Admissions Officer, Registrar, Testing and Guidance Counselor, Co- 
ordinators of Student Activities, and Alumni Director. 

Admissions 



The Admissions Office of Armstrong State College has as its 
purpose the assistance in the transition of students from high school 
to college. This office, administered by the Admissions Officer, pro- 
vides information, evaluates records submitted, and notifies students 
of acceptance. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applications forms for admission to Armstrong State College are 
provided by the Director of Admissions upon request. 

An application cannot be considered until all required forms are 
properly executed and returned to the Admissions Office. Application 
forms for entrance in 1965-66 must be submitted on or before dates 
set forth below. 

Summer Session, 1965 — May 1 

Fall Quarter, 1965— August 20 

Winter Quarter, 1966 — December 14 

Spring Quarter, 1966 — March 1 

Summer Session, 1966 — May 1 (New or Transfer) 

— May 31 (Transient — Summer Only) 

For preferred registration status in Fall, 1966, applications must 
be submitted by May 1, 1966. 

With the application form must be submitted the following: 
application form fee, transcript, and College Entrance Examination 
Board scores. 

The College reserves the right to terminate acceptance of appli- 
cations when enrollment capacity is reached. The College further 
reserves the right to reject an applicant who is not a resident of the 
State of Georgia. 

An applicant will be declared eligible for admission only upon 
his compliance with the following requirements and conditions: 



I 



ADMISSION 17 



1. The applicant must be at least sixteen years old on or before 
registration date and must be of good moral character. Armstrong 
State College reserves the right to examine and appraise the character, 
personality, and physical fitness of the applicant. 

2. The applicant must meet one of the following conditions: 

(a) Graduation from an accredited high school. 

(b) Successful completion of the General Education Develop- 
ment Test with no score less than 45. 

3. A transcript of the applicant's high school records must be 
submitted by the high school directly to the college. 

4. The applicant must have a minimum of sixteen units as fol- 
lows : 

English — 4 

Mathematics (one must be algebra) — 2 

(Two years of algebra and one of geometry are needed 

for those entering the engineering or scientific fields.) 

Science — 2 

Social Studies — 2 

Other units sufficient to graduate. 

5. The Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board is required of all applicants. Official results of this 
test must be filed with the Admissions Office by the final date of sub- 
mitting application for the quarter for which the student wishes to 
enroll. 

6. The Achievement Tests of the College Board also are required 
for those who have not completed a college course in English and/ or 
mathematics. The tests required are EngHsh and Mathematics Level I. 

7. Application Form Fee — A validating fee of $10 must ac- 
company each complete application form before it can be given offi- 
cial consideration. This fee does not bind Armstrong State College to 
admit the applicant nor does it indicate acceptance of the applicant's 
qualifications. The fee will not be credited toward the mariculation 
fee in the event that the applicant is accepted as a student and it 
will not be refunded in the event that the applicant does not enroll 
as a student. An applicant who fails to enroll for the quarter for 
which he is accepted must reapply for admission if he wishes to enter 
the institution at a later time by re-submission of fee by the date 
specified. 

Further Policies 

1. When the application forms, College Entrance Examination 
Board scores, and other required records of the applicant are found 
to be complete and in order, the applicant will be evaluated on the 



18 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

basis of his grades, scholastic test scores, and potential ability. His 
predicted grade average based on these factors must indicate that the 
applicant has the potential to pursue effectively the educational pro- 
gram of the College. 

2. The College reserves the right to examine further any appli- 
cant by the use of psychological, achievement, and aptitude tests. 
Each applicant must give evidence of good moral character, promise 
of growth and development, seriousness of purpose, and a sense of 
social responsibility. 

3. The College further reserves the right to require additional 
biographical data and/or an interview before the applicant is accepted 
or rejected. If an interview is required, the applicant will be notified. 

4. The Director of Admissions may refer any applicant to the 
Admissions Committee of the College for study and advice. The ulti- 
mate decision as to whether an applicant shall be accepted or rejected 
shall be made by the Director of Admissions subject to the applicant's 
right of appeal as provided in the policies of the board of Regents 
of the University System. 

5. The Director of Admissions shall, as promptly as practicable, 
inform the applicant of the action taken upon his application. 

Transfer Students 

1. All regulations applicable to students entering college for 
the first time shall be applicable to students transferring from other 
colleges. These regulations are described in the foregoing section on 
Admissions. 

2. A student who applies to transfer to Armstrong State College 
from another college shall submit the following: 

(a) Application 

(b) Fee 

(c) Transcripts of all other colleges attended. 

(d) Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores 

(Beginning with the Summer Quarter of 1965, CEEB 
Achievement Test scores in English and mathematics will 
also be required for those who have not successfully com- 
pleted a college course in these subjects.) 
An application will not be considered for admission unless the 
transcript shows honorable discharge from the college last attended 
or unless the officials of the institution last attended recommend the 
applicant's admission. 

3. Regulations in regard to transfer of credit: 

(a) The amount of academic credit that the College will al- 
low for work done in another institution within a given 



ADMISSION 19 



period of time may not exceed the normal amount of 
credit that could have been earned at the College during 
that time. A maximum of sixty (60) academic quarter 
hours from an accredited college may be applied in the 
applicant's program at Armstrong. 

(b) Coinses transferred for credit from either colleges or 
universities must have an over-all grade of "C". Only 
grades of "C" or better are acceptable in Freshman Eng- 
lish. No credit is allowed for remedial English and mathe- 
matics. 

(c) A student on probation or academic suspension at another 
college will not be considered by Armstrong until two 
(2) quarters have elapsed since date of probation or 
suspension. 

(d) The total number of hours that may be earned toward 
an associate degree by extension courses shall not exceed 
twenty-two and one half (22/2) quarter hours. 

(e) A transient student is one who attends for the summer 
session only with permission from his previous college or 
university. A special application form is used by transient 
students. 



Readmission of Former Students 

1. Former students who have attended other colleges. 

(a) If a former Transient student, the applicant must present 
a new Transient Application or all grades from other 
schools attended since he last attended Armstrong. 

(b) A former regular student at Armstrong who has trans- 
ferred to another college must present a Transient Ap- 
plication or transcript of all colleges attended since 
leaving Armstrong. 

2. Former students who have not attended another college. 

(a) A former regular Armstrong student who has not been 
elsewhere may be readmitted by the Registrar's Office if 

(1) he is in good academic standing. 

(2) two quarters have elapsed since his first or second 
academic dismissal from Armstrong. 

(3) the student bears a letter approving readmission by 
Committee on Academic Standing. 

(b) No readmission is possible after a third academic dismissal. 



20 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Admission of Veterans 

After having been accepted at Armstrong State College and 
upon receipt of Certification of Eligibility and Entitlement from the 
Veterans Administration, veterans may attend under Public Law 
815 (disabled), Public Law 894 disabled), Public Law 634 (war 
orphans), or Public Law 361 (children of permanently disabled vet- 
erans). Students under Public Law 361 or 634 should be prepared to 
pay tuition and fees at time of registration. 

Applicants Sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation 

Those appHcants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or 
other community agencies must apply at least six (6) weeks before 
the beginning of any quarter to insure proper processing of appli- 
cation. 

Foreign Students 

A student from a county other than the United States who is 
interested in Armstrong must meet the following requirements before 
application is made: 

(a) He must have met the requirements of paragraph 4, un- 
der Admission Requirements, in regard to units in the 
subjects required at Armstrong. 
(b' His transcript should be sent to the Admissions Office 

at Armstrong with an official translation. 
(c 1 He should take the SAT of the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board in the testing center nearest his home and 
ask that the result be sent to Armstrong. 
If all the above requirements have been passed on favorably by 
Armstrong, the applicant will be sent a set of application papers. 
When these are received, the applicant will receive an 1-20 Form 
(I-20A and I-lOB), which he can then take to the American Consul 
to ask for a student \isa. 

Armstrong is a community college and has no dormitory- or board- 
ing facilities, so these must be arranged by any student who does not 
live in Savannah. 

No scholarships are available for students who are not residents 
of Georgia. All foreign students pay non-resident fees. 

Summer Probationary Quarter 

Annstrong State College is initiating a "Summer on Trial" pro- 
gram, beginning in the summer of 1965 for those who do not auto- 



ADMISSION 21 



matically meet regular admissions standards. The student attending 
this program must take two subjects. If he achieves a "C" average 
at the conchision of the Summer Session, he continues on in the fall 
as a regular student. 

All application documents and the application fee must be sub- 
mitted by May 1st for entrance into this program. The documents 
necessary are the application, transcript of grades, SAT and ACH 
scores. 

Residency Requirements of the 
Board of Regents 

1. A student who is under 21 years of age at the time he seeks 
to register or re-register at the beginning of any quarter will be ac- 
cepted as a resident student only upon a showing by him that his 
supporting parent or guardian has been legally domiciled in Georgia 
for a period of at least twelve months immediately preceding the date 
of registration or re-registration. 

2. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as 
the guardian of a non-resident minor, such minor will not be per- 
mitted to register as a resident until the expiration of one year from 
the date of the appointment, and then only upon proper showing 
that such appointment was not made to avoid the non-resident fee. 

3. If a student is over 21 years of age, he must show that resi- 
dence in Georgia was established at least one year prior to the regis- 
tration date. Any period of time during which a person is enrolled 
as a student in an educational institution in Georgia may not be 
counted as a part of the year's residence herein required when it 
appears that the student came into the State and remained in the 
state for the primary purpose of attending a school or college. 

Any inquiries about residency should be directed to the Admis- 
sions Office. 



Counseling & Guidance 

A qualified Testing and Guidance Counselor is located in the 
Office of Student Personnel. Over the years the College has de- 
veloped a comprehensive program of testing and counseling to meet 
the varying needs of students. This counseling program is designed 
to give assistance to students experiencing difficulties relating to per- 
sonal problems, vocational goals, or transition to college. Nationally 
standardized tests of many types are made available to all students 
and are often used to supplement the counseling process. Although 
many types of guidance are available to students, the most often 



22 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

requested service of this office relates to decisions affecting a student's 
choice of educational programs and vocations. 

Academic advisers from the faculty are also assigned to new and 
returning students to assist them in planning their academic course 
of study. 

The Student Personnel Office also provides information on 
available part-time job openings, scholarships, loans, assistantships, 
and financial aid of various kinds which is available to students. A 
student's use of any of these services is voluntary and confidential. 

Financial Aid 



Through an expanding program of financial aid, Armstrong 
State College is able to assist well-qualified students in attaining 
their goal of a higher education. The Student Personnel Office, 
through a combination of scholarships, short-term loans, and student 
employment, tries to make it possible for all students with limited 
resources to attend college. 

Financial aid is awarded on the basis of financial need, scholastic 
achievement, and character. Scholarships are awarded primarily to 
students of high ability who are in need. Students with satisfactorily 
academic records are eligible to be considered for available, part-time 
work on campus. Short-term loan funds to defray registration ex- 
penses are also available to students. 

Armstrong State College uses the College Scholarship Service 
which evaluates the Parents' Confidential Statement. Freshmen may 
secure this form from the local high school counselor or from the 
College Scholarship Service, P. O. Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey. 
Applications which do not include this financial data are incomplete 
and cannot be considered. Applications for scholarships must be filed 
before May 14 (except April 30 for Regents Scholarships). Final 
action cannot be taken until the applicants have been accepted for 
admission to the college; thus, early application is urged. 

Scholarships 

A number of scholarships are made available each year through 
the generosity of Savannah civic and business groups. These scholar- 
ships range in amount from $100 to $338 per year. Available scholar- 
ships for the 1965-66 school year are as follows: 
Alpha Tau Beta 

Armstrong State College Alumni Association 
Chatham County Teachers' Association 
Chatham Education Association Scholarship 
Edward McGuire Gordon Memorial Scholarship 



SCHOLARSHIPS 23 



Junior Chamber of Commerce 

Arthur Lucas Memorial Scholarships 

Pilot Club of Savannah 

Rebel Chapter, American Businesswomen's Club. 

Savannah Gas Company 

Harry G. Strachan, HI, Memorial Scholarship 

Regents' Scholarships 

Another source of scholarship aid for students who are residents 
of the State of Georgia is the Regents' Scholarship. These scholar- 
ships are awarded to superior students who are in need of financial 
assistance to attend college. To be eligible for a Regents' Scholarship 
a student must have grades or predicted grades that place him in the 
upper 25% of his class. Recipients of Regents' Scholarships are ex- 
pected, upon completion of their program of study, to reside in the 
State of Georgia for a period of one year for each $1,000 of scholarship 
aid received. 

Further information on these scholarships and application forms 
may be obtained from the Student Personnel Office at the College. 
The deadline for applying for the Regents' Scholarships is April 30. 

Other Sources of Financial Aid to 

Armstrong State College 

Solomon's Lodge No. 1, F. & A.M. Scholarships — Two scholar- 
ships for $240 each to be awarded to a graduate of a tax-supported 
high school. Apply to: Committee on Scholarship Awards, Solomon's 
Lodge No. 1, F. & A.M., P. O. Box 1711, Savannah, Georgia. 

Savannah Chapter, National Secretaries Association — One schol- 
arship covering tuition, fees and expenses, for a female student ma- 
joring in secretarial science. Apply to: High School Counselor or 
typing teacher. 

William F. Cooper Education Fund — Provides scholarships to 
female students in all fields except law, theology, and medicine 
(nursing and medical technology are acceptable). Apply to: Trust 
Department, Savannah Bank & Trust Company, between April 1 and 
May 31. 

State Teachers' Scholarships — Provide scholarship funds for stu- 
dents who will enter the field of teaching in the State of Georgia. 
Apply to: Georgia State Teachers' Scholarship Program, State De- 
partment of Education, Room 247, State Office Building, Atlanta 
3, Georgia. 



24 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Ty Cobb Education Foundation Scholarship — Provides scholar- 
ship aid for residents of the State of Georgia who have completed 
their freshman year in college. Apply to: Ty Cobb Educational 
Foundation Scholarships, Room 454, 244 Washington Street, S. W., 
Atlanta 3, Georgia. 

Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund — Provides loans at reason- 
able interest rates to students in need of such aid to attend college. 
Apply to: Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund, P.O. Box 1238, Co- 
lumbus, Ga. 

Savannah Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship — One scholar- 
ship for $200.00 for a freshman student majoring in pre-pharmacy to 
attend Armstrong College (or the University of Georgia). Apply to: 
Mr. Thomas C. Crumbley, Chairman, Scholarship Committee, Sa- 
vannah Pharmaceutical Association, c/o Crumbley's Pharmacy, 1502 
Waters Avenue, Savannah, Georgia. 

Chatham Artillery Scholarships — A number of scholarships for 
$250.00 each to members of the Chatham Artillery attending college 
full-time. Apply to the Chatham Artillery. 

State Department of Vocational Rehabilitation — Students who 
have had a physical or emotional handicap, and have been treated suc- 
cessfully, and are considered acceptable for vocational rehabilitation, 
may receive financial assistance to attend college through the State 
Department of Vocational Rehabilitation. Apply to: 35 Abercom 
Street, Savannah, Georgia. 

Student Assistantships 

A limited amount of financial aid is available to students through 
the Economic Opportunity Act and the College Student Assistantship 
Program. Through these programs a number of part-time, on campus, 
jobs are made available to students. Interested individuals should con- 
tact the Student Personnel Office prior to the beginning of each 
quarter. 

The Student Personnel Office also maintains a file of available 
part-time jobs in the community and is glad to assist students, when- 
ever practicable, in locating outside work. 

Registrar 

The Registrar's Office provides factual information on students 
regarding their records, academic standing, and progress toward de- 
gree requirements. 



CLUBS 25 



Aliiiiini Office 

I'hc prime purpose of the Alumni Office is to keep former stu- 
dents informed about the college, and to help them keep in touch 
with each other. Any person who at any time was matriculated as 
a regular student is eligible for membership in the Alumni Society, 
and upon payment of his dues will receive the quarterly newsletter, 
"The Geechce Gazette," and may vote and hold office in the society. 
The Alumni Office assists in arranging class reunions, board meetings, 
and other functions. 



Student Activities 



In addition to the academic side of college life, Armstrong State 
College offers a complete program of extra-curricular student activities 
designed to contribute to the development of the student and assist 
him in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. 
This program is administered by the college through the office of the 
Dean of Student Affairs. 



Student Government 

The Student Senate is the governing body for student activities 
at Armstrong State College. It is comprised of elected representatives 
of all campus organizations recognized by the Senate. It is the func- 
tion of the Student Senate to co-ordinate, direct, and control student 
activities and organizations at Armstrong. It is presently undergoing 
a number of changes which will enable it to better serve the student 
body. 

Clubs & Organizations 

College organizations include a dramatic club, a Glee Club, 
five religious clubs, a Debate Forum, and other groups promoting 
interest in certain phases of the academic program or specific career 
fields. 

The Masquers offer membership to all students and faculty 
members interested in any phase of the theatre: acting, designing, 
lighting, make-up, costuming, and other production skills. The 
Masquers possess a well equipped theater, and are under the direction 
of a professional dramatics director. They produce a number of plays 
for the community annually. 

The Armstrong Glee Club is composed of students who enjoy 
singing and desire the satisfaction to be gained from group singing. 



26 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Besides two yearly concerts at the college, the Glee Club has produced 
musicals with the Armstrong Masquers and sung for many civic groups 
in Savannah. 

Student Publications 

There are two student publications at Armstrong State College, 
The Inkwell, a newspaper, and the 'Geechee,' the college annual. 
These afford the students an opportunity to express themselves through 
creative writing, layout and art work, and to gain experience in these 
and other journalistic activities. 

Athletic Activities 

Armstrong College participates in intercollegiate sports compe- 
tition in basketball, golf and baseball. Other sports at the college, 
such as volleyball, bowling, tennis, golf, softball, etc., are offered on 
an intramural basis with competition between volunteer intramural 
teams or between other interested campus organizations. All are en- 
couraged to take part in the program. 

Student Center 

The Student Center is housed in the Hunt Building and is open 
throughout the day. During school hours short orders and light 
lunches may be purchased at reasonable prices. The Center also pro- 
vides recreational facilities and houses the Book Store. 



I 



k 



FEES 



Application Fee 

The Application Fee of $10.00 is made by all students at the 
time of initial application for admission to Armstrong State College. 
The acceptance of the Application Fee does not constitute acceptance 
of student. This fee is not refundable. 

Matiiculation Fee 

The Matriculation Fee for students registering for the normal 
course load of fifteen hours is $60.00. Special students (those carrying 
less than 12 credit hours in a quarter) will pay at the rate of $5.00 
per quarter hour in Matriculation Fee. 

Out of State Tuition 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $100.00 per quarter 
in addition to all regular fees. Special students (those carrying less 
than 12 credit hours in a quarter) who are not legal residents of the 
State of Georgia will pay at the rate of $8.00 per quarter hour Out- 
of-State Fee in addition to all regular fees. 

Student Activity Fee 

There will be a Student Activity Fee of $10.00 per quarter for 
students registering for a course load of ten or more quarter hours. 
Special students carrying less than ten credit hours in a quarter will 
pay at the rate of $1.00 per quarter hour. This fee is not refundable, 
and is effective at the beginning of the Fall Quarter, 1965. 

Late Registration Fee 

In the Summer Session a late registration fee of $4.00 will be 
charged to students registering on the first day of class and a fee of 
$5.00 will be charged for registrations completed on the last day to 
register for credit. 

In the Fallj Winter and Spring Quarters a late registration fee 
of $3.00 will be charged to students registering on the date listed in 
the catalog as the date on which classes begin. A fee of $4.00 will be 
charged for registrations completed on the day following the date on 
which classes begin. A fee of $5.00 will be charged for registrations 
completed on the date listed in the catalog as the "last day to register 
for credit." 



28 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Change of Schedule Fee 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the changing of a student's schedule 
after the registration cards have been processed. No charge is made 
if the change is initiated by the College. This fee is not refundable. 

Graduation Fee 

A Graduation Fee of $7.50 will be collected from each candidate 
for graduation. 

Transcript Fee 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college 
work. The charge for additional copies is $L00 each. 

Music Fees 

Students enrolled in Applied Music Courses will be required to 
pay a special fee. The fees are indicated in the description of courses 
found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Make-up Test Fee 

For cause, a student may arrange with an instructor to make 
up an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to 
make up the announced test must be made within one week after the 
student returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the making up of any announced 
quiz and a fee of $5.00 for a make-up final examination and labora- 
tory examinations, except as shown below. The total charges to any 
one student for a final make-up examination in a given subject shall 
not exceed $5.00. All fees will be paid to the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final 
examinations will not be charged are as follows: The student was 
absent (1) on official college business; (2) due to illness; (3) because 
of death in the family; or (4) in observing religious holidays. 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from paying the 
fee must be presented in writing to the instructor. 

Short Courses 

Fees are announced for each course when the course is an- 
nounced. No refund can be made for withdrawal from a course. 



1-EKS 29 



Summary of Fees 



Matriculation, per quarter $ 60.00 

Student Activity, per quarter 10.00 

TOTAL FOR CxEORGIA RESIDENTS $ 70.00 

Out of State Tuition, per quarter 100.00 

TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS $170.00 

Matriculation, Special Students, per quarter hour 5.00 

Student Activity Fee, Special Students, per quarter hour 1.00 

Non-Resident Tuition, Special Students, per quarter 

hour (in addition to Matriculation Fee) 8.00 

Privilege Fees 

Application Fee .. $ 5.00 

Late Registration — Maximum 5.00 

Special Examinations 2.00 

Final Examinations 5.00 

Graduation 7.50 

Transcript, first one free, each additional 1.00 

Change of Schedule 2.00 



Refunds 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon written application for 
withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to students dropping 
a course. Students who formally withdraw during one week following 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 80% of 
the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw dur- 
ing the period between one and two weeks after the scheduled regis- 
tration date are entitled to a refund of 60% of the fees paid for that 
quarter. Students who formally withdraw between two and three 
weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund 
of 40% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally 
withdraw during the period between three and four weeks after the 
scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 20% of the 
fees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after a period of 
four weeks has elapsed from the scheduled registration date will be 
entitled to no refund of any part of the fees paid for that quarter. 

Students who formally withdraw from the Summer Session are 
entitled to refunds as follows: 

Withdrawal on 1st, 2nd or 

3rd day of first week 80% refund of fees paid 



30 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Withdrawal on 4th or 5th 

day of first week 60% refund of fees paid 

Withdrawal on 1st, 2nd or 

3rd day of second week 40% refund of fees paid 

Withdrawal on 4th or 5th 

day of second week 20% refund of fees paid 

Fees and Charges are Subject to Change at the End of any Quarter 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 
not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquency has been removed. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full at the time of regis- 
tration. 

If a check is not paid on presentation to the bank on which it is 
drawn, the student's registration will be cancelled and the student may 
re-register only on payment of a $5.00 service charge. 



Regulations 

Faculty Advisers 

The Academic Dean's Office assigns a faculty adviser to every 
student enrolled in day or evening classes. Before registering for 
classes each quarter a student must consult his adviser and receive 
his written approval for the courses in which the student plans to 
enroll. 



Pre-Advisement 

At announced times during each quarter a student may be pre- 
advised for his courses for the following quarter. The dates for pre- 
advisement with his faculty adviser are given in the calendar of this 
Bulletin. Instructions will be published quarterly. 

Advanced Placement 

Armstrong State College gives advanced placement, or in some 
cases college credit, for college level high school courses, on the basis 
of the high school teacher's recommendation, the student's grade on 
the Advanced Placement Examination, and approval by the depart- 
ment chairman of Armstrong State College. 

Armstrong State College/High School 
Accelerated Program 

This program marks a new venture for this community in which 
college and high school join to challenge intellectually able young 
men and women to test their interests and their capacity to learn. 

The Program 

High school students who have completed the eleventh grade, 
who have met the criteria for admission to this program and who 
maintain its standards will be permitted to enroll in one course each 
quarter at Armstrong State College while they complete the senior 
year of high school. Upon graduation from high school, these students 
will be admitted upon appHcation as regular students of the College 
and will be given full college credit for the courses taken at Armstrong. 

Through this program, a student may complete over two-thirds 
of the freshman year of college before he begins his regular college 
career. 



32 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The maximum number of college 


courses possible is: 




Summer 




1 course ( 5 qtr. 


hours) 


Fall 




1 course ( 5 qtr. 


hours) 


Winter 




1 course ( 5 qtr. 


hours) 


Spring 




1 course ( 5 qtr. 


hours) 


Summer 


(following high 






school 


graduation and 







admission to Armstrong) 3 courses (15 qtr. hours) 

7 courses (35 qtr. hours) 

The College Courses 

Every student accepted in this program must take English 101: 
Composition as his first course. Thereafter he may choose any fresh- 
man course, with permission of his college adviser. 

Criteria of Admission 

The College will consider a student for this program only upon 
recommendation of his high school principal. In the view of the 
College, it is only the principal who can judge the circumstances that 
may make the program valuable and practicable for any student. 

To be admitted to the program a student must satisfy all of these 
criteria : 

L recommendation by the Principal of the high school; 

2. completion of the eleventh grade in an accredited high school; 

3. a combined verbal and math score of 1000 on SEEB tests; 

4. an average grade of B or better in academic subjects 
(English, mathematics, science, social studies, languages) 
through the ninth, tenth and eleventh grades as averaged by 
the College Admissions Office; 

5. written permission of the parents. 

Standards 

A student forfeits the privilege of this program if in any quarter 
his grade in the college course is below C or his high school average 
in academic courses is below B. 

Procedure for Admission 

A high school principal may recommend students following the 
fifth six-week period of the students' ele\enth year. The recommenda- 
tion to the College must be made by May 15th if the student intends 
to begin in the summer. The principal may recommend following 
the full eleventh year by August 15th if the student intends to begin 
in the fall. 



REGULATIONS 33 



Placement Tests 

To help a student select a definite objective early in his college 
program, the Armstrong staff administers to each entering freshman 
a series of interest and achievement tests. Achievement tests in English 
and mathematics are administered prior to admission. Placement in 
English and mathematics courses is determined on the basis of the 
student's high school record and the scores on these tests. Interest 
tests are administered durins: Freshman Week. On the basis of these 
objective measurements, the student's previous record, and his interest, 
the student with the aid of his adviser decides on a program of study 
which will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 

Placement in "English 100" 

On the basis of entrance test scores and high school record, cer- 
tain students will be required to take "English 100" in their first quar- 
ter. This course must be completed with a grade of at least "C" 
before these students may register for any other English course. "Eng- 
lish 100" may be repeated once, but only in the following quarter. 

Physical Education Program 

All day students who are carrying as many as 10 quarter hours 
and (or) are candidates for diplomas or certificates are required to 
attain credit for six physical education courses, one each quarter. A 
student graduating in less than six quarters may reduce the physical 
education requirements accordingly. Regular courses should be taken 
in proper sequence and two required courses should not be scheduled 
in any one quarter. 

Students planning a one-year program may choose any three 
of the required physical education courses. 

A student who has served a minimum of three months in the mili- 
tary services shall be exempt from Physical Education 111. A student 
who has served a minimum of six months in the military services shall 
be exempt from Physical Education 111 and 112. Proof of service 
time shall be presented to the Physical Education Department. 

In order for a day student to be excused from any one physical 
education course, he must have his or her doctor sign a special form. 
A student who does not plan to graduate from Armstrong State Col- 
lege will be allowed to register for any quarter without physical edu- 
cation providing he or she signs the form provided by the Physical 
Education Department. No student may register without a required 
physical education course except with written permission from the 
Physical Education Department. 



34 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

The physical education department requires all students to make 
up all excused absences. Any unexcused absence from class will result 
in a lower final grade. 

Physical education is not required of students in the evening 
program, nor of students beyond the age of 25. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 16-17 quarter hours per 
quarter. A schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that the aver- 
age student will devote approximately forty-eight hours per week to his 
college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Except in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 17 quar- 
ter hours will be granted only to students who have a "B" average for 
the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to graduation, a student 
may take an extra course which is necessary to meet requirements for 
graduation. No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 
hours in any one quarter. 

No student who is employed full-time will be allowed to take 
more than 1 1 quarter hours of work in the fall, winter or spring quar- 
ter unless he has better than a "B" average in the last quarter for 
which grades are available. No student may enroll for more than ten 
quarter hours of credit in the Summer Session. This regulation 
does not apply to transient students who are regularly enrolled in 
another institution. 

Auditing 

A student wishing to "audit" a course without receiving credit 
must obtain the written permission of the instructor before he registers 
for the course. (Policy for some courses forbids "auditing") An 
"auditor" cannot change to regular credit status after the first week 
of class. A student who registers for a course as an "auditor" receives 
no credit, "N. C.", on his transcript. Regular schedules of fees apply 
to auditors. 

Admission to Class 

A student will be admitted to class when the instructor is furn- 
ished an official class card indicating that the student has completed 
his registration and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 



Compliance with the regulations of the faculty and the Regents of 
University System of Georgia is assumed. Gambling, hazing, and the 
use on the campus of intoxicating beverages are prohibited. 



i 



REGULATIONS 35 



Attendance 

At Armstrong a student's responsibility towards a course includes 
all that transpires in class sessions as well as the subject matter of the 
course. Any absence whatsoever from class work entails a loss to the 
student. 

An absence may be excused by the instructor if the student is 
absent 

( 1 ) on official college business, 

(2) due to illness (with a doctor's certification), 

(3) because of death in the immediate family, 

(4) in observing religious holidays. 

A student who has been absent from class for such a valid reason 
should present a written statement to his instructor. 

Excuses must be submitted within seven days from the date the 
student returns to school; otherwise the absence will not be excused. 

Absences for other serious reasons, equal in number to the times 
the class meets in one week, ivill be allowed without written excuse 
before a student is dropped from class. 

The instructor will notify the Registrar's Office when a student 
should be dropped. The Registrar's Office will notify the student. 
A student who is dropped within three weeks after the beginning 
of the quarter will automatically receive a grade of VV. A student 
who is dropped after the third week of the quarter will receive either 
a W or a W/F depending upon his status at the time he withdraws 
or is dropped from class. 

A student will be penalized for unexcused absences from the 
first day the class meets (even though registration is not yet com- 
pleted), unless one of the four valid excuses applies. 

Any student whose absences for any cause exceed one third of the 
number of times the class meets in the quarter will be dropped from 
the class. The student will be given W or W/F depending upon his 
academic status at the time he is dropped. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the Registrar in writing, is a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediately 
make such an intention known to the Registrar in writing. This 
notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. A refund will be 
considered only from date of notice. 

A student should formally withdraw from any class by securing 
the permission of the Student Personnel Officer and of his instructor. 



36 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

This written approval should be filed in the Registrar's office. A stu- 
dent who withdraws within three weeks after the beginning of the 
quarter will automatically receive a grade of W. A student who with- 
draws after the 3rd week of the quarter will receive a W or W/F 
depending upon his status at the time the student withdraws or is 
dropped from class. 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt by the faculty that students in college should be held 
accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, grade reports, warnings 
of deficient scholarship and all such notices are not sent to parents 
or guardians by the Registrar except on request. Instead the students 
themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact their 
advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report cards are issued 
at the end of each quarter. Reports of grades are issued in the middle 
of each quarter. Each student has access to an adviser; in addition, 
the Registrar and all instructors are available to help any student 
seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

Numerical Span Honor Points 

A+ 95-100 4.5 

A 90- 94 4 

B+ 85-89 3.5 

B 80- 84 3 

C-f 75- 79 2.5 

C 70- 74 2 

D-f 65- 69 1.5 

D 60- 64 1 

F Below 60 

I Incomplete 

W Withdrew with no grade 

WF Withdrew failing 

NC No credit 

A Student who receives an "I" (incomplete grade) should consult 
his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of the 
course. An "I" grade which has not been removed by the middle of the 
succeeding quarter automatically becomes an 'T". 

Honors 

Dean's List: Students enrolled for at least ten hours of course 
work who earn an honor point average of 3.0 or above will be placed 
on the Dean's List which is published quarterly. 

Permanent Dean's List: At the completion of forty-five hours of| 
course work, students with an honor point average of at least 3.0 



REGULAIIONS 37 



will be placed on the Permanent Dean's List which is published 
yearly in June. Sophomores complctinpj forty-five hours (to make a 
total of ninety) and earning an honor point average of 3.0 will be 
placed on the Pcimanent Dean's List. 

Students eligible under the above categories and earning an honor 
point average of 3.96 or above will be placed on the Permanent Dean's 
List and designated With Distinction. 

Honors at Graduation 

Summa Cum Laude: Students who are graduating with an honor 
point average of 3.96 or above will be designated as graduating summa 
cum laude. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point aver- 
age of from 3.0 to 3.96 will be graduated cum, laude. 

Valedictorian: The valedictorian will be selected by the gradu- 
ating class from the five students with the highest academic average 
in the work completed up to the quarter just prior to graduation. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 

A student failing to maintain the following grade point averages 
on all work attempted at Armstrong College will be placed on aca- 
demic probation for two quarters. 

Quarter Hours Grade Point Average 

45 L6 

90 L8 

135 L9 

180 2.0 

Academic probation requires that a student maintain a grade 
point average of at least 2.0 for each of two successive quarters. 
Failure to meet the requirements of such probation will result in the 
dismissal of the student for two quarters. 

A full-time student (one who enrolls for 12 or more quarter 
hours) who fails to pass at least one course other than physical educa- 
tion in any quarter will be dismissed from the college for two quarters. 
A part-time student (one who enrolls for less than 12 quarter hours) 
who fails to pass at least one course other than physical education in 
two successive quarters will be dismissed from the college for two 
quarters. A grade of "E" (incomplete) will be considered an 'T" 
until it is removed. 

A student re-entering the college after academic dismissal will 
be placed on academic probation for two successive quarters. 



38 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

The Summer Session will be considered a normal quarter for the 
above regulations. 

A student dismissed for academic reasons may appeal his dismissal 
to the Committee on Academic Standing. Such appeals must be made 
in writing to the Committee (addressed to the Secretary), should 
state the nature of all extenuating circumstances relating to his aca- 
demic deficiency, and must be received by the Committee by the time 
of its announced meeting. 

A third dismissal for failure to meet the academic standards of 
the college shall in all cases be final. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong State College 
are listed below: 

L The student will complete a program of study listed elsewhere 
in the catalog under "Programs of Study" with a grade point 
average of 2.0 on work taken at Armstrong. Any exceptions to 
a program may be referred by a student's adviser to the Aca- 
demic Dean. 

2. The final 45 quarter hours of the work required for graduation 
shall be completed at Armstrong State College. 

3. By state law one of the requirements for a diploma or certifi- 
cate from schools supported by the State of Georgia is a dem- 
onstration of proficiency in United States history and govern- 
ment and in Georgia history and government. A student at 
Armstrong may demonstrate such proficiency by passing 

1) PoHtical Science 113 and History 351 or History 352, 
or 2) A two hour examination in United States and Georgia 
history and government. 

4. When exceptions to prerequisites for courses are made, per- 
mission may be granted only by the head of the department 
concerned. A recommendation regarding any request for ex- 
ception to prerequisites for courses must be made to the depart- 
ment head by the course instructor. This need not be binding 
upon the department head. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Registrar's 
Office one quarter prior to the expected date of graduation. 



Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the grades 
the student earns and his student records. 



REGULA'l'IONS 39 



The files of the Registrar's office which inchide all pennanent 
records are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, the Civil Service, the local Credit Bureau and other 
agencies having access to confidential records. A good college record is 
of vital importance to a student. 



Programs of Study 



Beginning in June, 1968, the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, and Bachelor of Business Administration will be conferred 
upon students completing all requirements for those degrees. 

The Degree of Associate in Arts will be conferred upon students 
completing all requirements of a two year program. 

Before registration every student must plan a program of study 
with a faculty adviser appointed by the Academic Dean. Even if a stu- 
dent knows what courses are required in his program, he must have on 
record in the office of his adviser a copy of his program. Before a stu- 
dent may change his planned program he must consult his adviser. 

If a student plans to transfer to another college before graduation, 
he should acquire the catalog of that college in order to determine 
what courses must be completed at Armstrong to meet the degree re- 
quirements of the college to which he may transfer. 

A student planning to receive either the Bachelor's degree or the 
Associate in Arts degree is responsible for securing approval for his 
program from his adviser and the Registrar two quarters prior to the 
expected date of graduation. 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are generally planned for the fresh- 
man level; courses numbered 200 to 299 for the sophomore level; 
courses numbered 300 to 399 for the junior level; courses numbered 
400-499 for the senior level. 

Four Year Programs Leading to the 
Bachelor's Degree 

For the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science or the Bachelor 
of Business Administration degree, a minimum of 185 quarter hours, 
exclusive of physical education, will be required for graduation. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree: Total Requirements 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, the minimum 
requirements in the various fields of study will be: 

I. Humanities 

A. Freshman English 10 

B. Literature of the Western World 20 

C. Foreign Language 10-20 

D. Fine Arts 5 

45-55 



r 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 41 

n. Social Studies 

A. History of Civilization 10 

History of the United States 10 

B. Political Science: American Government 5 

C. Three courses from at least two of the following 
fields : 

Anthropology 

Economics 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 15 

40 

HL Natural Sciences 

A. Mathematics (algebra) . 5 

Logic or Mathematics 5 

B. Laboratory Science 10 

20 

IV. Major Field 30-40 

V. Closely related fields (300 and 400 courses). . . .. 25-35 

VI. Electives . ., 10-30 

VII. Physical Education 6 

Bachelor of Science Degree: Total Requirements 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Science, the mini- 
mum requirements in the various fields of study will be: 

I. Humanities 

A. Freshman English 10 

B. Literature of the Western World 10 

C. Foreign Language 10-15 



30-35 



42 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

IL Social Science 

A. History of Civilization 10 
History of the United States 5 

B. Political Science: American Government 5 

C. Two courses from two of the following fields: 

Anthropology 

Economics 

Philosophy 

Psychology 

Sociology 10 

30 
HL Natural Sciences 

A. Mathematics (algebra and trigonometry) 10 

B. Laboratory Science 20 

30 

IV. Major 30-40 

V. Closely related fields 25-35 

VL Electives 5-20 

Vn. Physical Education 6 

Bachelor of Business Administration Degree: 
Total Requirements 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Business Admin- 
istration the minimum requirements in the various fields of study will 
be: 

I. Humanities 

A. Freshman English 10 

B. Literature of the Western World 10 

20 
H. Social Sciences 

A. History of Civilization 10 

History of the United States 5 

B. Political Science: American Government 5 

20 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 43 



in. Natural Sciences 




A. Mathematics (algebra) 


5 


Logic or Finite Mathematics 


5 


B. Laboratory Science 


10 



20 

Electives from the Humanities, the Social Sciences, or 
Natural Sciences 15 

IV. Freshman and Sophomore Business Administration 
requirements : 

Business Correspondence 5 

Principles of Accounting 10 

Principles of Management 5 

Principles of Economics 10 

Economic History of the United States 5 

35 

V. Junior core requirements: 

Business Law - 5 

Corporation Finance 5 

Marketing 5 

Statistics — 5 

Money and Banking _.. 5 

Government and Business -- 5 

Labor Economics 5 

35 

VI. Major Concentration 30 

1. Accounting 

Intermediate Accounting 
Cost Accounting 
Tax Accounting 
Auditing 

Accounting Systems 
Business Law 

2. Business Education 



44 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

3. Economics 

Intermediate Economic Theory 

Advanced Economic Theory 

Investments 

Business Cycles 

Comparative Economic Systems 

Monetary Theory 

International Trade 

Contemporary Economic Problems 

VII. Free Electives 10 



I 



SENIOR C:()LLK(;K I'RKPARA lOIO PROGRAMS 



45 



Two Year Programs Leading to the 
Associate in Arts Degree 

The following courses are required in all programs leading to the 
degree of Associate in Arts : 

English 101, 102; 201, 202 (in certain terminal programs Eng- 
lish 228 may be substituted for English 102, 201, or 202) ; 

History 114, 115; 

Natural sciences (ten quarter hours from biology, chemistry, 
physics, and physical science) ; 

Physical Education HI, 112, 113, and any three courses num- 
bered in the 200's. (For exceptions to requirements for physical 
education, see Regulations, p. 35.) 

Knowledge of United States history and government and of Geor- 
gia history and government must be demonstrated in order to receive a 
degree or certificate. 



Business Administration 

First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Physical Education HI, 112, 113.. 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Mathematics 101 5 

Mathematics 103 5 

Business Administration 115 5 

TOTAL 48 



(1) 

Second Year 

English 201, 202 . 10 

Physical Education 3 

Business Administration 101, 102.. 10 

Economics 101, 102 10 

Political Science 113 5 

Business Administration 260 5 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 48 



Chemistry (30) 
First Year 

Chemistry 121, 122 10 

Chemistry 281 5 

Mathematics 101, 102 10 

Mathematics 104 5 

English 101, 102 10 

Political Science 113 5 

Physical Education 111,112,113.. 3 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

Chemistry 281, 340, 341 7 

Mathematics 201, 202 ^ 10 

History 114, 115 10 

English 201, 202 10 

Physics 204, 205, 206 15 

(or 207, 208, 209 18) 

Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 55 



46 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Engineering (2) 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for most types of 
engineering. The courses required for the freshman year have been 
planned in consultation with the Georgia Institute of Technology. 

First Year Second Year 



English 101, 102 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113.. 3 

Chemistry 121, 122 10 

Mathematics 101, 102, 104 15 

Chemistry 281 5 

Engineering 113, 114, 115 6 



English 201, 202 10 

Physical Education 3 

Mathematics 201, 202, 203 15 

Physics 207, 208, 209 18 

History 114, 115 10 

Political Science 113 5 



TOTAL 



49 



TOTAL 



61 



English 101, 102 . 10 

History 114 5 

Physical Education 1 1 1, 112, 1 13.. 3 

Chemistry 121, 122 10 

Chemistry 281 5 

Engineering 113, 114, 115 6 

Mathematics 101, 102, 104 15 



TOTAL 



54 



English 201, 202 10 

Physical Education 3 

History 115 5 

Business Administration 101, 102.. 10 

Economics 101, 102 . 10 

Mathematics 103 5 

Physics 204, 205, 206 15 

TOTAL 58 



Liberal Arts (6) 

This program is recommended for candidates for the A.B. degree, 
pre-education, pre-law, pre-ministerial, journalism, social work, and 
other pre-professional concentrations. 

First Year Second Year 



English 101, 102 . .. 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 . 3 

*Science 10 

Mathematics 101 5 

Mathematics 102 5 

•Foreign Language 10 



TOTAL 



53 



English 201, 202 10 

Physical Education 3 

Science with laboratory 10 

Two of the following courses — 

Histor>' 225 

Political Science 113 

Psychology' 201 

Sociology 201 

Economics 101 

Philosophy 110 10 

Electives 10 



TOTAL 



43 



*A student applying for admission to a senior college which does not require 
the amount indicated of this subject may, with the approval of his adviser, 
substitute other courses required by the senior institution during the first two 
years. 



Industrial Management (5) 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first two 
years of this field of engineering. . 

First Year Second Year 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 47 



Malheiiiatirs (7) 



A piogiam designed for those students who wish to major in 
niatheniaties. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

Chemistry or Biology 10 

Mathematics 101 5 

Mathematics 102 5 

Mathematics 104 5 



TOTAL 



48 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 10 

Mathematics 201, 202, 203 15 

Mathematics 235 5 

Physical Education 3 

Physics 207, 208, 209 10 

Electives 5 



TOTAL 



48 



ftledical Technology (8) 

This program is designed for those students who desire a Bachelor 
of Science degree in Medical Technology. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

Zoology 124, 226 10 

Mathematics 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 121, 122, 281 15 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 10 

Zoology 356 6 

History 114, 115 10 

French or German 101-102 10 

***Electives 10 

Physical Education 3 



TOTAL 



49 



Physical Education (9) 
First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113.. 3 

Zoology 124, 225 10 

Home Economics 232 — Nutrition .. 5 

Mathematics 9 or 101 5 

*Electives 5 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 10 

Physical Education 3 

Zoology 108, 109 10 

♦♦Physical Education 203 2 

Physical Education 114 2 

Psychology 201 5 

Psychology 202 5 

Sociology 202 5 

Electives 6 

TOTAL 48 



*It is recommended that English 228 be taken as an elective course. 
♦♦The student is exempt from this course if he has a Red Cross "Senior Life 

Saving Certificate." 
'♦♦It is recommended that Zoology 225 be taken as an elective course. 



48 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Physics (10) 



A program designed for those students who wish to major in 
Physics. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 . 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113.. 3 

Chemistry 121, 122, 281 ... 15 

Mathematics 101 5 

Mathematics 102 5 

Mathematics 104 5 

Engineering 113, 114, 115 6 

TOTAL 49 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 10 

Physical Education 3 

Mathematics 201, 202, 203 15 

Physics 207, 208, 209 18 

History 114, 115 10 

Political Science 113 5 

TOTAL 61 



Pre-prof essional : Dentistry (11) 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Dentistry after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

10 

10 

15 

3 



Zoology 124, 226 

Mathematics 101, 102 

Chemistry 121, 122, 281 

Physical Education 111, 112, 



113 



TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Zoology 230 . — - 6 

French or German 101, 102 10 

*Electives 10 

Physical Education 3 



TOTAL 49 



Pre-prof essional : Medicine ( 12 ) 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of medicine after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

Zoology 124, 226 10 

Chemistry 121, 122, 281 15 

Mathematics 101, 102 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113.. 3 



TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 10 

Zoology 356 6 

French or German 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

*Electives 10 

Physical Education 3 



TOTAL 49 



*It is recommended that Zoology 225 be taken as an elective course. 



SENIOR CiOLI.KCK PRl'J'AKA K )m' PIUXiRAMS 



49 



Pre-]>rofessioiial: Oj>lonirtry (14) 

The requirements for admission to the schools and colleges of 
optomctiy in the United States are relatively uniform but are not iden- 
tical. The practice of optometry in all states is regulated by Boards of 
Examiners in Optometry, The following concentration will prepare a 
student for transfer to any school or college of optometry in the United 
States and Canada. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Zoology 124, 226 10 

Chemistry 121, 122 10 

Mathematics 101 5 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113.. 3 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 10 

Zoology 356 6 

Mathematics 102, 104 10 

Sociology 201 5 

Psychology 201 5 

Electives 10 

Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 49 



Pre-prof essional : Pharmacy (15) 

This is a two-year concentration for those students who wish to 
obtain their freshman requirements for entrance to a school of phar- 
macy. The regional schools of pharmacy require three years minimum 
in residence at the School of Pharmacy. 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Pharmacy after completing two years of 
academic studies. All students of Pharmacy are required to complete 
a five-year program, two of which are in Pre-Pharmacy and three in 
an accredited School of Pharmacy. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114,115 10 

Mathematics 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 121, 122, 281 15 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113. 3 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 10 

Economics 101 5 

Political Science 113 5 

Physics 204 5 

Zoology 124, 225, 226 15 

Electives 5 

Physical Education 3 

TOTAL "Is 



50 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Teaching (17) 

The subjects required in the freshman and sophomore years by 
colleges preparing teachers are: English, history, mathematics, sciences, 
social studies and physical education. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Biological or Physical Science 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 . 3 

Political Science 113 5 

Art 101 or Music 200 5 

*Electives 5 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

Education 201 5 

English 201, 202 10 

Mathematics 9 or 101 5 

Physical Education 3 

Psychology 201 5 

♦Electives 20 



TOTAL 



48 



Music 



(50) 

First Year 



English 101, 102 10 

Foreign Language 10 

Music Theory 110, 111, 112 9 

Sight Singing 101, 102, 103 3 

Applied Music 115a, b, c 6 

Mathematics 101 5 

Political Science 113 5 

Physical Education 3 



TOTAL 51 



Second Year 

English 201, 202 10 

Natural Science 10 

Music Theory' 210, 211, 212 9 

Sight Singing 201, 202, 203 3 

Applied Music 215a, b, c 6 

History 114, 115 10 

Physical Education 3 



TOTAL 51 



In addition to the above all music majors are required to participate in 
ensemble groups. 

The following preparatory programs of less than two years are 
also offered. 

Forestry (3) 

A one-year program for students in Forestry. 

English 101, 102 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

Botany 121, 122 10 

Economics 101 5 

Engineering 101 2 

Mathematics 101, 102 10 

Physics 204 or Physical Science 101 5 

Political Science 113 5 

TOTAL 50 



I 



♦Recommended electives for elementary teachers include Health, Geography, 
Economics, Georgia Problems (Social Science 104), English 228 and addi- 
tional science courses. 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 51 

Pre-prof essional : Nursing (13) 

This is a one year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a school of nursing 
offering the B.S. degree. The program as outHned is intended to satisfy 
the requirements of the Medical College of Georgia School of Nursing. 
Students planning to transfer credits are urged to consult the pre-nurs- 
ing advisor in order to be sure that they are taking the proper courses. 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Zoology 108, 109 10 

Chemistry 121 5 

Sociology 201 5 

Psychology 201 5 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

TOTAL 48 



Pre-veterinary Medicine (16) 

This is a four quarter program designed for those students who 
wish to transfer their credits to the University of Georgia School of 
Veterinar\- Medicine, which is the regional school. A student planning 
to spend four quarters at Armstrong should consult Veterinary School 
officials about his program. 

English 101, 102, 201 15 

Botany 121, 122 10 

Zoology 225, 226 10 

Chemistry 121, 122 10 

Mathematics 101, 102 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 _ 3 

TOTAL 58 



Terminal Programs 

Business Administration: Accounting (18) 

First Year Second Year 

Business Administration 101, 102 10 Business Administration 201T, 

English 101, 102 10 202T 10 

History 114, 115 10 English 201, 202, 

Natural Science . 10 228 (any two) 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 . 3 Economics 101, 102 10 

Elective 5 Business Administration 260 5 

Business Administration 115 5 

TOTAL 48 Physical Education 3 

Electives 5 



TOTAL 48 



52 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



A student who desires further training in this field may enroll for 
additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will be 
awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

Business Administration 236T, 237T — Income Tax Accounting 10 

Business Administration 229T — Cost Accounting 5 

Business Administration 207T, 208T 10 

Electives chosen from Business Administration, Economics or 

Industrial Technology courses 20 

TOTAL 45 



Business Administration 
First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Business Administration 101, 102 . 10 

Natural Science 10 

Business Administration 260 5 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

TOTAL 48 



General (20) 

Second Year 

Economics 101, 102 10 

English 201, 202 or English 

201, 228 . 10 

Business Administration 115 5 

Electives 20 

Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 48 



Commerce: Secretarial (24) 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students 
who wish to qualify for secretarial positions in business. If, because 
of prior training, a student is permitted by the instructor to omit the 
beginning theory courses in shorthand or typing, the student must 
choose elective subjects to supplement the total college hours required. 



First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114, 115 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 . 3 

Natural Science 10 

Commerce 101, 102, 103 6 

Commerce 111, 112, 113 9 



TOTAL 48 



Second Year 



Business Administration 101 5 

Business Administration 115 5 

English 201, 202 or 

English 201, 228 10 

Commerce 213 5 

Commerce 201, 202, 203 6 

Commerce 211 3 

Physical Education 3 

Electives 10 



TOTAL 47 



Liberal Arts (28) 

A student in the Terminal Liberal Arts program may select the 
remainer of his electives from any courses offered by the college in 
order to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 



TERMINAL PR0C;RAMS 53 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 English 201, 202 10 

History 114, 115 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113.. 3 ♦Elcctives 35 

Natural Science 10 

Mathematics 9 or 101 5 TOTAL 48 

♦Elcctives 10 



TOTAL 48 

The following terminal program of one year is also offered. 

Commerce: Stenographic (25) 

A student who has only one year to spend in college may acquire 
some of the clerical skills which will enable her to secure employment 
as a stenographer or clerk. Whether a student will be placed in begin- 
ning theory classes of shorthand or typing will depend upon how much 
previous training she has had in those subjects; a more advanced stand- 
ing must be approved by the instructor. A certificate is awarded upon 
completion of the following program. 

Commerce 101, 102, 103 6 

Commerce 111, 112, 113 9 

Commerce 213 5 

Business Administration 101 5 

English 101, 102 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

Business Administration 115 5 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 48 



*A student must elect 20 hours from at least three of the following subjects: 
Foreign Language, Political Science, Economics, Fine Arts, Philosophy, Psy- 
chology, Sociology, Mathematics (other than Mathematics 103). 



Course Descriptions 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to ( 1 ) withdraw any 
course for which less than ten students register, (2) limit the enroll- 
ment in any course or class section, (3) fix the time of meeting of 
all classes and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as de- 
mand and faculty warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in languages where 
the same or similar courses have been presented for admission from 
high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed, 
for example: Zoology 103-104. 

After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture; the second, 
the number of hours of laboratory; and the third, the number of quar- 
ter hours of credit the course carries. For example: Botany 121 — Gen- 
eral Botany (3-4-5). 

Art 

Art 101 — Creative Art (3-4-5). 

Drawing, painting and design principles, with some pertinent 
background history. Introductory practice in techniques, and applica- 
tion to every day life needs. 

Art 113— Ceramics (5-0-5). 

A beginner's course in the fundamentals of pottery and clay mod- 
eling. Various ways of forming clay, decorating, glazing and firing 
suitable subjects. 

Art 114 — Ceramics (5-0-5). 

A continuation of the beginner's course with emphasis on design, 
using the potter's wheel and understanding the use of glazes. Work 
may be developed in pottery or clay sculpture. 

Art 290 — Introduction to the History of Art (5-0-5). 

The formal characteristics of the painting, sculpture, architecture 
and some of the minor arts will be analyzed in their stylistic and sym- 
bolic developments which will be discussed in relation to the changing 
cultural background. 

Art 291 — Introduction to the History of Modern Art (5-0-5). 

A survey of world art during the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twen- 
tieth centuries. The formal characteristics of the painting, sculpture, 
architecture and some of the minor arts will be analyzed in their styl- 
istic and symbolic developments which will be discussed in relation to 
the changing cultural backgrounds. 



I 



COURSE DESCIRIPIIONS 55 

Biology 

Biology 210 — Microbiology (3-4-5). Prerequisites: ton hours of 
biological science with laboratory and five hours of inorganic chem- 
istry. 

An introduction to the study of micro-organisms with primary 
emphasis on bacteria. The morphology, life history, and public health 
importance of representative bacteria, molds, viruses, protozoa, and 
helminths are considered. 

Botany 121— General Botany (3-4-5). 

A study of the structure of the roots, stems, and leaves, basic 
physiolog)' and ecology of plants. Laboratory work on representative 
species. 

Botany 122 — General Botany (3-4-5). Prerequisite: Botany 121. 

A study of reproduction, heredity, and evolution of seed plants, 
with studies of representative species of the other major plant groups. 
Laboratory work includes field trips. 

Botany 305 — Identification of Flowering Plants (0-10-5). Pre- 
requisite: Botany 121, or equivalent elementary course in biological 
science. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis upon wild 
flowers. 

Zoology 103-104 — Human Biology (8-6-10). Not open to students 
who have credit for Zoo. 124. 

A basic course intended to acquaint the student with biological 
principles and their application to the human organism. The second 
quarter is a continuation of the first; no credit is allowed toward 
graduation until the sequence is completed. 

Zoology 108-109 — Human Anatomy and Physiology (6-8-10). 
Not open to pre-professional students in the biological sciences. 

A basic course considering the gross anatomy, histology, and 
physiology of the organ systems. Laboratory work includes thorough 
dissection of a typical mammal as well as basic experiments in physi- 
ology. The second quarter is a continuation of the first; no credit 
is allowed toward graduation until the sequence is completed. Not 
open to pre-professional students in the biological sciences. 



56 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Zoology 124 — General Zoology (3-4-5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 
101 is strongly recommended. Not open to students having credit for 
Zoology 103-104. 

A survey of principles in biology, with accent upon cellular phe- 
nomena. 

Zoology 225 — Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5). Prerequisite Zoology 
124, or Zoology 103-104, or Botany 121-122. 

A surv^ey of the invertebrate animals, their biology, structure, and 
relation to other animals. 

Zoology 226 — Vertebrate Zoology (3-4-5). Prerequisite: Zoolog)- 
124 or 103-104, or Botany 121-122. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and na- 
tural history of the vertebrate animals. 

Zoology 356 — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-6-6). Prereq- 
uisite: Zoology 226. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of 
the vertebrates. 



Business Administration 

Business Administration 101 — Principles of Accounting, Introduc- 
tory (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, and Spring. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures 
of accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, working 
papers, accounting statements, controlling accounts, special journals, 
partnerships and corporations. 

Business Administration 102 — Principles of Accounting, Introduc- 
tory (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 101. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as departmental operations, manufacturing accounts, the analysis of 
financial statements, accounting aids to management, statement of 
application of funds. 

Business Administration 115 — Business Correspondence (5-0-5). 
Winter and Spring. 

Covers various aspects of business and technical report writing. 
Attention is given to vocabulary building, a review of the mechanics 
of grammar, and techniques of business writing. Letter studies in- 
clude: sales, credit collection, promotion, application, routine, per- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 57 

sonal, and formal. Tn formation relative to effective policies in these 
areas is considered. 

Business Administration 301 — Principles of Accounting, Inter- 
mediate (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 102. 

Basic accounting theory and the solution of problems requiring 
an application of accounting theory. 

Business Administration 302 — Intermediate Accounting (5-0-5). 
Second Com-se. Prerequisite: Business Administration 301. 

A continuation of B.A. 301 emphasizing the theories of valuation 
of fixed assets and liability accounts, the application of these theories 
of valuation of fixed assets and liability accounts, the application of 
these theories and the interpretation of financial statements prepared 
on the basis of these theories. 

Business Administration 307 — Business Law (5-0-5). Fall. 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the following 
subjects. Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, 
rights of third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agency, 
liabilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements 
of negotiability, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties, dis- 
charge. 

Business Administration 308 — Business Law (5-0-5). Spring. 

The law governing the basic legal principles applicable to the 
following subjects which are of particular interest to those planning 
to major in accounting. Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities 
of curity holders, types of securities. Corporation: formation, powers, 
rights of security holders. Sales: vesting of title, warrants, remedies. 

Business Administration 329 — Cost Accounting (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 101, 102. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing 
including the job order and the process methods. 

Business Administration 330 — Cost Accounting (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Business xA.dministration 329. 

Standard cost procedures; budgeting; distribution costs and spe- 
cial cost problems. 

Business Administration 340 — Principles of Marketing (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 102. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and 
services from producers to consumers; marketing functions; marketing 



58 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

manufactured goods, raw materials and agricultural products; pro- 
posals for improving the marketing structure. 

Business Administration 350 — Retailing (5-0-5). 

Basically a course in merchandising and promotion. Retailing 
also covers allied services such as stock and inventory control, account- 
ing systems, mark-ups and materials handling. A review is given on 
the basic elements of salesmanship and modern trends. Store design, 
the effects of lightning, color dynamics, traffic and aisle display are 
illustrated. Delineation of the various advertising media is also in- 
volved. 

Business Administration 360 — Principles of Afanagement (5-0-5). 

Designed to prepare students in the fundamentals of all phases 
of administrative staff and operative management. Successful man- 
agement principles and techniques are given for all fields of business 
which include: business objectives, policies, functions, executive lead- 
ership, organization structure and morale, cooperative procedure and 
control procedure. 

Business Administration 365 — Principles of Insurance (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 102. 

A comprehensive treatment of the insurance field: an explanation 
of the different types of insurance and fundamental underlying prin- 
ciples, the organization of the insurance business and accepted insur- 
ance practices. 

Business Administration 370 — Real Estate Principles (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Economics 102. 

A consideration of the general principles of property utilization, 
the law dealing with ownership, transfer of title and liens: the ap- 
praisal process, determinants of values, the real estate cycle, manage- 
ment and salesmanship and regulatory legislation. 

Business Administration 375 — Personnel Administration (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 360. 

A study of the principles and practices in the field of the adminis- 
tration of human relations and industry. Emphasis is given to scien- 
tific techniques and devices in the development of a well rounded 
personnel program. | 

Business Administration 436 — Income Tax Accounting. Fall 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 102. 



A study of federal income tax laws, and the income tax returns 
of individuals, partnerships and corporations. 



I 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 59 

Business Administration 437 — Tax Accounting (5-0-5). Prereq- 
uisite: Business Administration 436. 

A continuation of Business Administration 436 with emphasis 
on corporations and fiduciary returns and social security taxes, gift 
taxes and estate taxes. 

Business Administration 450 — Auditing (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 102. 

A study of the principles of audits and financial verifications, 
standards of field work, and ethics. 

Business Administration 451 — Auditing Problems (5-0-5). 

The application of auditing theories and principles; preparation 
of audit working papers; writing audit reports. 



Chemistry 

Chemistry 121 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Fall and Winter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 9, or consent of instructor. 

A study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry 
through the modern concept of the atom, with a quantitative ap- 
proach to the laws. The lab consists of one three hour period per 
week emphasizing fundamental techniques as applied to the begin- 
ning experiments. 

Chemistry 122 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 121. 

This is a continuation of Chemistry 121 with emphasis on descrip- 
tive chemistry of particular elements, families and groups, including 
some organic chemistry. The lab follows with a study of the proper- 
ties and preparations. One three hour lab per week. 

Chemistry 281 — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). Spring 
and Fall. Prerequisite: Chemistry 122. 

The lecture to be devoted to the study of theoretical principles of 
chemical equilibrium and application to qualitative analysis. Lab is 
a systematic study of the separation and identification of common 
cations and anions by semi-micro techniques. 

Chemistry 282 — Quantitative hiorganic Analysis (2-9-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 281 or approval of the instructor. 

A study of the fundamental theories and applications of quanti- 
tative analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods. 



60 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Chemistry 341, 342, 3^3— General Organic (4-3-5). Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Chemistry 281. 

This sequence will provide a foundation in the fundamental 
principles and an introduction to the modern concepts of organic 
chemistry. The courses will emphasize the reactions of aliphatic and 
aromatic hydrocarbons as well as a study of heterocyclic compounds 
and naturally occurring carbohydrates. The laboratory consists of one 
three hour period per week. 

Chemistry 105 — Chemistry For Nurses (4-3-5). Fall. Principles of 
inorganic, organic, and physiological chemistry with special applica- 
tion to nursing practice. 



Chinese 

Chinese \0\-\02— Elementary Chinese (10-0-10). 
A basic training in Chinese conversation and reading. 

Chinese 201 — Intermediate Chinese (5-0-5). 

Coinmerce 

Commerce 101 — Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall, \Vinter and 
Spring. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper tech- 
nique and mastery of the keyboard. 

Commerce 102 — Beginning Typing Continued (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. 

This course is a continuation of speed development. In addition, 
instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulations is given. 

Commerce 103 — Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 101-102 or equivalent. 

A typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed build- 
ing and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, 
minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce 111 — Beginning Shorthand (5-0-3) Fall. Complete 
theory' of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Reading dictation and transcrip- 
tion from studied material. A dictation speed of 80 words a minute is 
attained. 

Commerce 112 — Beginning Shorthand (Continued) (5-0-3) Win- 
ter. A continuation of beginning shorthand from foundation learned in 
fall quarter. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 61 

Commerce 113 — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-3). Spring. 
Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of 100 words a minute. 

Commerce 201 — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 103 or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and ac- 
curacy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and 
business papers. Most of the student's work is done on a production 
timing basis. 

Commerce 202 — A continuation of Commerce 201 (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. 

Commerce 203 — A continuation of Commerce 202 (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. An average of 60 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 211 — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-3). Fall. Prerequi- 
sites: Commerce 111, 112, 113 or equivalent. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are ap- 
plied in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in 
transcribing. Dictating and typing of mailable letters are emphasized. 
A speed of 110 words a minute for five minutes is attained. 

Commerce 213 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 112 or equivalent or permission of instructor. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible, including the instruction of various business machines. Practical 
problems deal with typing, filing and office courtesy. 

Economics 

Economics 101 — Principles and Problems of Economics (5-0-5). 
Fall, Winter, Spring. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of 
the present time and an examination of some of the economic prob- 
lems in the modern world. 

Economics 102 — Principles and Problems of Economics (5-0-5). 
Winter and Spring. 

A continuation of the study of economic principles and problems 
begun in Economics 101. 

Economics \26— American Economic History (5-0-5). 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present with major 
emphasis on the period since 1860. It will deal with agriculture, in- 



62 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

dustry, labor, domestic and foreign commerce, transportation, money 
and banking, and finance. 

Economics 325 — Elementary Economic Statistics (5-0-5). Prereq- 
uisite: Economics 102. 

An introduction to presentation and analysis of quantitative 
economic data. Statistical sources, table reading, chart reading, chart 
making; elementary statistical procedures and their economic inter- 
pretation; introduction to index and time series analysis. 

Economics 327 — Money and Banking (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 102. 

The role of money in the economic organization; monetary 
theory; methods of stabilizing the price level; the integration of finan- 
cial institutions; theory of bank deposits and elasticity of bank cur- 
rency; discount policy and the interest rate of central banks; methods 
of regulating credit and business activities. 

Economics 329 — Labor Economics (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 102. 

An analysis of the background and origin of our modern labor 
organizations and their remarkable growth in recent years. 

Special emphasis is placed on the social and economic aspects 
of our labor problems including the study of w^ages, working condi- 
tions, unemployment problems, the movement toward shorter hours, 
workers welfare plans, labor organizations and the outlook for future 
developments along these lines. 

Economics 330 — Corporation Finance (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 102. 

Financial promotion and organization of business firms; problems 
of financial administration; failures; financial rehabilitation. 

Economics 431 — Investments (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Economics 
327, 330. 

A study of stocks and bonds, market operations, investments, 
mathematics, investment policies, and financial statements. 



Education 

Education 201 — Orientation to Teaching (5-0-5). Winter. 

For the beginning or prospective teacher, this subject offers a 
broad understanding of the American spirit in education, the place of 
the school in society, its growth and changing function as a social in- 
stitution. The problem and discussion approach is used. 



COURSE DESCRIPIIONS 63 

Education 206 -Educational Psychology (5-0-5). See Psychology 
206, page 80. 



t.ngineering 

Engineering Graphics 113 — (0-6-2). 

Topics of study include lettering (capital and lower case) ; the 
use of the instruments; geometric construction; orthographic projec- 
tion; emphasis on descriptive geometry concepts as applied to the 
solution of problems involving orthographic projection of solids, 
auxiliary views, and points, lines and planes. 

Engineering Graphics 114 — (0-6-2). Prerequisite 113. 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points, 
lines and planes by use of the revolution method; intersection of sur- 
faces; warped surfaces: the development of surfaces. Practical appli- 
cations are emphasized. 

Engineering Graphics 115 — (0-6-2). Prerequisite, 114. 

Topics of study include sections and conventions; dimensioning; 
pictorial representation; detail sketches; shop processes; assembly 
drawings from detail sketches; working pictorial sketches; introduc- 
tion to charts and graphs; reproduction processes, ink tracing on cloth; 
graphical calculus. 



English 

Students will be assigned to freshman English according to re- 
sults of tests taken before the beginning of the term. 

English 100 — Freshman English (4-2-5) . Fall, Winter and Spring. 

This is a course in expository writing. An effort is made to gain 
a thorough knowledge of sentence structure. Through practice, the 
student tries to achieve logical, coherent, and correct expression. A 
handbook of composition is used, and models of good writing are 
studied. 

Students who are placed in English 100 will also be required to 
spend two hours a week in the reading laboratory. Successful com- 
pletion of this work will be necessary in order to receive credit for 
English 100. 

Students who are assigned to this course must make a grade of 
C before taking English 101. 



64 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

English 101 — Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall, Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Assignment to this course is based on entrance test re- 
sults or the successful completion of English 100. English 101 must be 
completed with a grade of "C" in order to enter English 102. 

This is a course in writing in which the aim is the achievement 
of a standard acceptable in any professional field. Through practice 
and the study of models, the student works toward clarity, unity, 
coherence, correctness, and worthwhile subject matter. A library paper 
is written durinsr the term. 

o 

English 102 — Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall, Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite: English 101. 

Literature studied in this course comes from the two principal 
early sources of our culture: early Greek literature and the Bible. 
The works read are the Iliads the Odyssey, Greek drama. Genesis, the 
Saul-David story in Samuel and Kings, and the Prophets. 

English 201 — Sophomore English (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite: English 101, English 102. 

The study of literature continues with Shakespeare, poetry, novels, 
and short stories through the nineteenth century. 

English 202 — Sophomore English (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite: English 101, English 102, English 201. 

Modem literature, including novels, poetr\', and drama, is studied. 

English 227— Modern Drama (5-0-5). Fall. 

Class reading and discussion of modem plays from Ibsen's 
"Ghosts" to Miller's "Death of a Salesman." The course is centered 
on appreciaion of drama and improving of oral interpretation through 
reading selected plays aloud. 

English 228 — Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5). \Vinter. 

Basic principles and practices of speech. The course gives some 
attention to the physiological make-up of the speech mechanism, 
phonetics, gesture, articulation, pronunciation, and regional speech 
differences. However, it consists primarily of practicing the funda- 
mentals of speech through a wide variety of formal, informal, ex- 
temporaneous, impromptu, and group participation speech exercises. 

English 230— Principles of Theatre Art (5-0-5). Spring. 

A study and discussion of the fundamentals involved in the de- 
velopment of dramatic art and in the staging methods which have 
been and are now utilized in producing drama. The course will 



1 



COURSE DESCRIPI'IONS 65 

develop chronologically and will relate directly to historical events 
and to the changing form and method of writing for the stage. 

English 231— The Nineteenth Century (5-0-5). Spring. 

A survey of the most important verse and prose written in 
England and the United States during this period. 

English 375— The Novel (5-0-5). 

A study of selected English, European and American novels. 

English 410 — History of the English Language (5-0-5). 

English 402— Chaucer (5-0-5). 



French 

French 101-102— Elementary French (10-0-10). Fall and Winter. 

A course for beginners. The approach is primarily oral, and daily 
practice with tape recordings is required. Students who own tape ma- 
chines may have tapes recorded for home practice. 

No credit for graduation or transfer will be given until the 
sequence is completed. No credit will be given for these courses if 
two years of high school French have been presented for entrance 
credit. 

French 10 — Elementary French (3-0-3). Fall. 

French 11 — Elementary French (3-0-3). Winter. 

French 12 — Elementary French (4-0-4). Spring. 

These are the same courses as French 101-102 above, but more 
time is allowed for covering the work. Students will be enrolled for 
these sections on advice of the instructor. 

French 103 — Intermediate French (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 

Two quarters of college French or two years of high school French. 
Review grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 104 — Intermediate French, continued (5-0-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high 
school French. 



Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 201 — French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Spring. 
French 104. 

Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere and Racine. 



66 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Geography 

Geography 111 — World Human Geography (5-0-5). 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic activi- 
ties and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 

German 

German 101-102— Beginning German (10-0-10). Fall and Winter. 

Drill upon pronunciation and elements of grammar, conversation 
and the training of the ear as well as the eye. German is used as much 
as practicable in the classroom instruction. The course includes read- 
ing of texts and translations, conversation, dictation, and dialogues. 

No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is completed. 

No credit will be given for these courses if two years of high school 
German have been completed. 

German 201 — Intermediate German (5-0-5), Spring. Prerequi- 
site: Two quarters of college German or two years of high school 
German. 

Grammar review and comparative grammar are studied for the 
purpose of enabling students to write compositions. Short stories are 
read; and conversation is practiced. 

Health 

Health 111 — Personal and Community Health Problems (5-0-5). 

This course considers the meaning of health and factors influenc- 
ing health behavior; health problems as related to the individual; 
overview of world, national, state and local health problems; com- 
munity health organizations; mobilizing and evaluating community 
health resources. The legal aspects in community health and the 
laws governing reportable diseases is given special attention. 

History 

History 100 — Survey of American History (5-0-5). 

This course is designed to satisfy the state law requiring that all 
students receiving degrees shall pass an examination on the history of 
the United States and of Georgia. 



COURSE DESCRIPIIONS 67 

History 114 — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civili- 
zation (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

This course comprises a chronological sui-vey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and intellectual activity in Western Civili- 
zation from the time of the ancient Mediterranean civilizations to the 
present era. Selected topics and periods are studied in greater detail 
by a careful reading of works by Plato, Dante, Machiavelli, Descartes 
and others. Classes will meet three hours a week for lectures by the 
history staff and two hours a week in small groups for discussion. 

History 115 — A Continuation of History 114 (5-0-5). Spring and 
Summer. 

(For History 114 and 115 classes will meet three hours a week 
for lectures by the histor)' staff and two hours a week in small groups 
for discussion.) 

History 224— History of England (5-0-5). Winter. 

A study of English political and social institutions from early 
times to the present with special emphasis given to developments since 
the Tudor period. 

History 225 — Recent European History (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed 
study of major national and international developments in European 
affairs from about 1870 to the present time. Special emphasis is 
devoted to the First World War and new developments in Europe 
following that war and the complex of world events which preceded 
the Second World War. 

History 226 — Recent American History (5-0-5). Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, in Ameri- 
can life from about 1865 to the present time. 

History 320 — The civilization of China and the Far East, Part 
I (5-0-5). 

The history of East Asian civilizations from ancient times through 
the 18th century, with attention to characteristic political, economic, 
and social developments. 

History 321 — The civilization of China and the Far East, Part 2 
(5-0-5). 

The history of East Asian nations from the 19th century to the 
present, with emphasis on political, economic, social, and intellectual 
developments. (No prerequisite.) 



68 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

History 330 — The history of Russia in the twentieth century 

(5-0-5). 

Home Economics 

Home Economics 232 — Nutrition (5-0-5). 

The requirements of different individuals for energy, protein, 
minerals and vitamins; foods as a source of daily requirements, and 
the relation of food and the state of nutrition of an individual to 
physical fitness. 

Home Economics 235 — Nutrition Education for Teachers (5-0-5). 

A study of the diet habits of Georgia school children and the re- 
lation of nutrition to health. Emphasis is placed on how teachers 
can enrich school and community programs and improve the health 
of school children through nutrition education. 



Mathematics 

Mathematics 9 — Intermediate Algebra (5-0-5). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. 

Some elementary properties of real numbers are studied. This 
includes a survey of the field properties of the set of real numbers. 
Properties of powers, roots, and absolute value are treated. The axioms 
for the order relation are given, and an introduction to solution of 
inequalities is given. 

An introductory study of axiomatic systems and symbolic logic 
precedes elementary set theory, functions, and graphs of functions. 
Some concepts from the theory of numbers, and the theory of poly- 
nomials are also studied. 

Mathematics 100 (5-0-5), Integrated Algebra and Trigonometry. 

A short review of elementary operations with real numbers 
is given. The concepts of function, and the graph of a function are 
emphasized. Special emphasis is placed upon logarithmic and expon- 
ential functions and their graphs. The trigonometric functions are 
defined by the unit circle definition; various properties of the trigo- 
nometric functions are developed. Some aspects of complex numbers 
are considered before the theory of equation is studied. The theorv 
of matrices and determinants is applied in the solution of systems of 
equations. After some basic concepts of sequences are given, mathe- 
matical induction is studied and applied to sequences of statements. 
The theory of inverse functions includes the inverse trigonometric 



i 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 69 

functions and their graphs. Methods of finding sohition sets for trigo- 
nometric equations are considered. 

Inchided in this course are the main topics from Mathematics 
101 and Mathematics 102. It is recommended for students transfer- 
ring to the Georgia Institute of Technology or other engineering 
schools. 

Students who are transferring to colleges in which such an 
integrated course is required should be advised to consult with Mr. 
Stubbs concerning their qualifications for admission to Mathematics 

100. 

Mathematics 101 — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisites: Two units high school algebra or Mathe- 
matics 9. 

A brief review of some elemental^ properties of real numbers is 
given. Some general characteristics of axiomatic systems are ex- 
amined. A relatively thorough (but non-axiomatic) development of 
s\Tnbolic logic and set theory is given. The concept of function is 
defined from that of ordered pairs. Basic theory of numbers and poly- 
nomials is studied. An axiomatic development of the structure of the 
set of real numbers Is given. This includes completeness and the 
Dcdekind theorem. The set of complex numbers is described. A care- 
ful study of algebraic functions and their graphs precedes the theory 
of equations. 

Matric techniques are applied to the theory of systems of equa- 
tions. The theory of sequences, mathematical induction, and proba- 
bility are also treated. 

Mathematics 102 — Trigonometry (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. 

After a review of the concepts of function and complex num- 
bers the exponential function, and its inverse, the logarithmic func- 
tion, are studied. The remaining elementary transcendental functions 
(the elementary trigonometric functions and their inverses) are 
treated. The standard properties of the elementary transcendental 
functions are developed: this Includes Identities, the definition of the 
trigonometric functions of angles, and some physical applications. 

The theory of vectors is Introduced with some applications, and 
the geometric Interpretation of complex numbers is given; DeMoIvre's 
theorem is proved. 

Some special topics are considered which include introductory 
point set topology, complex functions, and infinite series. 



70 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Mathematics 103 — Mathematics of Finance (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics lOL 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting; 
the operation of the compound-interest law in business; simple prob- 
lems concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties and 
annuities. Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. The 
necessary aids and short cuts and use of tables and logarithms will be 
studied. 

Mathematics 104 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 102. 

First, some review topics from algebra are considered. From 
analytic geometry the concepts of coordinates, graphs of equations, 
the distance formula, and equations of Hnes are presented. The funda- 
mental concept of the calculus, the concept of limit of a function, is 
carefully presented using the epsilon-delta definition; the limit the- 
orems are proved. Thus, a foundation for the study of continuity 
and differentiability is laid. Applications of the derivative include a 
thorough study of the extrema of functions and inflection points. 

Mathematics 201 — Calculus (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 104. 

Conic sections are first studied. The development of the definite 
integral by using Riemann Sums is based upon some properties of 
the real numbers, e.g. least upper and greatest lower bounds of sets 
of real numbers, and the completeness property. A study of the inter- 
mediate value theorems is followed by some applications of the inte- 
gral. Differentiation of transcendental functions, and elementary 
formal integration are also considered. 

Mathematics 202 — Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 201. 

Methods of advanced formal integration which include integra- 
tion by parts and partial fractions are studied. Some applications are: 
Simpson's Rule, centroids of solids of revolution and of a plane area. 
Basic properties of continuous and differentiable functions are con- 
sidered carefully. Methods of parametric equations and polar coordi- 
nates are studied with applications. The theory of infinite series 
includes differentiation and integration of power series. 

Mathematics 203 — Calculus (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 202. 

Solid analytic geometry precedes a study of vectors in two and 
three dimensions. Partial differentiation is carefully presented, and 



I 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 71 

a proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra is given. MuUiple 
integration is presented with applications. Cylindrical and spherical 
coordinates are also considered. 

Mathematics 235 — An Introduction to Finite Mathematics 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisites: Math 102 or consent of Instructor. 

An introduction to logic and set theory give some insight into 
modem concepts in mathematics. The probability theory which is 
studied involves probability measure, conditional probability, finite 
stochastic processes, and the law of large numbers. The study of the 
theory of vectors and matrices includes the development of the usual 
vector and matric operations, and linear transformations; this pre- 
cedes some concepts from linear programming. Applications are given 
to the behavioral sciences with some applications to genetics. 

Mathematics 238 — Finite Mathematical Structures (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Consent of the Department Chairman. 

The content of this course is similar to that of Mathematics 235; 
however, it is more advanced, and the approach is more rigorous. 

Mathematics 204 — Introduction to Statistics (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 101. 

Mathematics 305 — Differential Equations (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 203. 

Mathematics 400 — Foundations of Analysis (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Consent of the instructor. 

Mathematics 401-404 — Mathematical Analysis (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 203 or consent of the instructor. 



Music 

Music no— Music Theory (3-0-3). Fall. 

An introduction to the basic theoretical principles of music. 

Music n\— Music Theory (3-0-3). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 110 with emphasis on part-writing of 
triads and their inversions. 

Music 112 — Music Theory (3-0-3). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 112 through inversions of the dominant 
seventh chord and secondary seventh chords. 

Music lOl— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Fall. 

A study of sight singing techniques applied to diatonic materials. 



72 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Music \02— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 101. 

Music 103 — Sight Singijig (2-0-1). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 102. 

Music 2\0— Music Theory (3-0-3). Fall. 

A continuation of the study of basic materials with emphasis 
on secondary seventh chords and simple modulation. 

A^usic 2\l— Music Theory (3-0-3). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 210 introducing altered chords and 
modulation to remote keys. 

Music 212 — Music Theory (3-0-3). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 211 emphasizing chromatic materials. 

Music 201— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Fall. 

A study of sight singing techniques applied to chromatic mate- 
rials. 

Music 202— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 201. 

Music 203— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 202. 

Music 200 — Music Appreciation (5-0-5). 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy fine 
music. Analysis of form, style and mediums of musical expression 
from the great periods of musical art. Lectures, discussions and re- 
corded sessions comprise the course. 

Music 115 a,b,c — Applied Music. 2 hours credit per quarter. 

One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee $48.00. 

Music 215 a,h,c — Applied Music. 2 hours credit per quarter. 

A continuation of Music 115c. Special fee $48.00. 

Philosophy 

Philosophy 110 — Introduction to Philosophy (5-0-5). 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of 
philosophy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the rela- 
tion of philosophy to art, science and religion. Includes a survey of 



I 



i 



COURSE DESCRll^nONS 73 

the basic issues and major types in philosophy, and shows their sources 
in experience, history and representative tliinkers. 

Philosophy 222— Honors Scmifiar (5-0-5). 

The Honors Seminar will study some aspects of the nature of 
man in the natural world. The aim of the seminar will be to integrate 
what has been approached as specialization in the general curriculum. 
Instructors from the natural sciences, the humanities and the social 
sciences will serve as discussion leaders. 

This coiuse is open by invitation to sophomores placed on the 
Permanent Dean's List at the end of their freshman year and to other 
sophomores who are recommended by their advisors. 

Philosophy 320 — Introduction to Oriental philosophy (5-0-5). 



Physical Education 

Physical Education 111 — Conditioning Course (0-3-1). Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carries, 
road work, duel combatives, and simple games. 

Physical Education 112 — Team Sports (0-3-1). Winter. 
Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 113 — Elementary Swimming (0-3-1). Spring. 

"^Physical Education UA— Officiating oj Basketball (1-3-2). \Vin- 
ter. Prerequisite: P. E. 112 or equivalent. 

Consists of a study of rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substitute for P. E. 112. 

^Physical Education 20^— First Aid (3-0-1). Winter. 
The American Red Cross standard course in first aid. 

Physical Education 201 — Elementary Tennis (0-3-1). Fall. 

"^Physical Education 203 — Senior Life Saving and Instructors' 
Course in Swimming (2-3-2). Spring. May be substituted for Physical 
Education 113. 



•Elective unless substituted as written in course description. 



74 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Physical Education 205— Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 206 — Modern Dance for Women (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 207 — Tap Dance for Beginners (0-3-1). Win- 
ter. 

Physical Education 208 — Adult Recreative Sports (0-3-1). Spring. 

Golf, ping-pong, pool, card games, chess, checkers and other quiet 
games. 

Physical Education 232— Bowling (0-3-1). Winter. 

Physical Science 

Physical Science 101 (5-0-5). Fall. No prerequisite. 

A study of the scientific method and its use in man's solutions of 
problems in his physical environment. The student learns the funda- 
mentals of physics and acquires familiarity with the basic formulas 
and principles. He learns the similarity of the application of principles 
involving small particles to larger or planetary particles. If student 
has completed a course in college physics, no credit will be given for 
this course. 

Physical Science 102 (5-0-5). Winter. No prerequisite. 

In this course emphasis is placed on the study of the principles of 
inorganic and organic chemistry with some examples of the application 
of chemistry in household, industry, medicine, biology, geolog)', etc. 
Here the knowledge of the structure of the fundamental particles of 
matter (atoms and molecules) is used in the study of the classification 
of the simple components of matter (elements) and the changes which 
they undergo to form more complex substances (compounds). If the 
student has completed a course in college chemistry, no credit will be 
given for this course. 

Physical Science 103 (5-0-5). Spring. No prerequisite. 

A survey of elementary geology and astronomy. This course 
covers what might be termed a "Biology of the Earth", concerning 
itself with earth materials, weather and climate, rocks and minerals, 
erosion and sedimentation, vulcanism and diastrophism, the law of 
uniform change and earth history as interpreted from the rock record. 
Upon completion of this phase the course progresses to the astronomy 
phase and the study of the stars and galaxies. Starting with the 
planetary system of our own sun, the study proceeds to the other 
stars and stellar systems, including, of course, the nebulae. Finally, 



I 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 75 

the course covers general relativity and cosmology, entering the fron- 
tiers of Physical Science to conjecture on the "science of tomorrow." 



Physics 

Physics 204— General Physics— Mechanics (4-2-5). Fall. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 and 102 or consent of the in- 
structor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of mechanics. Force and motion, work and power, 
energ)', torque, and properties of gases are included. 

Physics 205 — General Physics — Electricity (4-2-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisites: Math 101 and 102 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of magnetism, electric circuits, electric energy and power, 
electromagnetic induction, and principles of alternating current. 

Physics 206 — General Physics — Heatj Sound, and Light (4-2-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Math 101 and 102 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of heat, sound and light. Under heat will be studied tem- 
perature measurement, thermal expansion, heat quantities, heat trans- 
fer, and thermodynamics. The study of sound includes wave motion, 
sound waves, and acoustics. Light includes reflection, refraction, spec- 
tra, color, and optics. 

Physics 207 — Mechanics, Sound and Heat (5-3-6). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 104 or 201. (This course may be taken con- 
currently. ) 

Physics 207, 208 and 209 together constitute a thorough course 
in basic physics for engineering students. This course includes classi- 
cal physics, and an introduction to modern physics (to which more 
than one quarter of the three courses is devoted) including the 
quantum theory of radiation, atomic structure, relativity, X-Ray, wave 
versus corpuscular propagation, natural radioactivity, nuclear reac- 
tions, and artificial radioactivity, nuclear energy and cosmic rays, and 
the fundamental particles. 

The five classroom hours each week include some lectures and 
films, but the solution of a large number of problems is required, 
including application of the elements of the calculus. 

The laboratory work is designed to give practice in the art of 
making precise measurements, proficiency in the manipulation of 
apparatus and added familiarity with some of the concepts of physics. 



76 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

The theory of errors is stressed enough to give students the ability 
to decide under what conditions the greater expense of more precise 
measurements is justified. 

Physics 207 is an intensive course in mechanics, sound and heat. 
It includes the study of statics^ kinetics, friction, work, power, energy, 
momentum, machines, elasticity, fluid mechanics, harmonic motion, 
wave motion and vibrating bodies, temperature-expansion, heat trans- 
fer, work and heat, and the laws of thermodynamics. 

Physics 208 — Electricity, Magnetism and Basic Light Through 
Geometric Optics. (5-3-6). Winter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or 
201. 

Physics 208 is an intensive course in electricity, magnetism, and 
geometric optics. It includes the study of the ideal gas and the atomic 
view of matter, static electricity, current electricity, magnetism, mag- 
netic fields, electromagnetic induction, capacitance, inductance, alter- 
nating currents, electrical instruments, electromagnetic waves, nature 
and propagation of light, reflection and refraction, mirrors and lenses, 
optical instruments. 

Physics 209 — Light Phenomena and Modern Physics. (5-3-6). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or 201, and Physics 208. 

Physics 209 continues the study of the phenomena of light, in- 
cluding interference, diffraction, and polarization; and then proceeds 
into modern physics via the quantum theory of radiation, atomic 
structure, and the theories of relativity (see Physics 207, above). Dur- 
ing this quarter laboratory work is on a "senior course" level and is 
designed to encourage independent thought and to deviate definitely 
from the somewhat stereotyped work of the preceding quarters. 



Political Science 

Political Science 112 — The Governments of Foreign Powers. 
(5-0-5). 

A study is made of the leading modem political theories, and 
attention is paid to the structure and powers of the major foreign gov- 
ernments. 

Political Science 113 — Government of the United States (5-0-5). 
Fall, Winter and Spring. 

A study is made of the structure, theory, and workings of the na- 
tional government in the United States and some of the major prob- 
lems of the state and local government. The course shows how de- 
velopmental practice has created our government as it stands today. 



COURSE DESCRIP'riONS 77 

Political Science 114 — Totalitarianism and the Free World: Crisis 
in Civilization (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course examines dispassionately the various poHtical ideologies 
which contend for men's allegiance in the twentieth century: prin- 
cipally fascism, nazism, and communism against the political and 
economic systems of the free world. 

Political Science 320 — International Relations: The Far East 
(5-0-5). 

Psychology 

Psychology 100 — Psychology of Adjustment (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, 
Spring. 

This course is an orientation into college and into the choice of 
a career. Objective aids developed in the field of psychology will 
be used to discover effective ways of learning in general, and of 
studying in the college setting. Methods of objective measurements 
of a person's intelligence, interests, special aptitudes and personality 
traits will be explored and demonstrated. These will be applied to 
problems of educational, vocational, and special interest training. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the understanding of learning pro- 
cesses and the motivation of behavior. 

Psychology 201 — Introduction to Psychology (5-0-5). Fall, Win- 
tre. Spring, and Summer. 

Psychology studies individual behavior by use of various adapta- 
tions of scientific observation. This course works with the evidence 
and concepts pertaining to primary behavior processes which sys- 
tematic observation has explored. These topics, basic to understand- 
ing human behavior, include scientific methodology in psychology, 
heredity and patterns of growth, processes of learning and retention, 
adjustment processes as affected by motivation, emotions, and adapta- 
tions to frustration and conflict, sensory-perceptual processes leading 
to objective observation, and the use of these interacting processes for 
thinking purposefully, objectively, logically and creatively. By the end 
of the course the student is expected to be able to see these processes 
interacting in a given example of behavior. Principles from research 
are applied to areas of individual differences, personality formation, 
social behavior and abnormal behavior. 

Psychology 202-203 — Introduction to Psychology with experi- 
ments. (10-0-10). Fall-Winter. 

The subject matter of Psychology 201 will be duplicated in this 
course extended over a two quarter sequence. Laboratory projects. 



78 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

demonstrations, and individual experiments will be scheduled in con- 
nection with topics listed in Introduction to Psychology to teach and 
illustrate the various scientific methods of observation used in psy- 
chology: experimental method, field studies, statistical methods, and 
clinical or case study methods of observation. It is recommended that 
students expecting to major in psychology or who have a particular 
interest in preparing for the helping professions select this two quarter 
sequence. 

Psychology 206 — Educational Psychology (5-0-5). Summer. 

Special emphasis is placed upon developing competencies on the 
part of the prospective elementary and high school teachers in under- 
standing and applying the psychological principles involved in the 
learning and development of children and youth. Supervised visits 
will be made to schools for observation and study, when possible. 

Psychology 303 — Social Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Perquisite: 
Psychology 20 L 

This course centers on a study of the individual's interaction with 
his social groups (family, friendship groups, clubs, church groups, 
community groups). Forces of need, emotion and interests that bind 
the individual to his groups and the dynamic forces of group inter- 
action are analyzed. The live laboratory of the class itself is used 
for experiencing the processes of communication and interaction in 
a group setting. Special topics of attitude formation, leadership, 
group c(''iflicts, social stratification, mass communication, propaganda, 
public opinion formation and methods of changing group patterns are 
studied by consulting the reports of responsible studies and by group 
projects. 

Psychology 304 — Psychology of the Abnormal (5-0-5). \Vinter. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 

This course includes a study of the various forms of emotional 
illness and maladjustment, including mental deficiency and anti- 
social behavior. These processes will be related to basic principles 
of human behavior that are included in Introductory Psychology-. 
Trips to city and state facilities will be arranged for the observation 
of diagnostic and treatment procedures. The course is planned 
especially for students going into the helping professions. 

Psychology 305 — Child and Adolescent Psychology (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Psychology' 201. 

This course presents tested information on how growth, develop- 
ment and learning affect the behavior of human beings from concep- 
tion through childhood and adolescence. Systematic study of responsi- 
ble research in this field, from life-study, clinical and experimental 
research methods, is the basis for class seminar and lecture. To supple- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 79 

nient study of the literature projects are planned for direct observa- 
tion of child behavior in a nursery school, in various elementary school 
classes and in informal settings. When possible, special areas receive 
special study, such as testing programs, problems of exceptional chil- 
dren, child therapy or typical problems in child-parent relations and 
child placement. 

Russian 

Russian \0\-\02—Eleme7itary Russian (10-0-10). 

This course consists of grammar, composition, conversation, read- 
ing and dictation. No credit will be allowed toward graduation until 
the sequence is completed. 

Social Science 

Social Science 104 — Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5). 

A study of current economic and social statistics as pertaining to 
agriculture, industry and commerce, population trends and govern- 
mental organizations and problems. 

Sociology 

Sociology 201 — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, 
Spring and Summer. 

Sociology is the scientific study of human behavior at the group 
level. This course presents material which has been gathered by sys- 
tematic and objective studies of human society. Material is introduced 
from the fields of cultural anthropology and social psychology. In this 
way an understanding is gained not only of the function of culture as 
a factor in the socialization of the individual but also of the role of the 
individual as a member of his own society. Attention is then turned to 
some of the major institutions of this society, and finally to a theoreti- 
cal consideration of the operation of social processes. 

Sociology 202 — Preparation for Marriage and Family Living 
(5-0-5). Spring. 

This course is designed as a functional approach to the problems 
associated with mate selection and marital adjustment in our society. 
As a background to the study of marriage and family living, the 
family as an institution is studied using a cross-cultural analysis of 
different societies. Each stage of preparation for marital adjustment 
is discussed including: dating, courtship, engagement, sex, financial 
adjustment, religion, recreation, friends, and children. A prominent 
medical specialist serves as a guest lecturer in the discussion of physi- 



80 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

cal adjustment in marriage and parenthood. Other guest lecturers 
include representatives from the different religious faiths to discu<:s 
the problems associated with interfaith marriages. In this course the 
student is provided with information which will encourage a mature 
and objective approach to the problems and responsibilities inherent 
in marriage and parenthood in our society today. 

Sociology 303 — Community and Social Problems (5-0-5). Fall. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 201. 

The purpose of this course is to study the facts, problems, and 
programs of community life, using Savannah and Chatham County as 
resources to supplement information from responsible scientific studies 
available in the professional literature. In addition to exploring the 
nature and origins of social problems in general, attention will be di- 
rected to such special areas as community physical and mental health, 
problems of poverty, unemployment, education, government, juvenile 
and adult crime, care for dependent children, housing, recreation, re- 
sources for the aged, problems of community planning, and group con- 
flicts. This course will include seminar discussion, individual study 
of some problems of special interest, guest speakers and selected field 
trips. This additional knowledge, understanding and experience with 
systematic study of community life is aimed to contribute to the stu- 
dent's constructive involvement, as a citizen, in the life of his com- 
munity. 

Spanish 

Spanish 101-102— Elementary (10-0-10). Fall and \Vinter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. No 
credit for graduation will be given until sequence is completed. No 
credit will be given for these courses if two years of high school Spanish 
have been completed. 

Spanish 201 — Intermediate (5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Two quarters of college Spanish or two years of 
high school Spanish. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammar, conversation and readings. 



I 



INDEX 

Absences 35 

Accelerated Program for High School Students 31-32 

Administration ^>-7 

Admission to Class ^> ^ 

Admission to College 16-21 

Admission of Foreign Students 20 

Admission of Former Students 19 

Admission to Summer Probationai7 Quarter 20 

Admission by Transfer (Advanced Standing) 18-19 

Admission of Veterans 20 

Advanced Placement 31 

Advisers 3 1 

Aims -- 13 

Alumni Office 25 

Art, Comse Descriptions 54 

Associate Degree .. 13, 45-53 

Athletics .^ — . 26 

Attendance Regulations 35 

Auditing 34 

Bachelors' Degrees 40-44 

Biology, B.S. Degree Requirements 41-42 

Biology, Course Descriptions 55-56 

Board of Regents 5 

Botany, Course Descriptions .- ..- -. 55 

Business Administration, B.B.A. Degree Requirements 42-44 

Business Administration, Course Descriptions 56-59 

Business Administration, Two-Year Program 45, 51-52 

Calendar— 1965-66 3-4 

Chemistry, B.S. Degree Requirements 41-42 

Chemistry, Course Descriptions 59-60 

Chemistry, Two-Year Program 46 

Chinese, Course Descriptions 60 

College Commission 6 

College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic Aptitude Test 16 

Commerce, Course Descriptions 60-61 

Commerce, Secretarial, Two-Year Program 52 

Commerce, Stenographic 53 

Community Services 15 

Conduct . .; 34 

Counseling 21-22 

Course Load _._ 34 

Course Descriptions 54-80 

Dean's List, (See Honors) 36-37 

Dismissal from College 37 

Dramatics (Masquers) 25 

81 



INDEX- (Continued) 

Economic Opportunity Act 24 

Economics, Course Descriptions 61-62 

Education, Course Descriptions 62-63 

Engineering, Course Descriptions 63 

Engineering, Tvvo-Year Program 46 

English, B.A. Degree Requirements 40-41 

English, Course Descriptions 63-65 

Entrance Requirements 16-21 

Evening Program 14 

Expenses 27-30 

Faculty 8-12 

Fees - 27-30 

Financial Aids 22-24 

Forestry, One-Year Program 50 

Four- Year Programs 40-44 

French, Course Descriptions 65 

General Educational Development Tests 17 

General Information 13-15 

Geography, Course Descriptions 66 

Georgia and U.S. History- Tests .3-4, 38 

German, Course Descriptions 66 

Glee Club 25 

Grades 36 

Graduation, Requirements for 38 

Health, Course Descriptions 66 

History of the College . 14 

Histor)', B, A. Degree Requirements ,...40-41 

Histor)', Course Descriptions 66-68 

Home Economics, Course Descriptions 68 

Honor Points 36 

Honors 36-37 

Industrial Management, Two- Year Program 46 

International Relations 77 

Late Registration Fee 27 

Liberal Arts, Two- Year Program. 46, 52-53 

Library 14-15 

Masquers 25 

Mathematics, Course Descriptions 68-71 

Mathematics, Two-Year Program . 47 

Medical Technology, Two-Year Program 47 

Music (See Glee Club) 25 

Music, Course Descriptions 71-72 

Music, Two-Year Program 50 

Non-Resident Fee 27 

Philosophy, Course Descriptions 72-73 

82 



I 
I 



INDEX-(Conlinued) 

Physical Education Program 33 

Physical Education, Course Descriptions 73-74 

Physical Education, Two- Year Program 47 

Physical Science, Course Descriptions 74 

Physics, Course Descriptions 75-76 

Physics, Two- Year Program 48 

Placement Service 24 

Placement Tests 33 

Political Science, Course Descriptions 76-77 

Pre-Dental, Two- Year Program 48 

Pre-Medical, Two- Year Program 48 

Pre-Nursing, One-Year Program 51 

Pre-Optometry, Two-Year Program 49 

Pre-PhaiTnacy, Two-Year Program 49 

Pre-Veterinary, One-Year Program 51 

Probation, Academic 37 

Programs, Armstrong State College 13, 40-53 

Psychology, Course Description 77-79 

Publications 26 

Recommendations 38 

Refunds . 29-30 

Regents, Board of 5 

Regulations — General 31-39 

Reports and Grades 36 

Russian, Course Descriptions 79 

Scholarships - 22-23 

Secretarial, Two-Year Program 52 

Social Science, Course Descriptions 79 

Sociology, Course Descriptions. 79-80 

Spanish, Course Descriptions 80 

Speech 64 

Stenographic, One-Year Program 53 

Student Activities 25-26 

Student Affairs 16-26 

Student Assistants 24 

Student Center 26 

Student Government 25 

Student Publications 26 

Teaching, Two-Year Program 50 

Two-Year Programs 45-53 

Withdrawal from College 35 

Zoology, Course Descriptions 55-56 



83 



1966-1967 



Summer Fall Winter Spring 

Bulletin of 

Armstrong State College 

Savannah, Georgia 

A Four-year College of the 
University System of Georgia 




Membership in 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



V^olunie XXXI Number 6 



1966 



CALENDAR 



1966 





APRIL 










JULY 








OCTOBER 




S M 


T W T 


F 

1 


S 

2 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 

1 


S 
2 


S 


M T W T F 


S 

1 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


9 


3 4 5 6 7 


8 


10 11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 


15 


17 18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 


24 25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


24 
31 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


23 
30 


24 25 26 27 28 
31 


29 


MAY 


AUGUST 


"s"" 


NOVEMBER 




S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


1 2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 




12 3 4 


5 


8 9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 


15 16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 


29 30 


31 






28 


29 


30 31 






27 


28 29 30 




JUNE 


S 


SEPTEMBER 
M T W T F 


S 


DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


s 


M T W T F 


S 




1 2 


3 


4 






I 


2 


3 




1 2 


3 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


26 27 


28 29 30 






25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 




25 


26 27 28 29 30 


31 



1967 



CALENDAR 



1967 



I 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 



12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 

MARCH 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 





APRIL 






S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


2 3 


4 5 6 


7 


1 
8 


9 10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


23 24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


30 








MAY 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


7 8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


28 29 


30 31 






JUNE 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 




1 


2 


3 


4 5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


11 12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


18 19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


25 26 


27 28 29 


30 





JULY 



S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



AUGUST 



S M T W T F S 



6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 



12 3 4 5 

8 9 10 11 12 

15 16 17 18 19 

22 23 24 25 26 

29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 



S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



CALENDAR FOR 1966 - 1967 



Summer Quarter, 1966 

May 1 : Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all 

papers required in the application for admission. 

May 31: Last day for transient students (for Summer Quarter 

only) to file all papers required in the application 
for admission. 

June 13: Registration 8:30-11:00 Pre-advised students only. 

2:00- 4:00 Students not pre-advised, 
h:00- 8:00 new and re-admitted stu- 
dents. 

June 14: Classes begin 

June 15: Last day to register for credit 

June 20: Last dav to change classes 

July 4: Holiday 

July 18: Mid-term reports due 

.\ugust 1 - 5 : Pre-advisement for Fall Quarter 

August 23-25: Examinations 



Fall Quarter, 1966 



September 1 : 




September 20 


-22 


September 22: 




September 23: 




September 26: 




September 27: 




September 30: 




November 7: 




November 2 1 : 




November 24 - 


25 


November 28- 




December 2: 




December 14- 


16: 



Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all 
papers required in the application for admission. 

Orientation for Freshmen 

Group advisement for all entering students 

Registration 8:30-11:00 Pre-advised students 

2:00- 4:00 Students not pre-advised, 
6:00- 8:00 new students, and re- 
admitted students. 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Mid-term reports due 

Ga. and U. S. history and government test 

Thanksgiving Holidays 

Pre-advisement for Winter Quarter 
Examinations 



December 12: 
January 2: 



January 3: 
I January 4: 
January 9: 
February 6: 
February 27 - 
March 3 
March 14- 16: 



Winter Quarter, 1967 

Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all 
papers required in the application for admission. 

Registration 8:30- 11 : 00 Pre-advised students only. 
2:00- 4:00 Students not pre-advised, 
6:00- 8:00 new and re-admitted stu- 
dents. 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for Spring Quarter 
Examinations 



Spring Quarter, 1967 



March 1 : Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all 

papers required in the application for admission. 

March 22: Registration 8:30-11:00 Pre-advised students only. 

2:00- 4:00 Students not pre-advised, 
6:00- 8:00 new and re-admitted stu- 
dents. 

March 23: Classes begin 

March 24: Last day to register for credit 

March 29: Last day to change classes 

April 24: Mid-term reports due 

May 8: Ga. and U. S. history and government test 

May 15- 19: Pre-advisement for Summer and Fall Quarters 

May 1 7 : Honors Day Assembly 

May 31 -June 2: Examinations 



Summer Quarter, 1967 



May 22: 
May 31: 

June 12: 



June 13: 
June 14: 
June 19: 
July 4: 
July 17: 
August 7-11: 
August 23-25; 



Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all 

papers required in the application for admission. 

Last day for transient students (for Summer Quarter 

only) to file all papers required in the application 

for admission. 

1 1 : 00 Pre-advised students only. 
4:00 Students not pre-advised, 
8:00 new and re-admitted stu- 
dents. 



Registration 8:30 
2:00 
6:00 



Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Holiday 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for Fall Quarter 

Examinations 



I 



Fall Quarter, 1967 



September 1 : 

September 19 thru 
September 21 : 

September 22: 

December 1 3 - 15: 



Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all 
papers required in the application for admission. 

Orientation for Freshmen 

Registration 
Examinations 



Regents, University System of Georgia 

244 Washington Slrctt, S.W. — Fourth Floor 
ATLANTA 



State at Large — Charles A. Sinithgall 

(January 10, 1966 - January K 1967) 

State at Large — Jack Adair 

(January 13, 1965 - Januar>' 1. 1971) 

State at Large — Roy V. Harris ... 

(February 19, 1960 -January 1, 1967) 

State at Large — John A. Bell, Jr. 

(January 1, 1963 -January 1. 1970) 

State at Large — Carey Williams 

(January 1, 1962 -January 1, 1969) 

First — Anton F. Solms, Jr. 

(January 1, 1962 -January 1, 1969) 

Second — John L Spooner 

(January 1, 1961 -January 1. 1968) 

Third — T. Hiram Stanley . 

(January 13, 1965 -January 1, 1972) 

Fourth— H. G. Pattillo... 

(February 5, 1965 -January 1, 1970) 

Fifth — Jesse Draper 

(January 1, 1961 -January- 1, 1968) 

Sixth — James C. Owen, Jr. 

(February 5, 1965 -January 1, 1971) 

Seventh — James V. Carmichael 

(January 19, 1966 -January 1, 1973) 

Eighth — John W. Langdale.. . 

(January 13, 1964 -January 1. 1971) 

Ninth — James A. Dunlap 

(January 10, 1966 -January 1. 1973) 

Tenth — G. L. Dickens, Jr.. -_ .._ 

(February 5, 1965 -January 1, 1972) 



Gainesville 

Atlanta 

Augusta 

Dublin 

Greensboro 

Savannah 

Donalsonville 

Columbus 

Decatur 
Atlanta 
Griffin 

Atlanta 

Valdosta 

Gainesville 

Milledgeville 



Officers and Staff of the Board of Regents 

Chairman James A. Dunlap 

Vice-Chairman John W. Langdale 

Chancellor George L. Simpson, Jr. 

Chancellor Emeritus Harmon W. Caldwell 

^M Executive Secretary L. R. Siebert 

Treasurer James A. Blissit 

Director, Plant and Business Operations ..J. H. Dewberry 

Director, Testing and Guidance ...John R. Hills 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Armstrong College Cominission 

The Commission controls certain endowment funds and scholarship 
funds. 



Dr. Irving Victor, Chairman 



2515 Habersham St. 
3204 Abercorn St. (H) 



236-7161 



*Mayor Malcolm Maclean 



The City Hall 

412 East 45th St. (H] 



232-8147 



*JuDGE Robert F. Lovett, Chmn. C & S Bank 

Chatham County Commissioners 301 Garrard .\venue 

*Dr. Thord M. Marshall, Supt. 208 Bull Street 

Board of Education 122 Winchester Drive 

*Mr. Josiah O. Hatch, President Palmer & Cay, Ins. 
Savannah Chamber of 
Commerce 



520 E. 45th Street 



234-5101 



236-4411 



234-6621 
232-3906 



i 



*Mr. Julian C. Halligan, Pres. 
Board of Education 



Halligan Building 



233-4792 



Mr. Edward J. Bartlett 



Union Bag-Camp Paper 
Corporation 



236-5771 



Mr. John Peters, Jr. 
Mr. Frank Barragan, Jr. 

Mr. John F. M. Ranitz, Jr. 
Mr. W. Harry Swicord 



DeRenne Apartments 236-0355 

618 E. Broughton St. 233-0121 

110 E. Oglethorpe .\venue 236-0287 
6904 Waters Avenue 

Liberty National Bank 233-4111 

807 Dvches Drive 355-8661 



i 



^Ex officio 



ADMINISrRATlON 



Offirers of Administration 

Henry L. Ash more President 

Joseph I. Killorin Dean of the College 

James T. Rogers Dean of Student Affairs 

Donald D. Anderson Associate Dean for Community Services 

Jack H. Padgett Registrar 

Ji'LE C Rossiter Comptroller 



Dale Price Director of Student Activities 

Mrs. Martha DeWitt Director of Financial Aid 

Mrs. Mary H. Strong ...Assistant to the Associate Dean 

for Community Services 

Mrs. Virginia M. Arey . Assistant to the Registrar 

in Charge of Admissions 



Heads of Departments 

Leslie B. Davenport, Jr. Biology 

Orange W. Hall Business Administration 

Fretvvell G. Crider Chemistry & Physics 

Albert T. Clarke Education 

James Harry Persse Fine Arts 

Roy Carroll History & Political Science 



Hugh Pendexter, HI Language & Literature 

F. Lane Hardy Mathematics 

Roy J. Sims Physical Education 

Robert H. Cormack Psychology & Sociology 

Regina YoAST Library 






ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Administrative Staff 

Miss Marjorie A. Mosley Secretary to the President 

Miss Elizabeth Howard Secretary to the Dean of the College 

Mrs. Peggy B. Strong Secretary to the Faculty^ 

Gamble Building 

Mrs. Magali R. Overman Secretary to the Faculty, 

Science Building 

Mrs. Virginia D. Nall Secretary to Dean of Student Affairs 

Mrs. Addine Leitch Secretary to the Alumni 

Mrs. Minnie McG. Campbell. Secretary to the Registrar 

Mrs. Bertis Jones '. IBM Operator 

Mrs. Joyce Weldy Secretary, Registrar's Office 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. LeGette Assistant to the Catalog Librarian 

Mrs. Josephine Edwards Catalogue Assistant 

Mrs. Eugenia Edwards Circulation Assistant 

Mrs. Eleanor Salter Secretary to the Librarian 

Mrs. Corinne H. MgGee Assistant to the Comptroller 

Mrs. Anne F. Patton Secretary to the Comptroller 

Mrs. Zeanna Henley Cashier 

Richard F. Baker Superintendent, Buildings 

& Grounds 

Ira Ryan Assistant Superintendent, 

Buildings & Grounds 

Thomas Nease Manager, Student Center 

Miss Elizabeth Pound Manager, Book Store 

Mrs. Launa Johns Telephone Operator 



t 



ADMINISTRATION 



THE FACULTY 

M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B., M.A., Baylor University 
Professor of English 

Donald D. Anderson, B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.A., George 
Peabody College; Ed. D., Auburn University 

Associate Dean for Community Services 

Ruth Arger, B.A., Oglethorpe University; M.A., University of 
Tennessee 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Betty J. Ashbrook, B.S., Western Carolina College; M.S., Clemson 
College 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Henry L. Ashmore, B.A.E., M.A.E., D.Ed., University of Florida 

President 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., University 
of Georgia 

Professor of History 

*]. Fred Beverly, A.B., M.A., Mercer University 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Dr. Sarvan K. Bhatia, B.A., M.A., Punjab University; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University 

Professor of Economics 

Frank A. Brimelow, A.R.T.C.S., Royal College of Advanced Tech- 
nology, Salford, England; M.S., Vanderbilt University 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

*John H. Brower, B.S., University of Maine; M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Massachusetts 

Part-time Professor of Biology 

Virginia Carr, B.A., Florida State University; M.A., University of 

North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of English 

Roy Carroll, B.A., Ouachita Baptist College; M.A., Ph.D., Vander- 
bilt University 

Head, Department of History and Political Science 
Professor of History 



Part-time Instructor. 



10 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Albert T. Clarke, M.S., Mercer University; Ed.D., Florida State 
University 

Head, Department of Education 
Professor of Education 

Mary Dan Coleman, B.S., G.S.G.W.; M.A., George Peabody College 
Assistant Professor of Education 

Robert H. Cormagk, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Head, Department of Psychology and Sociology 

Professor of Psychology 

William E. Coyle, A.B., Emory University; M.A., Georgetown 
University; Ph.D., Florida State University 

Associate Professor of History & Political Science 

Fretw^ell Crider, B.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
Head, Department of Chemistry and Physics 
Professor of Chemistry 

Emory S. Crosby, B.S., M.A., Western Kentucky State College; 
Ph.D., Cizmson University. 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Leslie B. Davenport, Jr., B.S., College of Charleston; M.S., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Head, Department of Biology 

Professor of Biology 

John Kenneth Davidson, B.S., M.A., University of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Josephine F. Davidson, B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 
M.A., Florida State University 

Catalogue Librarian 

Lamar W. Davis, B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina; Certified 
Public Accountant 

Professor of Business Administration | 

John L. M. desIslets, Col. (Ret.), B.S., United States Military' 
Academy 

Professor of Physics 

Martha DeWitt, A.B., Salem College; M.Ed., University of Virginia 

Director of Financial Aid 
John Donald Duncan, B.S., College of Charleston; M.A., University 
of South Carolina 

Assistant Professor of History 

Rossiter C. Durfee, B.A., M.A., Stanford University 
Instructor in English 
Director, ''Masquers" 

*Part-time Instructor. 



y 

I 



ADMINISTRATION 11 



Frederick C. Haas, B.B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Hofstra University 
Associate Professor of Business Administration 

Orange \V. Hall, B.S., Air Force Institute of Technology; M.B.A., 
Hofstra College; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Head, Department of Business Administration 
Professor of Business Administration 

Raymond Ralph Hall. B.A.. Mississippi State College; M.S., Auburn 
University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

F. Lane Hardy, A.B., Oglethorpe University; M.A., Emory University; 
Ph.D.. Ohio State University 

Head, Department of Mathematics 
Professor of Mathematics 

Richard Haunton. A.B., A.M., Indiana University; Ph.D. Emory 
University 

Associate Professor of History 

♦Reginald C. Haupt, Jr., L.L.B., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Business Administration 

♦Bernard Hirshberg, A.B., A.M., University of Michigan 
Instructor in Anthropology 

*Philip Hoffman. B.B.A., M.B.A., University of Georgia; Certified 
Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

♦Stanley Karsman. L.L.B., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Joseph I. Killorin. A.B., St. John's College; M.A., Columbia 
University 

Dean of the College 

Walter B. Laffer, B.S., Case Institute of Technology; Ph.D. Ohio 
State University 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

OsMos Lanier, Jr., B.A., LaGrange College; M.A., Auburn Uni- 
versity: Ph.D.. University of Georgia 

Associate Professor of History 

*James Harris Lewis, B.S., University of Georgia; L.L.B., Univer- 
sity of Virginia. 

Instructor in History and Political Science 



'Part-time Instructor. 



i 



12 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B.Mus., Converse College; B.A., Univer- 
sity of Georgia; M.A., Columbia University 

Professor of English and French 

^Patrick Lum, B.A., Earlham College; M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Illinois 

Part-time Professor of Biology 

John C. McCarthy, Jr., B.B.A., University of Miami; M.B.A., Uni- 
versity of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

*Francis L. Mannion, Jr., B.LE., University of Florida 
Instructor in Mathematics 

^Hinckley A. Murphy, A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Columbia 
University 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

John F. Newman, B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., Georgetown 
University; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Associate Professor of Political Science and History 

*John M. Parr, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Engineering | 

Jack H. Padgett, A.B., Wofford College; M.A., University of North 
Carolina 

Registrar 

Hugh Pendexter, III, A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., Northwestern 
University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Headj Department of Language and Literature 
Professor of English 

James Harry Persse, B.F.A., University of Georgia; M.M., Ph.D., 

Florida State University i| 

Head, Department of Fine Arts 11 

Professor of Music 

James L. Peyton, B.S., M.S., Marshall College 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physical Science 

Dale Price, B.A., Florida State University; M.A., Florida State Uni- 
versity 

Director, Student Activities 



*Part-time Instructor. 



ADMINISTRATION 13 



Virginia Ramsey, A.B., Vandeibilt University; M.A.T., Emory Uni- 
versity 

Instructor in English 

James T. Rogers, B.S., Delta State College; M.R.E., N.O.B.T.S.; 
Ed.D., Florida State University 

Dean of Student Affairs 

JuLE C. RossiTER, A.A., Armstrong State College 

Comptroller 

Lea Leslie Seale, B.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana; 
M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Professor of English and German 

James L. Semmes, B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.S., Florida 
State University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Roy Jesse Sims, B.S., David Lipscomb College; M.S., University of 
Tennessee 

Head, Physical Education Department 
Professor of Physical Education 
Baseball Coach 

Marcia Smith, B.S., University of Tennessee 

Instructor in Physical Education 

*WiLLiAM H. Stephens, B.S., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Cedrig Stratton, B.Sc, Nottingham University, England; Ph.D., 
Birkbeck College, London, England 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Mary H. Strong, A.B., University of West Virginia 
Director J Community Services 

Robert I. Strozier, A.B., University of Georgia; M.A., Ph.D., Florida 
State University 

Associate Professor of English 

Robert T. Stubbs, B.S., M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Professor of Mathematics 

Lawrence M. Tapp^ B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
Basketball Coach 



•Part-time Instructor. 



14 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

*Gail Y. Thee, A.B., Emory University 

Instructor in English 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B., Monmouth College; M.A., Northwest- 
ern University; Certificate in Psychiatric Social Work, Western 
Reserve University 

Professor of Psychology 

Francis M. Thorne, III, B.S., Stetson University; Ph.D., University 
of Georgia 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Marion Trentham, A.B., University of Georgia; B.S. in Library- 
Science, University of North Carolina 

Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Jean Wingate Vining, B.S., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Shorthand, Comptometer and Typing 

*Margie p. Westfall, A.B., A.M., University of Illinois 
Instructor in French 

Charles C. White, B.S., East Carolina College; M.A., Southern 
Illinois; Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
Assistant Professor of English 

William Swoll Winn, B.D., A.B., Emory University; M.A., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

Professor of Mathematics 

K. C. Wu, B.A., Grinnell College; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 
Professor of History and Political Science 

Regina Yoast, B.A., Texas Christian University; B.S. in Library- 
Science, Columbia University 

Librarian 



J 



I 

I 



•Part-time Instructor. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Arinstroii<i; Slate (^()He«i;e : 

Purpose and Prof^rarns 

A college is a community of teachers and students who organize 
their energies for the work of the mind. Success in college means that 
a student has acquired those liberating skills of the mind that enable 
a man or woman to live the most fruitful life possible for him or her; 
that he has discovered the usefulness of those skills for understanding 
the world and for living in it competently and conscientiously. 

Armstrong State College attempts to provide a climate where 
the student is induced to make connections between what he thinks 
and does and the best that has been thought and done. It is a climate 
intending to nourish the judging, critical and free man, responsible 
to himself and to his fellow man because he is developing and testing 
his own ideas and values. 

Here the student works under able teachers to acquire liberal 
arts, and with their aid to explore man and his world through 
the insights of the humanities, the natural sciences and the social 
sciences. For these studies are the core of every degree program. 

A student chooses a program of study leading to the degree best 
suited to his interest and vocational goal. 

Programs leading to the following degrees are offered. 

FOUR- YEAR DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of history, English, and music. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, chemistry, and 
mathematics. 

Bachelor of Business Administration in the fields of accounting, 
management, and economics. 

(Each of these degrees may be taken along with an education 
program leading to certification for secondary school teachings.) 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

For these degrees the full third year will be offered in 1966-67; 
the full fourth year in 1967-68; except for music, for which the third 
year will be offered in 1967, the fourth in 1968. 

TWO-YEAR DEGREE 

The Associate in Arts Degree is offered as preparation for higher 
degrees in the liberal arts and the professions, and for positions in 
business after two years of college. 

The student planning to transfer from Armstrong State College 
into a professional or academic major program not offered here 
should, at the beginning of his freshman year, consult the catalogue 



16 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

requirements of the school he plans to attend. Armstrong State Col- 
lege offers the first year of programs in forestry and veterinary medi- 
cine; the first two years of programs in engineering, industrial man- 
agement, physical education, physics, pharmacy; the first three 
years, or the entire pre-professional programs, in dentistry, law, 
medicine, optometry, and other fields. 

The Associate in Arts Degree in Nursing will be offered, begin- 
ning in September 1966. 

History of the College 

Armstrong State College was founded on May 27, 1935, as Arm- 
strong Junior College, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Savannah to meet a long felt need for a college in the community. 
The College was housed in the Armstrong Building, a gift to the city 
from the family of George F. Armstrong, and over the years built 
or acquired five more buildings in the neighborhood of Forsyth Park 
and Monterey Square. 

The College, as Armstrong College of Savannah, became a two- 
year unit of the University System of Georgia on January 1, 1959, 
under the control of the Regents of the University System. 

In 1962, the Mills Bee Lane Foundation purchased a new campus 
site of over 200 acres, selected by the Regents. The new campus, with 
seven new buildings, was occupied in December, 1965. 

In 1964, the Regents conferred upon Armstrong the status of a 
four-year college, with the right to offer the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Business Administra- 
tion. The first degrees will be conferred in June, 1968. The College 
now offers ten major programs leading to these degrees, and, in addi- 
tion, the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
and Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

The College community includes about 1600 students and 65 
full-time faculty members. 

Evening Classes 

In addition to the full daytime schedule, Armstrong offers a 
schedule of classes in the evening, including most of the required 
courses for many programs leading towards a degree. 

Students employed during the day must limit their enrollment 
to one or two courses each quarter. 

Library 

The Lane Library is a modern two-story handsomely equipped 
building completed in the winter of 1965. The building is completely 



i 



I 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

air condilioiu-d and has an excellent lighting system. Individual carrel 
desks are available on both floors. There is an attractively furnished 
periodical and newspaper room on the first floor. Individual study 
rooms for faculty members engaged in research are located on the 
second floor, as well as a seminar room, staff-faculty room, group 
study rooms and a typing room. All stacks arc open. 

The library collection numbers approximately 30,000 with ad- 
ditional documents and pamphlets. 

The library receives more than three hundred periodicals and 
eight newspapers. 

Services arid regulations are specified in the library handbook, 
available on request to the Librarian of the college. 

Office of Community Services 

Short Courses, Workshops and Institutes. These are planned, 
organized and administered by the Office in response to group inter- 
est, or to meet a community need brought to the attention of the 
Dean. All are offered on a non-credit basis and, except in a very 
few cases, there are no special requirements or prerequisites for 
admission. A separate bulletin describing all credit and non-credit 
evening classes is published each summer. An additional brochure of 
the non-credit courses and special events, under the heading of "The 
Seven-Thirty Series" is mailed out before the beginning of every 
quarter; anyone wishing to do so may have his name placed on this 
mailing list. Subjects covered vary widely; the series is designed to 
offer something to appeal to almost any adult taste, from Computer 
Programming to a survey of the leading religions of the United States. 
The Dean is always glad to arrange courses for candidates pre- 
paring to take professional examinations in engineering, insurance, 
real estate and many others; the college has been approved as an 
Examination Center for a number of these examinations. One-day 
workshops, such as the annual Writers' Workshop, are also planned 
and managed by this office. 

Alumni Office 

The prime purpose of the Alumni Office is to keep former stu- 
dents informed about the college, and to help them keep in touch 
with each other. Any person who at any time was matriculated as 
a regular student is eligible for membership in the Alumni Associa- 
tion, and upon payment of his dues will receive the quarterly news- 
letter, "The Geechee Gazette," and may vote and hold office in the 
Association. The Alumni Office assists in arranging class reunions, 
board meetings, and other functions. 



18 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

ADMISSIONS and FEES 

Application forms for admission to Armstrong State College are 
provided by the Admission Officer upon request. An application 
cannot be considered until all required forms are properly executed 
and returned to the Admissions Office, Applications must be on file 
in the Admissions Office at least twenty days before the opening of 
the quarter in which the applicant wishes to enter. Deadlines for 
submitting applications for the 1966-67 session are: 

For Summer Quarter, 1966 — May 1 (New freshmen and trans- 
fers) 

May 31 (Transient students — 
Summer only) 

For Fall Quarter, 1966 — September 1 

For Winter Quarter, 1967 — December 12 

For Spring Quarter, 1967 — March 1 

For Summer Quarter, 1967 — May 22 (New freshmen and trans- 
fers) 

May 31 (Transient students — 
Summer only) 

For Fall Quarter, 1967 — September 1 

The applicant must be at least sixteen years old on or before 
registration date and must give evidence of good moral character, 
promise of growth and development, seriousness of purpose, and a 
sense of social responsibility. Armstrong State College reserves the 
right to examine and appraise the character, the personality, and the 
physical fitness of the applicant. The College further reserves the 
right to examine any applicant by the use of psychological, achieve- 
ment, and aptitude tests and to require additional biographical data 
and an interview before the applicant is accepted or rejected. If an 
interview is required, the applicant will be notified. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to refuse to accept 
any or all of the credits from any high school or other institution, 
notwithstanding its accredited status, when the College determines 
through investigation or otherwise that the quality of instruction at 
such high school or other institution is for any reason deficient or 
unsatisfactory. The judgment of the College on this question shall be 
final. 

The Admissions Officer may refer any applicant to the Admis- 
sions Committee of the College for study and advice. The ultimate 
decision as to whether an applicant shall be accepted or rejected 
shall be made by the Admissions Officer subject to the applicant's 
right of appeal as provided in the policies of the Board of Regents 
of the University System. 






ADMISSION 19 



The Admissions Officer shall, as promptly as practirablt*, inform 
the applicant of the action taken upon his application. 

The College reserves the right to terminate acceptance ot appli- 
cations when enrollment capacity is reached. The College further 
reserves the right to reject an applicant who is not a resident of 
the State of Georgia. 

All students enrolled at Armstrong State College are required to 
sign the Honor Pledge at the time of their initial registration. For a 
detailed explanation of the Honor System see the REGULATIONS 
section of this catalogue. 

Specific requirements for admission are discussed below. 

Requirements for Freshman Applicants 

1. Certificate of graduation from an accredited high school 
(or successful completion of the General Educational Development 
Test [GED] with no score less than 45). 

2. A transcript of the applicant's high school record to be 
submitted by the high school directly to the College. 

3. A minimum of sixteen units of high school credit, including 
the following specific subjects: 

English — 4 units 

Mathematics — 2 units (One unit must be in algebra, al- 
though two units of algebra are desirable. For students 
entering the engineering or scientific fields, two units of 
algebra and one of geometry are needed.) 

Science — 2 units 

Social Studies — 2 units 

Other units sufficient to graduate. 

4. Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the 
College Entrance Examination Board. Official results of this test 
must be filed with the Admissions Office by the final date for sub- 
mitting application for the quarter in which the student wishes to 
enroll. 

The Scholastic Aptitude Test is given in December, January, 
March, May, and July. Students wishing to make application to take 
the test may secure application forms from their secondary school 
principal or counselor, or by writing directly to the College Entrance 
Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, or Box 
1025, Berkeley, California 94701, for an application form and the 
Bulletin of Information which is available without charge. 

5. Application fee of $10 which must accompany the applica- 
tion form. This fee does not bind Armstrong State College to admit 
the applicant nor does it indicate acceptance of the applicant's quali- 



20 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

fications. The fee will not be credited toward the matriculation fee 
in the event that the applicant is accepted as a student and it will 
not be refunded in the event that the applicant does not enroll as a 
student. An applicant who fails to enroll in the quarter for which 
he is accepted must reapply for admission if he wishes to enter the 
institution at a later time by resubmission of fee by the date specified. 

6. Physical examinations prior to admission are required for all 
entering students with the exception of the following: Evening stu- 
dents, special students, transient students, and auditors. 

On the basis of his achievement as reflected by his high school 
grades and on his potential ability as shown by his scores on the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test, an evaluation of each applicant's readi- 
ness to undertake college work will be made. Normally, a student 
with a predicted freshman average grade of "C" (2.0) or above will 
be admitted unconditionally to the quarter for which he applies. A 
student whose predicted freshman average grade falls between "D" 
and "C" (1.3 through 1.9) will normally be admitted on a trial basis 
to the Summer On Trial Program. (See SUMMER ON TRIAL 
PROGRAM below.) 



Advanced Placement 

Armstrong State College gives advanced placement, or in some 
cases college credit, for college level high school courses, on the basis 
of the high school teacher's recommendation, the student's grade on 
the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB, and approval 
by the appropriate department chairman of Armstrong State College. 

Placement in English and Mathematics 

On the basis of his scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test, a 
student will be placed in English and mathematics courses as follows: 

A student whose Verbal score on the SAT is 450 or above will be 
placed in English 101 which carries five quarter hours of credit. A 
student whose Verbal score is below 450 will be required to take 
English 99, a non-credit course. (See the regulation regarding this 
course under the course listing of The Bulletin.) 

A student whose Math score on the SAT is 475 or above will be 
placed in Math 105 or Math 101, whichever is required for his pro- 
gram of study. A student whose Math score is below 475 will be 
required to take Math 9, a non-credit course, and must achieve a 
grade of C before enrolling in Math 105 or Math 101. 

Beginning freshmen placed in English 99 or Math 9 are en- 
couraged to take these courses in the Summer Quarter, if possible, 
to enable them to enroll for regular college work in the Fall Quarter. 



ADMISSION 21 



ReqiiiiTiiionts for Transfer Applicants 

1. Transfer aj^plicants will follow the same ])rocediircs as fresh- 
man applicants, except that transfer applicants who will have achieved 
sophomore standing at the time of their entrance will not he required 
to submit their high school records. Such records may be required 
by the Admissions Office but normally the transcripts of previous 
college records will suffice in place of the high school record. A 
transfer applicant must ask the Registrar of each college he has 
previously attended to mail an official transcript of his record to 
the Admissions Office at Armstrong State College, regardless of the 
transferability of the credits. 

2. Transfer applicants with less than sophomore standing (less 
than 45 quarter hours completed) must meet entrance requirements 
of both freshman and transfer applicants and will be required to 
submit their high school records as well as transcripts of college 
records. 

3. A transfer applicant will not be eligible for admission to 
Armstrong State College unless he is eligible to return to the last 
college attended on the date he expects to enter Armstrong. A student 
who is on probation or suspension from another college because of 
poor scholarship or disciplinary reasons will not be eligible for 
admission. 

4. All transfer students must have an overall average of "C" 
or higher (as computed by the Armstrong State College grade point 
system) on all work attempted at all colleges previously attended 
to be considered for admission. 

5. Courses transferred for credit from other colleges or universi- 
ties must have an over-all average grade of "C" or better. Not more 
than ten (10) per cent of the transfer hours can be accepted with 
grades of "D." College credit will not be allowed for such courses 
as remedial English and remedial mathematics or courses basically 
of secondary school level. Credit for specific courses designated as 
"core curriculum" or "major" courses will not be allowed unless 
grades received are "C" or better. 

6. Credits earned at an institution which is not a member of 
the appropriate regional accrediting agency can be accepted on a 
provisional basis only. A student transferring from an institution 
which is not a member of the regional accrediting agency must 
achieve a "C" average on his first fifteen quarter hours of work at 
Armstrong in order to be eligible to continue. His transfer credits 
would then be evaluated in certain areas by examination. 

7. The amount of credit that Armstrong will allow for work 
done in another institution within a given period of time may not 
exceed the normal amount of credit that could have been earned 
at Armstrong during that time. A maximum of 100 quarter hours 



22 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

may hv transferred from a junior college. For a bachelor's degree, 
90 quarter hours of junior and senior level work will be required 
(except in certain approved programs in mathematics, the natural 
sciences, and music), of which the last 45 quarter hours in courses 
numbered 200 and above must be taken at Armstrong. At least half 
of the courses offered in the major field must be taken at Armstrong. 
8. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a 
degree may be taken by correspondence or extension courses. No 
correspondence courses may be used to meet requirements in the 
major field or the related field for the bachelor's degree. No cor- 
respondence courses may be taken while a student is enrolled at 
Armstrong State College. Correspondence credit will not be accepted 
for courses in English composition or foreign language. 



Special Students 

Applicants who possess a bachelor's degree or its equivalent and 
who wish to take courses for personal enrichment or advancement 
may be admitted as special students. Such an applicant will submit 
the application form and fee and will have official transcripts of his 
college records mailed to the Admissions Office by the final date for 
submitting applications for the quarter in which he wishes to enroll. 



Auditors 

Armstrong State College grants to certain persons who are not 
regularly admitted students special permission to audit courses. Such 
applicants will not be required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
given by the CEEB but must meet all other requirements for admis- 
sion and pay regular fees. A special form for permission to audit 
courses mav be obtained from the Admissions Office. 



Readmission of Former Students 

A student who has not been enrolled at Armstrong for one or 
more quarters must apply for readmission on a form provided by 
the Admissions Office. A former student who has not attended an- 
other college since leaving Armstrong may be readmitted provided 
he is not on suspension at the time he wishes to re-enter. A former 
student who has attended another college since leaving Armstrong 
must meet requirements for readmission as a transfer student or as 
a transient student, whichever is applicable. A student who is re- 
admitted after an absence from the College for more than two years 
must meet degree requirements as listed in the catalogue in effect 
at the time of his return. 



I 



ADMISSION 23 



Transient Students 

I'ransit-nt student status means that a student is admitted to 
Armstrong State College only for a specified period of time, normally 
a summer quarter, with the understanding that he is to return to 
his own college for the next quarter. An applicant for transient 
status must file a regular application form and submit a statement 
from his Dean or Registrar that he is in good standing and has 
permission to take specific courses at Armstrong to be transferred to 
his own institution when satisfactorily completed. Since transient 
students are not admitted as regular Armstrong students, transcripts 
of college work completed elsewhere are not usually required of such 
applicants. A transient student who wishes to remain at Armstrong 
longer than one quarter must submit an additional statement from 
his Dean or Registrar or he must meet all requirements for regular 
admission as a transfer student. 

Armstrong State College/High School 
Accelerated Program 

This program marks a new venture for this community in which 
college and high school join to challenge intellectually able young 
men and women to test their interests and their capacity to learn. 

The Program 

High school students who have completed the eleventh grade, 
who have met the criteria for admission to this program and who 
maintain its standards will be peiTnitted to enroll in one course each 
quarter at Armstrong State College while they complete the senior 
year of high school. Upon graduation from high school, these stu- 
dents will be admitted upon application as regular students of the 
College and will be given full college credit for the courses taken at 
Armstrong. 

Through this program, a student may complete over two- thirds 
of the freshman year of college before he begins his regular college 
career. 

The maximum number of college courses possible is: 

Summer 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Fall 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Winter 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Spring 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Summer (following high school 
graduation and admission to 
Armstrong 3 courses (15 qtr. hours) 

7 courses (35 qtr. hours) 



24 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

The College Courses 

Every student accepted in this program must take English 101: 
Composition as his first course. Thereafter he may choose any fresh- 
man course, with permission of his college adviser. 

Criteria of Admission 

The College will consider a student for this program only upon 
written recommendation of his high school principal. In the view of 
the College, it is only the principal who can judge the circumstances 
that may make the program valuable and practicable for any student. 

To be admitted to the program a student must satisfy all of these 
criteria: 

L written recommendation by the Principal of the high school; 

2. completion of the eleventh grade in an accredited high school; 

3. a combined verbal and math score of 1000 on CEEB tests; 

4. an average grade of B or better in academic subjects (Eng- 
lish, mathematics, science, social studies, languages) through 
the ninth, tenth and eleventh grades as averaged by the Arm- 
strong State College Admissions Officer. 

5. written permission of the parents. 

Standards 

A student forfeits the privilege of this program if in any quarter 
his grade in the college course is below C or his high school average 
in academic courses is below B. 

Procedure for Admission 

A high school principal may recommend students following the 
fifth six-week period of the students' eleventh year. The recom- 
mendation to the College must be made by May 15th if the student 
intends to begin in the summer. The principal may recommend 
following the full eleventh year by August 15th if the student intends 
to begin in the fall. 

Foreign Students 

A student from a country other than the United States who is 
interested in attending Armstrong must meet the following require- 
ments before application is made: 

1. He must have met the requirements of paragraph 3, under 
REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMAN APPLICANTS, in 
regard to units in the subjects required at Armstrong. 



ADMISSION 25 



2. He must have an official transcript of his academic record 
mailed to the Admissions Office at Armstrong with an offi- 
cial translation. 

3. He should take the SAT of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board in the testing center nearest his home and ask 
that the results be sent to Armstrong. 

If the applicant meets the academic requirements for admission, 
he will be sent an application form. After it has been returned and 
approved, the applicant will be sent an 1-20 Form (I-20A and 
I-lOB), which he can then take to the American Consul to ask for a 
student visa. 

Armstrong is a community college and has no dormitory or 
boarding facilities, so these must be arranged by any student who 
does not live in Savannah. 

No scholarships are available for students who are not legal resi- 
dents of Georgia. All foreign students must pay non-resident fees. 



Admission of Veterans 

After having been accepted at Armstrong State College and 
upon receipt of Certification of Eligibility and Entitlement from the 
Veterans Administration, veterans may attend under Public Law 
815 (disabled), Public Law 894 (disabled), Public Law 634 (war 
orphans), or Public Law 361 (children of permanently disabled vet- 
erans). Students under Public Law 361 or 634 should be prepared to 
pay tuition and fees at the time of registration. 

Applicants Sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or other 
community agencies must apply at least six (6) weeks before the 
beginning of any quarter to insure proper processing of application. 



Summer on Trial Program 

Freshman applicants who are residents of the Savannah area 
and who do not meet regular requirements for admission may be 
admitted on a trial basis to the Summer On Trial Program. Transfer 
students are not eligible for admission to this program. 

Before enrolling in the Summer On Trial Program, the student 
must sign a statement that he understands the following: 

1. Taking a minimum of 10 quarter hours of academic courses, 
he must achieve a grade point average of 1.7 for 10 quarter 
hours or 1.5 for 15 quarter hours work in order to be eligible 
for enrollment as a regular student in the Fall Quarter. 



26 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

2. He will not have met the terms of his admission if he with- 
draws from any course. 

3. Ordinarily no appeal will be considered if he fails to achieve 
the required average during the summer, and he will not be 
considered for readmission to Armstrong until he has com- 
pleted at least two quarters of college work at another insti- 
tution with a "C" average and until he has met all other 
requirements of transfer students. 

Financial Aid 

(See STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES section of this 

Bulletin for further information.) 

Registration and Orientation 

The first few days of the Fall Quarter are set aside as an orienta- 
tion period for new students to become acquainted with the College, 
its curriculum, extra-curriculum activities, student leaders, counselors, 
members of the faculty and the administration. Complete instructions 
concerning registration are made available to all students at the 
beginning of the registration period. Registration includes counseling, 
academic advisement, selection of courses, enrollment in classes, and 
payment of fees. Full details regarding orientation and registration 
are provided to all incoming students during the summer preceding 
their initial enrollment. 

Residency Requirements of the Board of Regents 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, the applicant must 
establish the following facts to the satisfaction of the Admissions 
Officer: 

1. A student who is under 21 years of age at the time he seeks 
to register or re-register at the beginning of any quarter will 
be accepted as a resident student only upon a showing by him 
that his supporting parent or guardian has been legally domi- 
ciled in Georgia for a period of at least twelve months im- 
mediately preceding the date of registration or re-registration. 

2. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as 
guardian of a non-resident minor, such minor will not be per- 
mitted to register as a resident student until the expiration 
of one year from the date of appointment, and then only 
upon proper showing that such appointment was not made to 
avoid payment of the non-resident fee. 

3. If a student is over 21 years of age, he may register as a 
resident student only upon a showing that he has been domi- 



ADMISSION 27 



cilcd in Georgia for at least tweK r months prior to the registra- 
tion date. 

Any period of time during wiiieh a person is enrolled as a 
student in any educational institution in Georgia may not be 
counted as a part of the twelve months' domicile and residence 
herein required when it appears that the student came into 
the State and remained in the State for the primary purpose 
of attending a school or college. 

4. A full-time faculty member in an institution of the University 
System, his wife, and minor children may register for courses 
on the payment of residence fees, even though the faculty 
member has not been in residence in Georgia for a period of 
twelve months. 

5. If the parents or legal guardian of a minor change residence 
to another state following a period of residence in Georgia, 
the minor may continue to take courses for a period of twelve 
consecutive months on the payment of resident fees. After the 
expiration of the twelve months' period the student may con- 
tinue his registration only upon the payment of fees at the 
non-resident rate. 

6. Military personnel stationed in Georgia, and their dependents, 
may become eligible to enroll in institutions of the University 
System as resident students provided they file with the insti- 
tution in which they wish to enroll the following materials: 

a. A statement from the appropriate military official as to the 
applicant's "home of record"; 

b. Evidence that applicant, if over 21 years of age, is eligible 
to vote in Georgia; 

c. Evidence that applicant, if under 21 years of age, is the 
child of parents who are eligible to vote in Georgia; 

d. Evidence that applicant, or his parents filed an income 
tax return in Georgia during the preceding year; 

e. Other evidence showing that a legal domicile has been 
established in Georgia. 

7. All aliens shall be classified as non-resident students; pro- 
vided, however, that an alien who is living in this country 
under a visa permitting permanent residence or who has filed 
with the proper federal immigration authorities a Declaration 
of Intention to become a citizen of the United States shall have 
the same privilege of qualifying for resident status for fee 
purposes as has a citizen of the United States. 

8. Teachers in the public schools of Georgia and their depend- 
ents may enroll as students in University System institutions 
on payment of resident fees, when it appears that such teachers 
have resided in Georgia for nine months, that they were en- 



28 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

gaged in teaching during this nine months' period, and that 
they have been employed to teach in Georgia during the en- 
suing school year. 
9. In the event that a woman who is a resident of Georgia and 
who is a student in an institution of ihe University System 
marries a non-resident of the State, the woman will continue 
to be eligible to attend the institution on payment of resident 
fees, provided that her enrollment is continuous. 
10. If a woman who is not a resident of Georgia marries a man 
who is a resident of Georgia, the woman will not be eligible 
to register as a resident student in a University System insti- 
tution until she has been domiciled in the State of Georgia for 
a period of twelve months immediately preceding the date 
of registration. 



FEES 29 

FEES 

Application Fee 

The Application Fee of $10.00 is paid by all students at the 
time of initial application for admission to Armstrong State College. 
The acceptance of the Application Fee does not constitute acceptance 
of student. This fee is not refundable. 



Matriculation Fee 

The Matriculation Fee for students registering for the normal 
course load of fifteen hours is $85.00. Students carrying less than 12 
credit hours in a quarter will pay at the rate of $7.00 per quarter 
hour in Matriculation Fee. 



Out of State Tuition 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $110.00 per quarter 
in addition to all regular fees. Students carrying less than 12 credit 
hours in a quarter who are not legal residents of the State of Georgia 
will pay at the rate of $9.00 per quarter hour Out-of-State Fee in 
addition to all regular fees. 



Student Activity Fee 

There will be a Student Activity Fee of $10.00 per quarter for 
students registering for a course load of ten or more quarter hours. 
Students carrying less than ten credit hours in a quarter will pay at 
the rate of $1.00 per quarter hour. This fee is not refundable. 



Late Registration Fee 

In the Summer Session a late registration fee of $4.00 will be 
charged to students registering on the first day of class and a fee of 
$5.00 will be charged for registrations completed on the last day to 
register for credit. 

In the Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters a late registration fee 
of $3.00 will be charged to students registering on the date listed in 
the catalog as the date on which classes begin. A fee of $4.00 will be 
charged for registrations completed on the day following the date on 
which classes begin. A fee of $5.00 will be charged for registrations 
completed on the date listed in the catalog as the "last day to register 
for credit." 



30 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Change of Schedule Fee 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the changing of a student's schedule 
after the registration cards have been processed. No charge is made 
if the change is initiated by the College. This fee is not refundable. 

Graduation Fee 

A Graduation Fee for four-year programs of $10.00 will be 
collected from each candidate to cover all expenses including the | 
rental of cap and gown and the cost of the diploma. The fee for 
Certificate for Associate in Arts Degree is $3.50. 

Transcript Fee 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college 
work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 each. 

Music Fees 

Students enrolled in Applied Music Courses will be required to 
pay a special fee. The fees are indicated in the description of courses 
found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Make-up Test Fee 

For cause, a student may arrange with an instructor to make 
up an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to 
make up the announced test must be made within one week after the 
student returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the making up of any announced 
quiz and a fee of $5.00 for a make-up final examination and labora- 
tory examinations, except as shown below. The total charges to any 
one student for a final make-up examination in a given subject shall 
not exceed $5.00. All fees will be paid to the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final 
examinations will not be charged are as follows: The student was 
absent (1) on official college business; (2) due to illness; (3) because 
of death in the family; or (4) in observing religious holidays. 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from paying the 
fee must be presented in writing to the instructor. 



Short Courses 

Fees are announced for each course when the course is an- 
nounced. No refund can be made for withdrawal from a course. 



i 



$ 85.00 
10.00 


$ 95.00 
110.00 


$205.00 
7.00 
1.00 



FEES 31 

Suiiiniai y of Fees 

Matriculation, per quarter 
Student Acti\ity, per quarter 

1 OTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS 

Out of State Tuition, per quarter 

TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS 
Matriculation, Part-time Students, per quarter hour 
Student Activity Fee, Part-time Students, per quarter hour 
Non-Resident Tuition, Part-time Students, per quarter 

hour (in addition to Matriculation Fee) 9.00 

Privilege Fees 

Application Fee 

Late Resristration — Maximum 

Special Examinations 

Final Examinations 

Graduation in four-year programs 
Associate in Arts Certificate . . 
Transcript, first one free, each additional 
Change of Schedule 

Refunds 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon written application for 
withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to students dropping 
a course. Students who formally withdraw during one week following 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 80% of 
the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw dur- 
ing the period between one and two weeks after the scheduled regis- 
tration date are entitled to a refund of 60% of the fees paid for that 
quarter. Students who formally withdraw between two and three 
weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund 
of 40% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally 
withdraw during the period between three and four weeks after the 
scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 20% of the 
fees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after a period of 
four weeks has elapsed from the scheduled registration date will be 
entitled to no refund of any part of the fees paid for that quarter. 

Fees and Charges are Subject to Change at the End of any Quarter 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 



$ 10.00 


5.00 


2.00 


5.00 


10.00 


3.50 


1.00 


2.00 



32 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquency has been removed. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full at the time of regis- 
tration. 

If a check is not paid on presentation to the bank on which it is 
drawn, the student's registration will be cancelled and the student may 
re-register only on payment of a $5.00 service charge. 



I 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Honor System 

'I lie Honor System at Armstrong State Collcgr provides all mem- 
bers of the student body with an opportunity to participate in self 
government. The accompanying responsibilities arc outlined below. 

The Honor System, written by a joint committee of faculty and 
students, received an overwhelming endorsement by both faculty and 
students during the Winter Quarter, 1965. 

The ordinances of the Honor System are as follows: 

I. All students must agree to abide by the rules and regula- 
tions of the Honor System. A student will not be accepted at Arm- 
strong State College unless he signs the following statement at the 
time of his first registration: 

"I have read the regulations governing the Honor System at Arm- 
strong State College, and I understand that as a student at Armstrong, 
I must comply with all of these requirements." 

This statement and all rules and regulations governing the Honor 
System will be printed in the official bulletin and the Student Hand- 
book. The Statement will also be printed on the application form for 
admission to be signed by the student before admission to the college. 

It will be the responsibility of the Honor Council to conduct an 
extensive orientation program at the beginning of each quarter for all 
newly entering students to explain fully the requirements of the Honor 
System and to allow full discussion of these regulations. 

n. The following will be considered violations of the Honor 
Code: 

(1) Academic dishonesty of any kind (giving or receiving any 
unauthorized help on any assignment, test or paper. At the 
beginning of each quarter it shall be the responsibility of 
each teacher to make clear what shall be considered unau- 
thorized help in his course). 

(2) Stealing only when related to cheating. 

(3) Lying before the Honor Council. 

(4) Failure to report a known offense. 

(Lying or stealing in any other cases will be considered 
disciplinary, not Honor, matters.) 

III. Ways of reporting a violation of the Honor Code: 

(1) Self-reporting: A student who has broken the Honor Code 
should report himself to a member of the Honor Council. 

(2) Anyone (faculty member or student) who is aware of a 
violation of the Honor Code must report the matter. This 
may be done in one of two ways: 



34 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



a) He may tell the person thought to be guilty to report 
himself to a member of the Honor Council no later than 
the end of the next school clay. After this designated 
time the person who is aware of the violation must in- 
form a member of the Honor Council so that the Honor 
Council may contact the accused person if he has not 
already reported himself. 

b) He may report the suspected violation directly to a 
member of the Honor Council without informing the 
accused. 

IV. The Honor Council will be composed of eleven students: 

( 1 ) A president, who must be a member of the senior class, to 
be elected by the entire student body. 

(2) A vice-president, a senior, elected as above. 

(3) A secretary, who must be a junior, elected as above. 

(4) Two representatives each from the freshman, sophomore, 
junior, and senior classes, elected by the members of their 
respective classes. 

The election of officers will be held in the Spring Quarter. The 
election of class representatives will be held in the Fall Quarter. Dur- 
ing Summer School, any member of the previous year's Honor Council 
who is attending^ summer classes will continue on the Honor Council 
for the summer. These along with the three officers elected in the 
previous Spring Quarter will appoint other students in Summer School 
to fill the remaining vacancies. Any officer not present in the Summer 
School will be temporarily replaced by appointment of the Summer 
School Honor Council. 

Qualifications for membership — All officers and representatives 
(except freshmen) must have an overall average of "C" or better for 
all work at Armstrong. Freshmen representatives must have an over- 
all average of "C" or better from high school work. 

Any student not in good standing with the college in academic 
or disciplinary matters is ineligible to ser\e on the Honor Council. 

Any member of the Honor Council who falls below these require- 
ments during his term of office will be replaced by his next runner-up 
from the previous election. 

The Honor Council will be responsible for its own bylaws. 

V. Until there are four classes at Armstrong, the following 
students will compose the Honor Council: 

For 1964-65 and 1965-66 school years: 

The president and vice-president must be upper classmen, 
elected bv the entire student bodv. 






REGULATIONS 35 



The srcretary must be a freshman, elected by the entire 
student body. 

'IIktc will be four representatives from ea( h of the two 
classes elected by their respective classes. 

For 1966-67 school year: 

I'he president and vice-president must be juniors, elected by 
the entire student body. 

The secretary must be a sophomore, elected by the entire 
student body. 

There will be two junior, three sophomore, and three fresh- 
man representatives, elected by each respective class. 

VI. Honor Council procedure for examining a reported viola- 
tion: 

(1) It is recommended that an Honor Council meeting be called 
by the president to examine a reported violation as soon as 
possible after such a report. 

(2) At the meeting the Honor Council will hear the accusation, 
the testimony of any witnesses, and any defense the accused 
may wish to present. 

(3) The accused will have the right to hear all witnesses and all 
evidence brought before the Honor Council. 

(4) The accused will be considered innocent until proved guilty. 

(5) Nine members of the Honor Council will constitute a 
quorum. 

(6) The secretary will keep minutes of all meetings and all of- 
ficial testimony will be tape recorded. 

(7) A vote of two-thirds majority of the members of the Honor 
Council present and voting will be necessary for the con- 
viction of the accused. 

(8) The vote will be taken by secret ballot. 

VII. If the accused is found innocent by vote of the Honor 
Council, the case will be closed; and all records pertaining to this case 
will be destroyed; and no further action will be taken. 

If a person is found guilty, the Honor Council will recommend 
to the President of Armstrong State College: 

(1) Suspension from school for any number of quarters (the 
minimum suspension will be for the remainder of the quarter 
in which the violation occurs). 

(2) Expulsion from school. 



36 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

All decisions of the Honor Council will be made as recommenda- 
tions to the President of Armstrong State College, who will decide on 
the action to be taken. After the President of the College has decided 
on his course of action, he will inform the accused person of this 
decision in writing, and the President will post an official notice on 
the bulletin boards announcing his action without mentioning the 
name of the accused. 

VIIL Although the College feels that the above two recommen- 
dations arc appropriate for academic dishonesty, it also recognizes 
that unique circumstances may arise. For such cases a series of appeals 
is open to the convicted student. He may appeal either the conviction 
or the punishment or both in the following ways: 

( 1 ) To the President of Armstrong State College in a letter. 

(2) The President's decision may be appealed to the Chancellor 
of the University System of Georgia in a letter. 

(3) The Chancellor's decision may be appealed to the Board of 
Regents of the University System of Georgia in a letter. 

IX. Each student will be required to write on ever\' written 
assignment, test, or paper a pledge that he has neither given nor 
received any unauthorized help on this work. This may be done by 
writing the word "Pledged" followed by the student's signature. 

X. A revision of the Honor System will require a majority vote 
of the faculty and of the student body. 



Academic Advisement ] 

Every student who enters Armstrong State College indicates at 
the time he applies for admission what major program he hopes to 
follow toward a degree, either at Armstrong or at another college. 

If the student has not yet decided upon a choice for his major 
program, he may attend several advising sessions during the orienta- 
tion period. In fact, it is not necessary in many major programs for 
the Bachelor of Arts degree to make a clear choice until the end of the 
sophomore year. If a student waits one or two years to choose a 
major program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree, he will 
probably find that he must take additional courses to meet gradua- 
tion requirements. For a student attempting to choose a major field 
during his first two years the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs 
offers counselling helps, and faculty members are happy to discuss 
aspects of their field. 

During Orientation Week and before registration all new enter- 
ing students, both freshmen and transfer students, will meet with the 



REGULATIONS 37 



faculty adviser for the major program they have indicated. The ad- 
\ iscr will guide them at this time in mapping out a schedule for the 
first two years. The student is then responsible for taking the courses 
required for his program, as outlined in the college Bulletin, in the 
proper sequence, during his freshman and sophomore years. If the 
student has questions concerning the courses required or the proper 
scheduling of them during these first two years, he should see the 
facultN' ad\iser assigned by his major department to confer with stu- 
dents during the pre-advisement period scheduled in the college calen- 
dar. Since the student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements 
of his program, he does not need the written approval of a faculty 
adviser in order to register for courses each quarter.''^ 

During the third quarter of his sophomore year, a student hoping 
to pursue a four-year major program should take to the faculty ad- 
viser assigned by his major department a list of the courses he has 
completed with grades. Having satisfactorily completed the require- 
ments for the first two years of his major program, he will then be 
admitted formally to the third year of the major program and guided 
by the departmental adviser in mapping out his curriculum for the 
last two years. During the six quarters of his junior and senior years 
the student must have his course selection approved in writing by the 
departmental adviser each quarter before registration. The proper 
time for this is during the pre-advisement period listed in the college 
calendar. During these last two years, the adviser will keep a record 
of the courses the student takes and the grades he makes, and during 
the Fall Quarter of the senior year, the adviser \vi\\ signify to the 
Registrar whether the student has completed all requirements for 
graduation in that major program up to that time, and is therefore 
recommended for graduation. 

Relating to Degree Requirements 

1. Each student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements of 
the degree program which he has chosen, in accordance with 
the regulations of the college catalogue. 

2. Exceptions to course requirements for a degree are permitted 
only by the written approval of the Dean of the College upon 
the recommendation of the department head. 

3. A student will graduate under any catalogue in effect from 
his time of entrance to the college. However, after an absence 
from Armstrong State College of two or more consecutive 
years, a student must meet the requirements of a catalogue 
in effect after his return. 



•However, a student must be extremely careful to observe all regulations for admission to 
courses, such as the requirement of other prerequisite courses, sometimes with a specified 
grade. Credit for a course is invalid unless all its prerequisite requirements are observed. 



38 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

4. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a 
degree may consist of courses taken by correspondence or ex- 
tension. No correspondence courses may be used to meet the 
requirements in the major field or related fields for the Bache- 
lor's degree or for English composition or foreign language. 
No correspondence courses may be taken while a student is 
enrolled. 

5. Examination on the history and Constitution of the United 
States and of the State of Georgia is required of all persons 
receiving a degree from this college, except those having had 
courses dealing with these subjects. The Department of His- 
tory will post a list of courses satisfying the requirement. It 
will offer an examination satisfying the requirement in the 
fall and spring quarters. (See the College Calendar.) 

6. For a Bachelor's degree, a student must earn at Armstrong 
State College the last 45 quarter hours of credit before gradu- 
ation in quarter hour credits numbered 200 or above. At 
least half the courses required in the major field must be 
taken at Armstrong State College. 

7. Before a degree will be conferred upon a student by Arm- 
strong State College, all fees must have been paid, and the 
Registrar must have been notified in writing at least by the 
end of the preceding Fall Quarter of his intention to gradu- 
ate. A candidate for a degree, unless excused in writing by the 
President, Dean of the College, or Dean of Student Affairs, 
must attend the graduation exercises at which a degree is to be 
conferred upon him. 

Course and Study Load 

The normal course load for full-time students is 15 quarter hours 
(and a course in physical education during the freshman and sopho- 
more years). An average student should devote at least thirty hours 
each week, in addition, to course preparation. 

The maximum course load for a student who works full-time is 
1 1 quarter hours. A working student should plan about ten hours 
preparation for each 5 quarter hour course. 

Permission to enroll for more than 17 quarter hours will be 
granted by the Registrar to a student 

a) with an a\erage grade of "B" for the preceding quarter, 
or 

b) in an engineering program, or 

c) requiring an extra course in one of the two quarters 
prior to graduation. 



REGULATIONS 39 



No student will bi- allow ttl lo icgistCM" for iiioir than 21 (luailci 
hours in any one cjuai tcr. 

I' xt options to thfsr liniilations may be made only by the Dean of 
the College. 

E\ery student enrolled for 15 quarter hours or more must take 
at least one aeadcmie eourse (or a science laboratory section) in the 
afternoon. (If a student plans to work part-time, he should arrange 
his working hours after he registers for courses.) 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt by the faculty that students in college should be held 
accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, grade reports, warnings 
of deficient scholarship and all such notices are not sent to parents 
or guardians by the Registrar except on request. Instead the students 
themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact their 
advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report cards are issued 
at the end of each quarter. Reports of unsatisfactory grades are issued 
in the middle of each quarter. Each student has access to an adviser; 
in addition, the Registrar and all instructors are available to help any 
student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

Honor Points 
4.5 
4 

3.5 
3 

2.5 
2 

1.5 
1 




Numerical Span 


A + 


95- 


100 


A 


90- 


94 


B + 


85- 


89 


B 


80- 


84 


c+ 


75- 


79 


G 


70- 


74 


D + 


65- 


69 


D 


60- 


64 


F 


Below 60 


I 


Incomplete 


W 


Withdrew with no grade 


WF 


Withdrew failing 


NC 


No 


credit 



A student who receives an "I" (incomplete grade) should consult 
I his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of the 
) course. An "I" grade which has not been removed by the middle of 
n the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F". 



40 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Honors 

Dean's List: Students enrolled for at least five quarter hours of 
course work who earn an honor point average of at least 3.5 will be 
placed on the Dean's List, which is published quarterly. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point 
average of 3.2 through 3.5 will be graduated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor 
point average of 3.6 through 3.9 will be graduated magna cum laude. 

Summa Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor 
point average of 4.0 through 4.5 will be graduated summa cum laude. 

Attendance 

The control of student attendance at class meetings and the effect 
of a student's attendance on his grades in a course is left entirely to 
the discretion of the instructor. 

A student is responsible for knowing everything that is announced, 
discussed, or lectured upon in class as well as for mastering all as- 
signed reading; he is also responsible for turning in on time all as- 
signments and tests, including recitation and unannounced quizzes. 
The best way to meet these responsibilities is to attend classes regu- 
larly. An instructor may drop a student from any class with a grade 
of "WF" if he thinks that excessive absence prevents that student 
from satisfactorily fulfilling his responsibilities. If such excessive ab- 
sence is the result of prolonged illness, death in the family, college 
business, or religious holidays the withdrawal grade will be either ''\V" 
or ''WF" depending on the student's status at the time he was dropped. 
Each instructor will be responsible for informing his classes on their 
meeting what constitutes excessive absence in the particular class. 
Each student is responsible for knowing the attendance regulation in 
his class and for complying with it. 

Physical Education Program 

All students who are enrolled for ten quarter hours or more on 
the day schedule and who are candidates for degrees are required to 
take six physical education courses, one in each quarter of the fresh- 
man and sophomore years, with the sequence of 111, 112, 113 in the 
freshman year. A student graduating with an A. A. degree in less than 
six quarters must take one course in each quarter of his freshman and 
so})homore years. 

The department requires all students to make up excused ab- 
sences ; unexcused absences lower the final grade. 

Physical education is not required of anyone beyond the age of 
25, or of anyone enrolled primarily in evening classes. 



REGULATIONS 41 



Academic Probation and Dismissal 

A student failiiii; to maintain the following grade jjoint average 
on all work attempted at Armstrong State College will be placed on 
academic probation ior two cjiiarters. 

Quarter Hours Grade Point Average 

45 1.6 

90 1.8 

135 1.9 

180 2.0 

A student who is placed on academic probation while he is en- 
rolled as a full-time student (one who enrolls for 12 or more quarter 
hours) must register for and successfully complete 10 or more quarter 
hours of academic work, for at least the next two quarters in which 
he is enrolled, with a 2.0 gradepoint average or better to be eligible 
to remain in school. 

A student who is placed on academic probation while enrolled 
as a part-time student (one who enrolls for less than 12 quarter 
hours) must register for and successfully complete at least 5 quarter 
hours of academic work for at least the next two successive quarters 
in which he is enrolled, with a gradepoint average of 2.0 or better 
to be eligible to remain in school. 

Failure to meet the above requirements for probation will result 
in the dismissal of the student for two quarters. 

A probationary student, if allowed to remain in school, shall 
remain on probation until his cumulative gradepoint average reaches 
or exceeds the gradepoint average indicated above as minimal for 
the appropriate year. 

A full-time student (one who enrolls for 12 or more quarter 
hours) who fails to pass at least one course other than physical edu- 
cation in any quarter will be dismissed from the college for two 
quarters. A part-time student (one who enrolls for less then 12 
quarter hours) who fails to pass at least one course other than physi- 
cal education in two successive quarters will be dismissed from the 
college for two quarters. A grade of "I" (incomplete) will be con- 
sidered an "F" until it is removed. 

A student re-entering the college after academic dismissal will 
be placed on academic probation for two successive quarters. 

A student dismissed for academic reasons may appeal his dismissal 
to the Committee on Academic Standing. Such appeals must be made 
in writing to the Committee (addressed to the Secretary), should 
state the nature of all extenuating circumstances relating to his 
academic deficiency, and must be received by the Committee by the 
time of its announced meeting. 



42 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

A third dismissal for failure to meet the academic standards of 
the college shall in all cases be final. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal from College presented to the Registrar 
in writing, is a pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re- 
entrance into this institution. Any student planning to withdraw should 
immediately make such an intention known to the Registrar in 
writing. This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 
A refund will be considered only from date of notice. 

A student should formally withdraw from any class by securing 
the permission of the Dean of Student Affairs and of his instructor. 
This written approval should be filed in the Registrar's office. 

If a student withdraws from a course not more than 7 academic 
days after the first day of classes, no record of this course will be 
entered on his transcript. A student who withdraws from a course 
eight academic days or more after the first day of classes will receive 
a grade of "W" or "WF" depending upon his status at the time of 
the withdrawal. 

A student on probation who withdraws from a course will be 
considered to have violated the probation, whether or not he was 
passing at the time of withdrawal. 

Auditing 

A regular student wishing to "audit" a course without receiving 
credit must obtain the written permission of the instructor before he 
registers for the course. (Policy for some courses forbids "auditing") 
An "auditor" cannot change to regular credit status after the first 
week of class. A student may not change from credit status to audit 
status after the first seven class meetings. A student who registers 
for a course as an "auditor" receives no credit, "N. C", on his 
transcript. Regular schedules of fees apply to auditors. 



STUDENT SERVICES 
and ACTIVITIES 

The Division of Student Affairs, administered by the Dean of 
Student Affairs, is responsible for all student services and activities. 
In addition to formal classroom instruction, the College recognizes 
the need for providing programs and services which contribute to a 
well-rounded college experience. Such programs are administered by 
the Division of Student Affairs through the following individuals: 
Registrar and Admissions Officer, Counselors, Director of Financial 
Aids, Director of Student Activities, Alumni Secretary, and the 
campus Nurse. 

Academic Advisement 

Before and during registration, members of the faculty are avail- 
able to students for assistance in the selection of course work and 
in the scheduling of classes. Information concerning degree require- 
ments and college regulations is provided and topics of general 
academic interest may be discussed. 

By the end of the sophomore year, students are required to 
designate a major field and are assigned to a faculty adviser in that 
area. The faculty adviser then works closely with the student in 
planning a program leading to the successful completion of degree 
requirements. 

Counseling Services 

The Faculty and Administration of Armstrong State College 
recognize that students are frequently confronted with difficult and 
important decisions. In some instances students need the competent 
assistance of professional persons who have been trained to deal with 
the specific problems of college students. 

In light of these needs, qualified Testing and Guidance Counselors 
are located in the Office of Student Personnel to help students in 
(1) clarifying educational and vocational objectives, (2) developing 
effective study skills and habits, and (3) dealing with problems of 
social and emotional significance. 

' Orientation 

Orientation for freshmen is scheduled prior to registration for 
the fall quarter. The program is designed to assist students in making 
the transition from high school to college and to acquaint them 



44 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

with school policies, traditions, and procedures. The Orientation 
Program includes an introduction to administrative officials and 
faculty; a presentation of the purposes and academic progress of 
Armstrong State College; indoctrination concerning the college's 
regulations and requirements; an introduction to student leaders and 
student activities; a survey of the facilities of the school; an opportunity 
for the student to plan a program with counselors; and social events. 
Attendance is required. 

Financial Aids 

A college education for qualified students, regardless of their 
economic circumstances, is the guiding principal behind Armstrong 
State College's program of student financial aid. Through an ex- 
panding program of financial aid which offers scholarships, short- 
term loans, and student employment. Armstrong State College tries 
to make it possible for all qualified students with limited resources 
to attend college. 

In selecting a financial-aid recipient, special consideration is 
given to the applicant's record of achievement and promise of success. 
Gift scholarships usually specify high academic standards as an eligi- 
bility requirement: otherwise full-time students in good standing who 
progress normally toward their degree-goal are eligible for financial 
aid. 

Armstrong State College uses the College Scholarship Senices 
which evaluates the Parents' Confidential Statement. Freshmen may 
secure this form from the local high school counselor, from the Stu- 
dent Personnel Office of the College, or from the College Scholarship 
Service. P.O. Box 176. Princeton. New Jersey. Applications which do 
not include this financial data are incomplete and cannot be con- 
sidered. Applications for scholarships must be filed before May 14 
(exception — April 30 is the deadline for Regents Scholarships). Final 
action cannot be taken until the applicants have been accepted for 
admission to the college: thus, early application is urged. 

Scholarships 

Alpha Tau Beta 

Armstrong State College Alimini Association m 

Chatham County Teachers' Association t 

Chatham Education Association Scholarship 

Edward McGuire Gordon Memorial Scholarship 

Robert \V. Groves Scholarships 

Jenkins Scholarships 



SCHOLARSHIPS 45 



Junior Chamber of Commerce Scholarship 

Arthur Lucas Memorial Scholarships 

Pihn Club of Savannah 

Phnnrite 

Port City Lions Club 

Rebel Chapter, American Business Women's Club 

Savannah Gas Company 

Savannah Pharmaceutical Association 

Harry G. Strachan, HI, Memorial Scholarship 

Strachan Shipping Company 

Regents' Scholarships 

Another soiuxe of scholarship aid for students who are residents 
of the State of Georgia is the Regents' Scholarship. These scholarships, 
varying from $250 to $1,000, are awarded to superior students who 
are in need of financial assistance to attend college. To be eligible for 
a Regents' Scholarship a student must have grades or predicted grades 
that place him in the upper 25% of his class. Recipients of Regents' 
Scholarships are expected, upon completion of their program of study, 
to reside in the State of Georgia and work one year for each $1,000 
of scholarship aid received. 

Further information on these scholarships and application forms 
may be obtained from the Student Personnel Office at the College. 
The deadline for applying for the Regents' Scholarships is April 30. 

Financial Aid Application Procedure 
A financial applicant should take the following steps: 

1. File Armstrong State College Financial Aid Application Form 
with Director of Financial Aid, Student Personnel Office by May 
14 for fall quarter. 

2. Apply for admission to Armstrong State College through the 
regular Admissions Office. 

3. Take the College Entrance Examination Boards in December or 
January and have SAT scores sent to Armstrong State College. 

4. Have parents (or guardian) complete and submit the Parents' 
Confidential Statement to College Scholarship Service, Box 176, 
Princeton, New Jersey, requesting that the Need Analysis be sent 
to Armstrong State College. 

When the Director of Financial Aid has received all items listed 
above, then and only then, will consideration be given to the student's 
request. 



46 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Other Sources of Financial Aid to 

Armstrong State College 

Short-term and long-term loans are available at low interest rates 
through the Kiwanis and Reusing Loan Funds. 

Clinton Lodge No. 54, F. & A.M. Scholarship — This scholarship 
is for graduates of the regular high school of the Public School System 
of Chatham County. Grants will be awarded to students whose family 
income is $7,500 or less; who stand in the top 30^f of their class; 
who have a combined SAT score of 900, and who are of good 
character. Return to: Education Committee, Clinton Lodge No. 54, 
F. & A.M., P.O. Box 992, Savannah, Georgia, by June 1. 

Solomon's Lodge No. 1 , F. & A.M. Scholarship— T-wo scholar- 
ships for $240 each to be awarded to a graduate of a tax-supported 
high school. Apply to: Committee on Scholarship Awards, Solomon's 
Lodge No. 1, F. & A.M., P.O. Box 1711, Savannah, Georgia. 

Savannah Chapter, National Secretaries Association — One scholar- 
ship covering tuition, fees and expenses, for a female student majoring 
in secretarial science. Apply to: High School Counselor or typing 
teacher. 

William F. Cooper Education Fund — Provides scholarships to 
female students in all fields except law, theolog)', and medicine (nurs- 
ing and medical technology are acceptable). Apply to: Trust De- 
partment, Savannah Bank & Trust Company, between April 1 and 
May 31. 

State Teachers' Scholarships — Provide scholarship funds for stu- 
dents who will enter the field of teaching in the State of Georgia. 
Apply to: Georgia State Teachers' Scholarship Program, State De- 
partment of Education. Room 247. State Office Building, Atlanta, 
Georgia 30303. 

The State Scholarship Commission — Provides scholarships for 
students who cannot otherwise finance the cost of a program of 
study in dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, social w'ork, paramedical fields 
and other educational and professional fields of study as defined and 
approved by the Commission. 

Ty Cobb Education Foundation Scholarship — Provides scholar- 
ship aid for residents of the State of Georgia who have completed 
their freshman year in college. Apply to: Ty Cobb Educational 
Foundation Scholarships, Room 454, 244 Washington Street, S.W., 
Atlanta, Georgia 30303. 

Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund — Provides loans at reason- 
able interest rates to students in need of such aid to attend college. 
Apply to: Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund, P.O. Box 1238, 
Columbus, Georgia. 



I 



SCHOLARSHIPS 47 



Saranriah Phannaceutical Association Scholarship — One scholar- 
ship for $200 for a freshman student niajorincj in pre-pharinacy to 
attend Armstrong College (or the University of Georgia). Apply to: 
Mr. Thomas C. Crumbley, Chairman, Scholarship Committee, Savan- 
nah Pharmaceutical Association, c/o Crumbley's Pharmacy, 1502 
Waters Avenue, Savannah, Georgia. 

Chatham Artillery Scholarships — A number of scholarships for 
$250 each to members of the Chatham Artillery attending college full 
time. Apply to the Chatham Artillery. 

State Department of Vocational Rehabilitation — Students who 
have had a physical or emotional handicap, and have been treated 
successfully, and are considered acceptable for vocational rehabilita- 
tion, may receive financial assistance to attend college through the 
State Department of Vocational Rehabilitation. Apply to: 35 Aber- 
corn Street, Savannah, Georgia. 

It is anticipated that Educational Opportunity Grants established 
through the Higher Education Act of 1965 will provide gift assistance 
ranging from $200 to $800 for certain qualified first year students. 

The Georgia Higher Education Assistance Corporation has a 
program of state guaranteed loans for Georgia residents in which the 
student borrows from his local bank for school expenses to be paid 
back after he leaves school. 

Student Assistantships 

A limited amount of financial aid is available to students through 
the Work-Study Program and the College Student Assistantship Pro- 
gram. Through these programs a number of part-time, on campus, 
jobs are made available to students who need financial assistance. 
Interested individuals should contact the Student Personnel Office 
prior to the beginning of each quarter. 

The Student Personnel Office also maintains a file of available 
part-time jobs in the community and is glad to assist students, when- 
ever practicable, in locating outside work. 

Conduct 

Every student who enrolls in a course at Armstrong State College 
commits himself, by the act of enrolling, to full compliance with the 
rules and regulations of the Honor System. This system was written 
by a joint student-faculty committee, at the request of the students, 
and was adopted by an overwhelming vote of the student body and 
of the faculty in 1965. It is a fundamental part of our academic 
community's way of life. The Honor System is given under "Academic 
Regulations" in this Bulletin and in the Student Handbook. 



48 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Compliance with the regulations of the faculty and the Regents 
of the University System and Georgia is assumed. Gambling, hazing, 
and the use on the campus of intoxicating beverages are prohibited. 

Student Activities and Organizations 

In addition to an outstanding academic program, Armstrong 
State College offers a complete schedule of extra-curricular student 
activities designed to contribute to the development of the student 
and assist him in becoming an active and productive member of the 
community in which he lives. 

Student organizations at Armstrong State College reflect the 
natural variety of interests found in a diversified student body. In- 
dividuals who seek a well-rounded education will avail themselves of 
the varied opportunities afforded through the college program of 
student activities. 



Student Government 



The Student Government Association is the official governing 
body of the students at Armstrong State College. It assists in formula- 
ting a program of student services and activities, and it strives to 
express the will of the majority of students and to provide experience 
in democratic living. 

All students are automatically members of the Student Govern- 
ment Association and entitled to a vote in matters of concern to 
students. Qualified students may seek positions of leadership in the 
Student Government Association by running for office during the 
spring quarter. 

Student Publications 

The two official student publications on campus are the "Ink- 
well", the college newspaper, and the "Geechee," the college annual. 
Both publications are produced entirely by students under the super- 
vision of qualified faculty members. Financed in part by the Student 
Activity Fund, these publications provide opportunities in creative 
writing, reporting, and design. 

Athletics 



Armstrong State College participates in inter-collegiatc athletic 
competition in basketball, baseball, and golf. Additional athletic 
opportunities are provided through the Intramural Program in the 
areas of basketball, softball, swimming, and volleyball. 



CLUBS 49 



Clubs and Organizations 

A variety of clubs and organizations representing varied interests 
And activities are available to students at Armstrong State College, 
riiese include academic interest clubs, dance and social or<];anizations, 
hobby groups, religious groups, and others. The organized clubs on 
campus are listed below. In addition to these, many new groups are 
currently seeking recognition. 

Cheerleaders Wesley Foundation 

Debate Team Baptist Student Union 

English Club Glee Club 

Future Secretaries B'nai B'rith 

Geechee Canterbury Club 

Inkwell Westminister Fellowship 

Masquers A P O 



Newman Club 



Cultural Opportunities 

Armstrong State College provides a variety of cultural op- 
portunities for its students. Lectures by eminent scholars in the various 
academic fields and musical concerts by outstanding artists are an 
integral part of the program in general education. Student dramatic 
productions under professional direction and the student choral society 
have created distinguished traditions for these groups. The college 
purchases a large block of tickets for students to all concerts of the 
Savannah Symphony Orchestra. 



Health 

Beginning July 1, 1966, a registered nurse will be on duty during 
the school hours. Students in need of her serv^ices should report to 
the Infirmary. A physical examination is required of each new student. 



Alumni Office 

The prime purpose of the Alumni Office is to keep former 
students informed about the college, and to help them keep in touch 
with each other. Any person who at any time was matriculated as a 
regular student is eligible for membership in the Alumni Association, 
and upon payment of his dues will receive the quarterly newsletter, 
"The Geechee Gazette," and may vote and hold office in the As- 
sociation. The Alumni Office assists in arranging class reunions, 
board meetings, and other functions. 



50 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Housing 

At the present time no dormitories are provided at Armstrong 
State College. Upon request, out-of-town students who desire to 
attend the College may receive from the Student Personnel Office 
a list of approved housing in the local community. The College does 
not pro\ide supervision for such housing. 






CURRICULA and 
COURSE OFFERINGS 

All degrees awarded by Armstrong State College include these 
minimum requirements : 

Quarter Hours 

English Composition 10 

Literature of the Western World 10 

History of Ci\ilization 10 

Mathematics 10 

Science 10 

Physical Education 6 

I. Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major 
in English, history or music, or Bachelor of Science with a major in 
biology, chemistry or mathematics the following requirements must be 
completed in accordance with the regulations stated in this bulletin. 
Recjuirements for each major program are described under the ap- 
propriate department. 

Requirements for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
of Science. 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Qtr. Hrs. 
(Core Curriculum) 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. One Foreign Language 101, 102, 103(') 15 

3. Music, Art, or Philosophy 110 5 

4. History of Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 5 

6. Two of the following courses: 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113 
Psychology 201 
Sociology 201 

7. Mathematics 101, 102 or 105, 106(') 10 

^To meet this requirement a student need not take language courses beyond 103 if he 
demonstrates proficiency in one or more of these. A student with two units of high 
school foreign language in the 9th and 10th grades will not receive credit for 101. A 
student with two units of high school foreign language in the Uth and 12th grades will 
not receive credit for 101 and 102. A student with more than two units of high school 
foreign language may request a placement examination. 

^B.S. majors are required to take Mathematics lOK 102. 



52 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

8. One of the following sequences of two courses: 10 

Botany 121, 122 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Zoology 101, 102 



85 

IL Courses in the Major Field("^) 50-70 

(No student will be allowed to take senior division courses 
in his major field unless he has a minimum of C in all 
prerequisite courses in that field.) 

in. Courses in Related Fields(') 15-30 

IV. Physical Education 111, 1 12, 1 13 and three 200 courses 6 

V. Free Electives(') 15(or 

more to complete a minimum of 
185 quarter hours, exclusive of 
physical education) 

II. Teacher Education 

Teacher education programs for elementary and secondary 
teachers must meet the requirements both for the academic degree 
and for certification by the State Department of Education. 

Students who decide to follow either the elementary or secondaiy 
teaching program should apply at once to the Department of Edu- 
cation, preferably in the freshman year, and not later than the begin- 
ning of the junior year. The student who applies must be admitted to 
the program, usually at the end of the sophomore year, by recom- 
mendation of the Teacher Education Committee. 

A student wishing to teach in elementary school should pursue 
the desrree of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; a student 
wishing to teach in secondary school should pursue one of the major 
programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 



^For its major program a department may not require more than 60 quarter hours at all 
levels in the major field, but it may recommend up to 70 quarter hours. 



'For its major program a department will require from 15 to 30 quarter hours of specified 
courses or approved elective courses in related fields, and language courses reaching the 
degree of proficiency specified by the department. (If a course is counted as fulfilling the 
General Requirements, it will not also fulfill the requirement for "III Courses in Related 
Fields.") Total requirements for II and III may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 



'For the B.A. and B.S. degrees a minimum of 185 quarter hours, exclusive of physical 
education, is required for graduation. For all degrees the completion of 90 quarter hours 
in courses numbered 300 or above is a requirement, except in approved programs in 
mathematics, the natural sciences, and music. 



I 



CURRICULAR AND COURSE OFFERINGS 53 



degree, with the additional requimiuMits outliiicd luulcr ilic Depart- 
ment of Education. In either the elementary or secondary pro^iam 
the requirements total no more than 200 cjuarter hours of academic 
work. 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

I. General Requirements: 91 quarter hours 

1. Humanities: 30 quarter hours 
English 101, 102, 201, 202, 228 25 
Music 200, Art 200 or Philosophy 110 5 

2. Social Sciences: 30 quarter hours 

History 114, 115, 351, 352 20 

Political Science 113 5 

Geography 111 5 

3. Sciences: 25 quarter hours 
Botany 121, 122 or Zoology 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 121, 122 or Physics 211, 212 10 

Mathematics 105 5 

4. Physical Education: 6 quarter hours 
' Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

Three 200 courses 3 

II. Electives: 25 quarter Jiours 

1. Approved electives to establish added proficiency in one area 
to be known as the teaching field chosen to correspond to the 
elementary curriculum: English, social sciences, sciences, mathe- 
matics and modern foreign languages 20 

2. Approved elective in related field 5 

III. Specialized Courses: 30 quarter hours 

English 331 . 5 

Art 320 - 5 

Music 320 5 

Physical Education 320 5 

Mathematics 452 5 

Education 425 5 

IV. Professional Sequence Courses: 45 quarter hours 

Psychology 201, 301 10 

Education 103 or 303, 301, 435, 

436, 446, 447, 448 . 35 

III. Bachelor of Business Administration 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Business Admin- 
istration with a major in accounting, economics or management, the 
following requirements must be completed in accordance with the 
regulations stated in this bulletin. For major concentrations, see re- 
quirements described under Department of Business Administration. 



54 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Bachelor of Business Administration 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Business Admin- 
istration the minimum requirements in the various fields of study will 
be: 

L Humanities 

A. Freshman English 10 

B. Literature of the Western World 10 

C. Music, Art, or Philosophy 5 

25 

IL Social Sciences 

A. History of Civilization 10 

B. Principles of Economics 10 

C. Elective from History, Political Science, 

Psychology, Sociology 5 

25 

HL Natural Sciences 

A. Mathematics (101, 102, 104 or 235, 204) 20 

B. Laboratory Science (sequence) 10 

30 

IV. Business Administration 

Introductory Accounting 10 

TOTAL FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE 

(Other than Physical Education) 90 

V. Approved electives from the Humanities, the Social 30 

Sciences, Natural Sciences or Mathematics. History 351 
or 352 must be included and English 228 (Fundamentals 
of Speech) is highly recommended. At least 15 qtr. hrs. 
must be in courses numbered 200 and above. 

VI. Business Core Requirements: 30 

Business Finance 
Business Law 
Principles of Management 
Money and Banking 
Labor and Industrial Relations 
and one of the following: 
Principles of Marketing 
Public Finance 
Government and Business 



I 



CURRICULAR AND COURSE OFFERINGS 55 



VII. Major Concentration 

(see Departmental reiiuirements) 30 

VIII. Physical Education 6 

TOTAL REQUIREMENTS 191 

Bachelor of Business Administration Degree 
(Major in Business Education) 

I. Humanities 

A. Freshman English 10 

B. Literature of the Western World 10 

C. Music, Art, or Philosophy 5 

25 

II. Social Sciences 

A. History of Civilization 10 

B. Principles of Economics 10 

C. American Government 5 

25 

III. Natural Sciences 

A. Mathematics (including 204) 15 

B. Laboratory Science (sequence) 10 

25 

IV. Business Administration 

Introductory Accounting 10 

V. Approved electives from the Humanities, the Social 30 

Sciences, Natural Sciences, or Mathematics. History 351 
or 352 must be included and English 228 (Fundamentals 
of Speech) is highly recommended. At least 15 qtr. hrs. 
must be in courses numbered 200 and above. 

VI. Business Administration 20 

Four courses selected from 300 or 400 level 

Business Administration Courses 

VII. Commerce . 25 

Typing 

Shorthand 

Business Communications 

Office Practice and Procedures 



56 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

VIIL Education 103 and six other professional courses 

required for certification. 33 

IX. Physical Education 6 

Total Requirements 201 

IV. Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101-102, 201-202 20 

2. History- of the U. S 5 

3. History 114-115 10 

4. Mathematics 101-102 10 

5. Foreign Languages 

(15 qtr. hrs. or 10 qtr. hrs. plus elective) 10-15 

6. Psychology 201, Sociology 201 10 

7. Physics 211, 212 .' 10 

8. Chemistiy 128-129, 281-282, 341-342 30 

9. Zoolog)- 101-102, 325-326 _ 20 

10. Biology 351-352 10 

One course from the following: 

Entomolog\- 301 5 

Zoolog\- 357 

Zoolog)- 372 

Zoolo^' 390 

Physical Education 6 

Elective 5 



151-156 

After satisfactorily completing the required number of courses 
and hours listed above, the degree candidate must complete 12 
months in Clinical Medical Technology- at an approved hospital. 
With the completion of this work and satisfactorily passing the 
examination given by the Registiy of Medical Technologists, the 
student will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Armstrong State College cooperates with Memorial Hospital of 
Chatham County in giving a B. S. degree with a major in Sledical 
Technology. This program has been approved by the Council on 
Medical Education of the American Medical Association and by the 
Board of Schools of Medical Technology of the American Society of 
Clinical Pathologists. 

The Coordinator of this degree program is Dr. L. B. Davenport, 
Jr., Head of the Department of Biolog\'. 



CURRICULAR AND COURSE OFFERINGS 57 



V. Assoc'iaU' in Arts 

For the two-yrar degree of Associate in Arts a student must 
complete the last 45 quarter hours of course work in this proi^ram 
at Armstrong State College. I'he program is designed to provide a 
substantial liberal education as a base for upper-division specialization. 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. History 114, 115 10 

3. One of the following sequences of two courses: 10 

Botany 121, i22 
Chemistry 111, 112 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Zoology 103, 104 

4. Mathematics 101 or 105 . 5 

5. Two of the following courses: 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113 
Psychology 201 
Sociology 201 
U.S. History 351 or 352 

6. One of the following courses: . 5 

Music 

Art 

Philosophy 110 

7. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 

and three 200 courses 6 

8. Electives* 30 

96 

The Registrar will evaluate the transcripts of students who peti- 
tion for graduation in terms of the requirements for each of the 
following varieties of degree: 

1. Bachelor of Arts with a major in English 



I 



a 



*U a student plans to continue work in the future toward a Bachelor's degree, he should 
select courses that will meet the listed requirements of a Bachelor degree program. 



58 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

2. Bachelor of Arts with a major in English and requirements 

for secondary certification 

3. Bachelor of Arts with a major in History 

4. Bachelor of Arts with a major in History and requirements 

for secondary certification 

5. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music ■ 

6. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music and requirements 

for secondary certification 

7. Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology 

8. Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology and requirements 

for secondary certification 

9. Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry 

10. Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and require- 

ments for secondary certification. 

11. Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics 

12. Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics and require- 

ments for secondary certification 

13. Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

14. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Ac- 

counting 

15. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Economics 

16. Bachelor of Business Administration w^th a major in Manage- 

ment 

17. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Business 

Education 

18. Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 

19. Associate in Arts 

20. Associate in Arts in Nursing 



r I 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

Armstrong State College reseivcs the right to ( 1 ) withdraw any 
coui-se for which less than ten students register, (2) limit the enroll- 
ment in any course or class section, (3) fix the time of meeting of 
all classes and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as de- 
mand and faculty warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in languages where 
the same or similar courses have been presented for admission from 
high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed, 
for example: Zoology 103-104. 

After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture; the second, 
the number of hours of laboratory; and the third, the number of 
quarter hoius of credit the courses carries. For example: Botany 121 
—General Botany (3-4-5). 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are generally planned for the fresh- 
man level; courses nimibered 200 to 299 for the sophomore level: 
courses numbered 300 to 399 for the junior level; courses numbered 
400-499 for the senior level. 

Anthropology 

(See listing under Department of Psychology and Sociology) 

Art 

(See listing under Department of Fine Arts) 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professor Leslie B. Davenport, Jr., Head; Associate Professors Crosby 
and Thorne; Assistant Professor Ashbrook 

Departmental Requirements for the Major in Biology 

The major in biology consists of Zoology 101-102, Botany 121, 
and at least 40 quarter hours credit in biology courses (botany, zoology, 
etc.) numbered 300 or above. In addition, biology majors must com- 
plete the course sequence in organic chemistry (15 quarter hours). 
The course in General College Physics (15 quarter hours) is strongly 
recommended and should be considered essential for those who expect 
to continue the study of biology beyond the B.S. degree. 

Every student acquiring a major in biology must include in his 
program the following courses: Botany 375 or Zoology 353; Biology 
370; and Botany 380 or Zoology 390. 



60 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Course Offerings 

Biology 210— Microbiology (3-4-5). Prerequisites: 10 hours of 
biological science with laboratory and 5 hours of inorganic chemistry. 

An introduction to the study of micro-organisms with primary 
emphasis on bacteria. The morphology, life history, and public health 
importance of representative bacteria, molds, viruses, protozoa, and 
helminths are considered. This course is intended primarily for nursing 
students. 

Biology 351 — Introductory Microbiology, I. (3-4-5). Prerequi- 
sites: 10 hours of biological science, 5 hours of physical science (with 
lab) and 5 hours of organic chemistry. 

A survey of micro-organisms with special emphasis on bacteria 
and their relationship to man. 

Biology 352 — Introductory Microbiology, II. (3-4-5). Prerequi- 
site: Biology 351. 

Morphology, Physiology, taxonomy, ecology, isolation, and culture 
of viruses, rickettsiae, bacteria, yeasts, lower "molds", and pathogenic 
protozoa. 

Biology 358 — Histological Technique. (0-10-5). Prerequisites: 
Botany 121-122 or Zoology 325-326. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, 
staining, and mounting plant and animal materials for study. 

Biology 370 — Genetics (3-4-5). Prerequisites: Botany 122 or 
Zoology 326. 

An introduction to the principles of biological inheritance. 

Biology 380 — General Ecology (3-4-5). Prerequisites: Two 
upper division courses in biology (botany or zoology) 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the 
welfare of man, co-ordinated with a study of populations and com- 
munities in the field. 

Biology 400 — Field Biology. Ten quarter hours credit. Eight 
weeks, summer session. Lectures, laboratory and extensive field studies. 
Prerequisites: 25 quarter hours in the Biological Sciences with at 
least 5 hours in animal science and 5 hours in plant science. Geology 
recommended. At Armstrong State College five hours credit may 
apply toward the major in biology, the other five hours will apply as 
elective credit. 

The study of representative terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna 
and the interplay with their environments. Frequent one day field 



COURSE OFFERINGS fH 

trips within a thirty-mile radius of the Field Station at Rock Eagle 
and one or more extended field trips of several days duration. For 
details, consult the Department Chairman. 

Biology 410 — Cellular Physiology (3-4-5). Prerequisites: Zoology 
i90 and one other senior division course in biology, plus 5 hours of 
organic chemistry. 

A consideration of the relationships between sub-microscopic 
anatomy and cell chemistry, emphasizing permeability, metabolism, 
and growth. 

Biology 440 — Cytology (2-6-5). Prerequisite: Two senior divi- 
sion courses in biology. 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, metabolism, growth, 
differentiation, and reproduction. 

Biology 450 — Evolution (3-0-3). Prerequisite: major in biology 
fat least 15 qtr. hrs. credit in senior division courses). 
Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

Botany 121 — General Botany (3-4-5). 

A study of the structure of the roots, stems, and leaves, basic 
physiology and ecology of plants. Laboratory work on representative 
species. 

Botany \22— General Botany (3-4-5) . Prerequisite: Botany 121. 

A study of reproduction, heredity, and evolution of seed plants, 
with studies of representative species of the other major plant groups. 
Laboratory work includes field tr ips. 

Botany 305 — Identification of Flowering Plants (0-10-5). Pre- 
requisites: Botany 121 and 122 or equivalent in other biological 
sciences. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis on wild 
flowers. 

Botany 323 — Plant Anatomy (0-10-5). Prerequisite: Botany 
121-122. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems of 
vascular plants, and a comparative study of the structure of roots, 
stems, leaves, flowers and fruits. 

Botany 380 — Plant Physiology (3-4-5) . Prerequisites: Botanv 121 
and 122. 

A survey of physiological processes occurring in economic plants 
and the conditions which affect these processes. 



62 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Entomology 301 — Introductory Entomology I (3-2-4). Prerequi- 
sites: Two courses in plant or animal biology. 

An introduction to the study of insects — their structure, identifi- 
cation, and biology. 

Entomology 302 — Introductory Entomology 11 (3-2-4). Pre- 
requisite: Entomology 301. 

A continuation of an introduction to the study of insects — in- 
cluding population dynamics, economic importance, and control 
measures. 

Zoology \0\-\02— Introductory Zoology (8-6-10). 

A basic course intended to acquaint the student with biological 
principles and their application with emphasis upon the human organ- 
ism. The second quarter is a continuation of the first; no credit is 
allowed toward graduation until the sequence is completed. 

Zoology 108-109 — Human Anatomy and Physiology (6-8-10). 
Not open to pre-professional students in the biological sciences. 

A basic course considering the gross anatomy, histology and phy- 
siology of the organ systems. Laboratory work includes thorough 
dissection of a typical mammal as well as basic experiments in physi- 
ology. The second quarter is a continuation of the first; no credit is 
allowed toward graduation until the sequence is completed. 

Zoology 325 — Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5). Prerequisite: Zo- 
ology 101-102 or Botany 121-122. 

A survey of the invertebrate animals, their biology, structure, and 
relation to other animals. 

Zoology 326 — Vertebrate Zoology (3-4-5). Prerequisite: Zoology 
101-102 or Botany 121-122. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and natural 
history of the vertebrate animals. 

Zoology 355 — Embryology (3-4-5). Prerequisites: Zoology 326 
or equivalent in another biological science. 

An elementary course in embryology in which the chick is used 
to illustrate the basic principles of developmental anatomy. 

Zoology 356 — Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates (3-6-6). 
Prerequisite: Zoology 326. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertebrates. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 63 

• Zoology 357 — Animal Histology (3-4-5). Proreqiiisitos: Zoology 

325 and Zoology 326. 

A study of the tissues aud theii organization into oigans and 
orsran systems in animals. 

Zoolooy 372 Parasitolo^iy (3-4-5). Prerequisites: Zoology 325 
I and 326. 

A comparatixe study of the internal parasites of man and the 
lower animals. 

/.oology 390 — General Animal Physiology (3-4-5). Prerequisite: 
Zoology 101-102 and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to general physiological processes. 

Zoology 429 — Endocrinology {?>A-'b) . Prerequisites: Zoology 390 
and one other senior division course in biology. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism 
and reproductive cycles. 



General Schedule for Upper Division Courses 
in Biology 

y — each year 
2y — alternate years 

Fall Winter 

Embryology (y) Comp. Vert. Anatomy (y) 

Histology (y) Genetics (y) 

Microbiology I (y) Animal Ecology (2y) (not in 66-67) 

Cytology (2y) (not in 66-67) Microbiology 11 (2y) 

Plant Anatomy (2y) Plant Physiology (2y) (not in 66-67) 

General Entomology (2y) Endocrinology (2y) (not in 66-67) 



Spring 



Anim. physiology (y) 

Plant Taxonomy (y) 

Parasitology (y) 

Plant Ecology (2y) (not in 66-67) 

Microtechniques (2y) 



Botany 

(See listing under Department of Biology) 



64 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Orange Hall, Head; Professors Davis and Bhatia; Associate 

Professor Haas: Assistant Professor McCarthy; Instructors 

Hoffman and Vining. 

Major Concentrations. (For Business Education, see listing under 
B. B.A. degree Hlb). No student will be allowed to take an upper 
division course unless he has earned a grade of '*C" or better in pre- 
requisite courses. An average of at least 2.0 in his major courses will 
be a requirement for graduation. 

1. Accounting 

InteiTnediate Accounting 
Cost Accounting 
Income Taxation 
Accounting Systems 
Auditing Principles 
Advanced Cost Accounting 

2. Economics 

Price and Income Theory 
Comparative Economic Systems 
Business Cycles and Forecasting 
Economic History of the United States 
Government and Business 
Public Finance 
International Trade 
Investments 

3. Management 

Personnel Administration 
Production Planning and Control 
Business Policy 
Human Relations in Business 
Government and Business 

• Second Course in Business Law 
Managerial Accounting 

Cost Accounting 

• Business Communications 
Industrial Psychology 



I 



COURSE OFFERINGS 65 



Course Offirincjs 
Business Adiiiiiiistration 

Busiru>.\ Adiniuistration 2\\— Introductory Accounting 1. (5-0-5). 

All introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of 
accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, working pa- 
pers, accounting statements, controlling accounts, special journals, 
partnerships and corporations. 

Business Administration 212 — Introductory Accounting II. 
(5-0-5.) Prerequisite: Business Administration 211. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as departmental operations, manufacturing accounts, the analysis of 
financial statements, accounting aids to management, statement of 
application of funds. 

Business Administration 301 — Intermediate Accounting I. (5-0-5) . 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Accounting theory and the solution of problems requiring an 
application of accounting theory. 

Business Administration 302 — Intermediate Accounting II. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 301. 

A continuation of Business Administration 301 emphasizing the 
theories of valuation of fixed assets and liability accounts, the appli- 
cation of these theories and the interpretation of financial statements 
prepared on the basis of these theories. 

Business Administration 307 — Business Lan I. (5-0-5). 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the following 
subjects: Contracts, offer and acceptance, consideration, rights of 
third parties and discharge; agency, liabilities of principal and agent; 
negotiable instruments, elements of negotiability, endorsement and 
transfer, liabilities of parties. 

Business Administration 308 — Business Law II. (5-0-5). 

The law applicable to the following subjects: partnership forma- 
tion, powers and liabilities of partners; corporation, formation, powers, 
rights of security holders; sales, vesting of title, warrants, remedies. 

Business Administration 315 — Business Communications. (5-0-5). 

Principles of effective business communications, application of 
these principles to business and technical report writing, correspon- 
dence, and other information media. 



66 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Business Administration 320 — Business Finance. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisites: Business Administration 212, Economics 202. 

The internal and external sources of financing for business enter- 
prises; acquisition and management of long-term and shorter-term 
funds: types of securities; equity and debt instruments: problems of 
financing management. 

Business Administration 329 — Cost Accounting I. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 212. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing, 
including job order and process methods. 

Business Administration 330 — Cost Accounting II. 5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 329. 

Standard cost procedures; budgeting: distribution costs and spe- 
cial cost problems. (Not offered in 1966-67.) 

Business Administration 340 — Principles of Marketing. (5-0-5!. 
Prerequisite: Economics 202. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and 
services from producers to consumers. 

Business Administration 360 — Principles of Management. (5-0-5^. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

The basic principles of management applicable to all forms of 
business and to all levels of super\ision : the functions of planning, 
organizing, directing, and controlling as components of the manage- 
ment process. 

Business Administration 375 — Personnel Administration. ^5-0-5 'i. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 360. 

Personnel administration as a staff function. Emplo\Tnent stan- 
dards, training, safety and health, employee services and industrial 
relations. 

Business Administration 425 — Managerial AccountiTig. (5-0-5 '». 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Emphasizes theory and practice of accounting from the standpoint 
of those in command who shape business policv. Not offered in 
1966-67.) 

Business Administration 436 — Income Taxation. 5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 212. 

A study of federal income tax laws, and the income tax returns 
of individuals, partnerships, and corporations. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 67 

Business Administration 440 — Accounting Systems. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Adniinistration 302. 

The design and installation of appropriate accounting systems in 
accordance with the needs of the business being sei-\'iced. (Not offered 
in 1966-67 . 

Business Administration 450 — Auditing Principles. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 302. 

The principles of audits and financial verifications, standards of 
field work, preparation of audit working paj^ers, writing audit reports, 
and auditing ethics. 'Not offered in 1966-67). 

Business Administration 460 — Production Planning and Control. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 360. 

Appreciation of the principles of production management is 
developed through study of plant layout, inventor^' control, materials 
handling:, production scheduling, quality control, and associated topics. 
(Not offered in 1966-67). 

Business Administration 462 — Human Relations in Industry. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 360. 

A study of the process of integrating people into the work situ- 
ation so that they are motivate to work together harmoniously, pro- 
ductively, and with economic, psychological and social satisfactions. 
(Not offered in 1966-67). 

Business Administration 465 — Business Policy. (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Business Administrtaion 360. 

The formulation and application of business policy by top man- 
agement. Emphasis is on decision-making. (Not offered in 1966-67). 

Commerce 

Commerce 101 — Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall, winter and 
Spring. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper tech- 
nique and mastery of the keyboard. 

Commerce 102 — Beginning Typing Continued fO-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. 

This course is a continuation of speed development. In addition, 
instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulations is given. 

Commerce 103 — Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter and 
j Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 101-102 or equivalent. 



68 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

A typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed build- 
ing and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, 
minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce 111 — Beginning Shorthand (5-0-3). Fall. Complete 
theory of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Reading dictation and transcrip- 
tion from studied material. A dictation speed of 80 words a minute is 
attained. 

Commerce 112 — Beginning Shorthand (Continued) (5-0-3). 
Winter. A continuation of beginning shorthand from foundation 
learned in fall quarter. 

Commerce 113 — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-3). Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of 100 words a minute. 

Commerce 201 — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 103 or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and ac- 
curacy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and 
business papers. Most of the student's work is done on a production 
timing basis. 

Commerce 202 — A continuation of Commerce 201 (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. 

Commerce 203 — A continuation of Commerce 202 (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. An average of 60 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 211 — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-3). Fall. Prerequi- 
sites: Commerce 111, 112, 113 or equivalent. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are ap- 
plied in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in 
transcribing. Dictating and typing of mailable letters are emphasized. 
A speed of 110 words a minute for five minutes is attained. 

Commerce 213 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 112 or equivalent or permission of instructor. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible, including the instruction of various business machines. Practical 
problems deal with typing, filing and office courtesy. 

Economics 

Economics 201 — Principles of Economics, I. (5-0-5). 

A study of the principles underlying the economic institutions of 
the present time and their application to economic problems. 



I 






COURSE OFFERINGS 69 

Economics 202 — Principles of Economics, 11. (5-0-5). 

A continuation of the study of economic jjiinciplcs and piol)lcnis 
begun in Economics 201. 

Economics 326 — Economic History of the United States. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 202. 

riie growth and development of economic institutions in tlu! 
L'nited States from the colonial period to the present, with major 
emphasis on the period since 1860, and including developments in 
agriculture, industry, labor, domestic and foreign commerce, trans- 
portation, and finance. 

Economics 327 — Money and Banking. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 202. 

Monetary theory, banking theory and practice, central bank con- 
trols, other financial institutions, credit flows, monetary policies to 
achieve desired economic effects. 

Economics 331 — Labor and Industrial Relations. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Economics 202. 

The development and structure of the labor movement in the 
United States ; the principles of wage determination : collective bargain- 
ing; and public policy toward labor unions. 

Economics 335 — Public Finance. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 202. 

The economic effects of governmental taxation, expenditure, and 
public debt management. The principal sources of revenue and types 
of expenditures at the federal, state and local levels. The proper 
scope of government and issues of fairness in taxation. (Not offered 
in 1966-67). 

Economics 401 — Price and Income Theory. (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Economics 202. 

Economic theor)^, especially the theories of production, price de- 
termination, income distribution and their application to current 
economic problems. (Not offered in 1966-67). 

Economics 405 — Government and Business. (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Economics 202. 

The effects of public policies upon business and industry, with 
emphasis on anti-trust, taxation, regulatory, and defense policies. 

Economics A\^ — International Trade. ('5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 202. 



70 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Export-import trade, emphasizing exchange techniques, balance 
of trade and payments accounts, and the theory of international 
specialization and exchange, the relationship of international trans- 
actions to national income. (Not offered in 1966-67). 

Economics 420 — Comparative Economic Systems. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Economics 202. 

Study of economic problems under different economic systems such 
as capitalism, socialism; and introduction to Marxian economic theory. 
(Not offered in 1966-67). 

Economics 425 — Business Cycles and Forecasting. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisites: Economics 327 and Business Administration 320. 

A study of cycle and growth theories, causes of business fluctu- 
ations, means of prevention or control, policy proposals to maintain 
full employment and price stability. Problems of economic growth and 
forecasting. (Not offered in 1966-67). 

Economics 431 — Investments. (5-0-5 
327. and Business Administration 320. 



Prerequisites : Economics 



The investment risks inherent in different investment media; selec- 
tion of appropriate media in accordance with individual or institutional 
goals and risk-bearing capacity. Tvpes of investments and securities. 
(Not offered in 1966-67). 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEIVUSTRY & PHYSICS 

Professor Fretwell G. Crider, Head; Professor deslslets; Associate 

Professor Stratton; Assistant Professor Brimclow; 

Instructor Pevton 



Departmental Requirements for the Major in Chemist] 



I. Major Requirements 

A. Lower Division 

General Inorganic Chemistry- (128, 129) 
Analytic Chemistr\' (Qual. 281; Quant. 282) 

B. Upper Division 

Organic Chemistry (341. 342, 343) 
Physical Chemistry (491, 492, 493) 
Electives (13 qtr. hrs.) from the following: 

Advanced Inorganic (421) 4 qtr. hi-s. 

Qualitative Organic Analysis (448) 4 qtr. hrs. 

Instrumental Analysis (480) 5 qtr. hrs. 



Quartet 
Hours 



10 
10 



15 
12 
13 



COURSE OFFERINGS 71 

Special Problems in Cllieiiiistrv 

(498, 499) 1-5 qtr. his. 
Chemistry 431, 432, 441 

II. Requirements in Related Fields 

A. Mathematics through Calculus 15 

B. Physics ' 15 

Course Offerings 
Chemistry 

Chemistry 121, 122 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Prerequisite: 
Entrance Requirements. 

This course is designed for the student who is pursuing a non- 
science college major. It includes a study of the fundamental laws and 
theories of chemistry emphasizing the descriptive chemistry of the 
elements and their relationships as shown in the Periodic Table. 
The course is a lecture and laboratory study with minimum reliance 
on mathematics. 

Chemistry 128, 129 — General Inorganic (3-4-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 9. 

A study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry 
with a quantitative approach to the subject. This course is designed 
for the science major expecting detailed work in the modern concept 
of the atom, chemical bonding and a thorough treatment of the 
chemistrv' of particular elements, families and groups. The laboratory 
work includes an understanding of fundamental techniques as applied 
to beginning experiments and a study of properties and preparations. 

Chemistry 281 — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 129. 

Theory and adequate laboratory practice in the analysis of com- 
mon cations and anions. 

Chemistry 282 — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (2-9-5). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 281. 

The fundamental theories and practice of gravimetric and volu- 
metric analysis with an introduction to instrumental analysis. 

Chemistry 341, 342, 3^3— Organic Chemistry (3-6-5). Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 129. 

Three quarter course in the study of aliphatics, aromatic hydro- 
carbons and their derivatives. Includes the study of polyfunctional 
compounds, polynuclear hydrocarbons, carbohydrates, amino acids, 



72 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

heterocyclics and related compounds. The courses will emphasize 
organic reactions in terms of modern electronic theory. 

Chemistry 360 — Biochemistry (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 
343. 

A study of the chemical nature of cellular constituents and their 
metabolisms. 

Chemistry 371 — Industrial Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 493. 

This course presents a study of inorganic chemical industries. 
It deals with chemical processes and modern developments in these 
industries. A survey of operations and economics is given. (Not 
offered in 1966-67) ' 

Chemistry ?>12 — Industrial Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 493. 

This course covers the important organic chemical industries in 
the same manner as Chemistry 371. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

Chemistry ^2\ — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4-0-4). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistr)' 282. 

Selected topics in inorganic chemistry tending to increase stu- 
dents' understanding of mechanisms of chemical reactions. Empha- 
sizes the periodicity of elements. 

Chemistry 431, 432 — Seminars (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Chem- 
istry 493. Chemistry 343. 

Selected topics for group discussion. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

Chemistry 441 — Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequi- 
site: Chemistr\^ 343. 

A further study of important organic reactions including theories 
of reaction mechanisms of organic chemistry. 

Chemistry 448 — Organic Qualitative Analysis (2-6-4). Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 343. 

Systematic approach to the identification of organic compounds. 

Chemistry Ab^ — Chemical Literature (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 493 or consent of Department Head. A 

A study of the use of the chemical library and the important 
journals, references and information sources. Course will include 
instruction in report writing. (Not offered in 1966-67) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 73 

Chemistry AQO — Instrumental Analysis (2-9-5). Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 282, 342. 

Includes study of principles involved in the operation and the 
lahoratory use of special instruments for analysis. 

Chemistry 491, 492, A9?>— Physical Chemistry (3-3-4). Prerequi- 
sites: Chemistry 343, 282. Physics 206. Mathematics 104. 

Fundamental principles of physical chemistry including the study 
of solids, liquids, gases, thermochemistry, thermodynamics and solu- 
tions. The course will also cover a study of chemical equilibria, chemi- 
cal kinetics, electrochemistry, colloids, quantum mechanics and nu- 
clear chemistry. 

Chemistry 498, 499 — Special Problems (Schedule and credit 
vary) . Prerequisites: Chemistry 493 and consent of Department Head. 

Problems to be assigned and work directed by a member of the 
Department. Supervised research including literature search, labora- 
tory experimentation and presentation of results. Course credit will 
depend on problem. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

Chemistry 105 — Chemistry for Nurses (4-3-5). 

Principles of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with 
special application to nursing practice. 

Physical Science 

Physical Science 111 (5-0-5.) Fall. No prerequisite. 

A study of the scientific method and its use in man's solutions 
of problems in his physical environment. The student learns the 
fundamentals of physics and acquires familiarity with the basic formu- 
las and principles. He learns the similarity of the application of 
principles involving small particles to larger or planetary particles. 
If student has completed a course in college physics, no credit will 
be given for this course. 

Physical Science 113 (5-0-5). Spring. No prerequisite. 

A survey of elementary geology and astronomy. This course 
covers what might be termed a "Biology of the Earth", concerning 
itself with earth materials, weather and climate, rocks and minerals, 
erosion and sedimentation, vulcanism and diastrophism, the law of 
uniform change and earth history as interpreted from the rock record. 
The astronomy phase and the study of the stars and galaxies starts 
with the planetary system of our own sun. The study proceeds to 
the other stars and stellar systems, including, of course, the nebulae. 
Finally, the course covers general relativity and cosmology, entering 



74 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

the frontiers of Physical Science to conjecture on the "science of 
tomorrow". 

Physics 

Physics 211 — General Physics — Mechanics (5-2-5). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 101 and 102 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations, and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of mechanics, sound and heat. Force and motion, work 
and power, energy, torque, the properties of gases and an introduc- 
tion to Thermodynamics are included. 

Physics 212 — Electricity, Magnetism and Basic Light Through 
Geometric Optics. (5-2-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 
and 102, or consent of the instructor. 

Physics 212 comprises a course in electricity, magnetism, and 
geometric optics. It includes the study of static electricity, current 
electricity, magnetism, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, 
capacitance, inductance and alternating currents. The nature and 
propagation of light, reflection and refraction, mirrors and lenses, 
optical instruments are covered in the latter part of the course. 

Physics 213 — Light Phenomena and Modern Physics. (5-2-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 and 102 and Physics 212 or 
consent of the instructor. 

Physics 213 continues the study of the phenomena of light, in- 
cluding interference, diffraction, and polarization; and then proceeds 
into modern physics via the quantum theory of radiation, atomic 
structure, and the theory of relativity. 

Physics 217 — Mechanics, Sound and Heat (5-3-6). Fall and 
Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or 201. (This course may 
be taken concurrently.) 

Physics 217, 218, and 219 together constitute a thorough course 
in basic physics for engineering students. This course includes classical 
physics, and an introduction to modern physics (to which more than 
one quarter of the three courses is devoted) including the quantum 
theory of radiation, atomic structure, relativity, X-Ray, wave versus 
corpuscular propagation, natural radioactivity, nuclear reactions, 
and artificial radioactivity, nuclear energy and cosmic rays, and the 
fundamental particles. 

The five classroom hours each week include some lectures and 
films, but the solution of a large number of problems is required, 
including application of the elements of the calculus. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 75 



Vhv lahoratoiy work is dt^simu'd to gi\r practice in the art of 
inakiiii]^ prrcisr nu-asuiciiu'iits, proficiency in the nianijjulation of 
apparatus and added familiarity with some of the concepts of physics. 
The theory of errors is stressed enough to give students the ability 
to decide under what conditions the greater expense of more precise 
measurements is justified. 

Physics 217 is an intensive course in mechanics, sound and heat. 
It includes the study of statics, kinetics, friction, work, power, energy, 
momentum, machines, elasticity, fluid mechanics, harmonic motion, 
wave motion and vibrating bodies, temperature-expansion, heat trans- 
fer, work and heat, and the laws of thermodynamics. 

Physics 218 — Electricity, Magnetism and Basic Light Through 
Geometric Optics (5-3-6). Winter. Prerecjuisite: Mathematics 201 
or 202. 

Physics 218 is an intensive course in electricity, magnetism, and 
geometric optics. It includes the study of the ideal gas and the atomic 
view of matter, static electricity, current electricity, magnetism, mag- 
netic fields, electromagnetic inductian, capacitance, inductance, alter- 
nating currents, electrical instruments, electromagnetic waves, nature 
and propagation of light, reflection and refraction, mirrors and lenses, 
optical instruments. 

Physics 219 — Light Phenomena and Modern Phenomena and 
Modern Physics (5-3-6). Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202 or 
203, and Physics 218. 

Physics 219 continues the study of the phenomena of light, in- 
cluding interference, diffraction, and polarization; and then proceeds 
into modem physics via the quantum theory of radiation, atomic 
structure, and the theories of relativity (see Physics 217, above). 
During this quarter laboratory work is on a "senior course" level and 
is designed to encourage independent thought and to deviate defi- 
nitely from the somewhat stereotyped work of the preceding quarters. 

Chinese 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

Conimerce 

(See listing under Department of Business Administration) 

Economics 

(See listing under Department of Business Administration) 



76 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Professor Albert Clarke. Head; Assistant Professor Coleman 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Elementary Education 

The program leading to a degree in teacher education is a 
shared responsibility of the entire college. It is designed to offer a 
broad cultural foundation of general courses, psychology and edu- 
cation courses to develop the understanding and competencies nec- 
essary for successful teaching; specialized courses to prepare for the 
various content areas in the elementary curriculum, and a concen- 
tration of courses to develop special strengths in one chosen area. 

A student who desires to become an elementary teacher should 
request immediate assignment to the Department of Education for 
advisement. He should follow without deviation the approved pro- 
gram designed for his preparation and for meeting the requirements 
for certification to teach in grades one through seven. 

The student's departmental adviser will furnish materials out- 
lining procedures for formal admission to the teacher education pro- 
gram and the sequence in which courses must be taken. 



Freshman and Sophomore Requirements 



Course 



Qtr. Hrs. Course 



English 101. 102 10 

Histor>- 114. 115 10 

Political Science 113 .— 5 

Botanv 121. 122 or 

Zoology 101. 102 10 

Mathematics 105 5 

Education 103 _ 3 

Phvsical Education 3 



Qtr. Hrs. 



English 201. 202 .. 10 

History 351. 352 _ 10 

Geo8:raphv 1 1 1 5 

Chemistr\- 121, 122 or 

Phvsics 211, 212 10 

English 228 5 

.\n 200. Music 200 or 

Philosophy 110 5 

Education 103 2 

Phvsical Education 3 



Course 



Junior and Senior Requirements 

Qtr. Hrs. Course Qtr. Hrs. 



Teaching Field 

Electives 

Music 320 „.... 

.^rt 320 


15 

5 

5 


Teaching Field 

Elective 
Related Area 

Elective 

Mathematics 452 

Education 425 

Education 435 

Education 436 
Education 446. 447. 448 


5 

5 


Health and Physical 

Education 320 


5 


5 
5 


English 331 


5 


5 


Psychology 201 

Psychology 301 

Education 301 


5 

5 

5 


5 

15 



I 



COURSE OFFERINGS 77 

Course Offerings 

Education 103- Oiinitatiou to 'rcacJuJiii. T) Qti . His. 

The study of the status of rducation and of teaching as a pro- 
fession. The student engages in directed self-study and plans for the 
achievement of his professional goals. 

Education 301 — Child Development and Education Process. 

5 Qtr. Hrs. 

A study of the developmental learning characteristics of pupils 
in relation to ways in which the school environment may elicit 
further development. Directed observation. 

Education 303 — Orientation to Teaching. 5 Qtr. Hrs. 

For transfer and other students who have not had Education 
103, 201 or the equivalent in preparation for formal admission to 
the teacher education program. 

Education 425 — The Teaching of Reading 5 Qtr. Hrs. 

The teaching of reading including methods, techniques and 
materials. 

Education 435 — Curriculum Planning 5 Qtr. Hrs. 

The study of existing instructional programs and experiences 
in curriculum design. Directed observation. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

Education 436 — Methods of Teaching 5 Qtr. Hrs. 

The study and evaluation of teaching equipment materials and 
methods in the various teaching fields. Actual unit development in 
preparation for student teaching. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

Education 446, 447, 448 — Student Teaching 15 Qtr. Hrs. 

Students are placed in selected schools for one quarter as full- 
time student staff members. Classroom teaching experiences and 
other staff responsibilities are supervised jointly by the college staff 
and supervising teachers in the selected schools. (Not offered in 
1966-67) 

Education Courses Offered in Other Departments 

Art 320 — Art for the Elementary Teacher (5-0-5). 

A study of materials and methods for teaching art at the ele- 
mentary school level. 

English 331 — Children's Literature (5-0-5). 



78 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Mathematics 452 — Basic Ideas of Arithmetic (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 105. 

This course is designed to give elementary teachers a clear under- 
standing of the fundamental ideas of arithmetic and to acquaint 
them with the material currently being used in the elementary schools. 

Music 320 — Music for the Elementary Teacher (5-0-5). 

An introduction to music skills and materials for the elementary 
classroom teacher. 

Physical Education 320- — Health and Physical Education for the 
Elementary School Teacher (5-0-5). 

Psychology 301 — Educational Psychology (5-0-5) Summer, 

Special emphasis is placed upon developing competencies on the 
part of the prospective elementary and high school teachers in under- 
standing and applying the psychological principles involved in the 
learning processes and understanding the development of children 
and youth. Supervised visits will be made to schools for observation 
and study, when possible. 

Engineering 

(See listing under Department of Mathematics) 

English f 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Professor Harry Persse, Head 

Departmental Requirements for the 

Major in Music 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in Music 

In addition to satisfying the requirements of the core curriculum 
for the Bachelor of Arts Degree, those majoring in music will com- 
plete the following program: 

Lower Division Courses: 

Music Theory: Music 110. Ill, 112 9 

210, 211, 212 9 

Sight-Singing: Music 101, 102, 103 S 

201, 202, 203 _.... Si 

.\pplied Music: Music 100 level S 



COURSE OFFERINGS 79 

200 level 6 

Total 36 



Upper Division Courses: 



Music Histor>: Music 310, 311 10 
Music Theory: Music 312 plus either 

Music 410 or 41 1 6 

Applied Music: 300 and/or 400 level 6 

Total 22 

In addition to the above, the major program must include twenty- 
five quarter hours of approved electives in the fields of Art History, 
Literature, and Philosophy. 

Additional courses in music may be elected, but no more than 
seventy hours in the major field may be applied towards the degree. 



Course Offerings 
Art 

Art 101 — Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5). 

An introduction to the principles of design and the means and 
materials of drawing. 

Art 102 — Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5). 
A continuation of Art 101. 

Art 103 — Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5). 
A continuation of Art 102. 

Art 200— Art Appreciation (5-0-5). 

The study of theories of art and their application in master- 
works of art from all ages, directed towards increasing the under- 
standing and enjoyment of art for the non-art major. 

Art 201 — Drawing and Painting (0-6-3). 

Drawing and painting from various figures, animals, and objects, 
employing various materials and media. 

Art 202— Drawing and Painting (0-6-3). 
A continuation of Art 201. 

Art 203 — Drawing and Painting (0-6-3). 
A continuation of Art 202. 

Art 290— History of Art (5-0-5). 

A survey of world art from ancient times through the Baroque. 



80 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Art 29\— History of Art (5-0-5). 

A survey of world art from the end of the seventeenth century 
to the present. 

Art 320 — Art for the Elementary Teacher (5-0-5). 

A study of materials and methods for teaching art at the ele- 
mentary school level. 

Art '^OX— Ceramics (3-4-5). 

An introductory course in the fundamentals of pottery, clay, 
modeling, glazing and firing methods. 

Art ^602— Ceramics (3-4-5). 

A continuation of Art 301 with emphasis on the potter's wheel, 
and the study of glaze materials. 

Art 303— Ceramics (3-4-5). 

A continuation of Art 302 with emphasis on the potter's wheel 
and an introduction to elementary ceramic technology. 

Course Offerings 

Music 

Theoretical Courses 

Music llO— Music Theory (3-0-3). Fall. 

An introduction to the basic theoretical principles of music. 

Music 111— Music Theory (3-0-3). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 110 wdth emphasis on part-writing of 
triads and their inversions. 

Music 112 — Music Theory (3-0-3). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 111 through inversions of the dominant 
seventh chord and secondary seventh chords. 

Music \0\-^ioht Sinoing (2-0-1). Fall. 

A study of sight singing techniques applied to diatonic materials. 

Music \02—Sight Singi7ig (2-0-1). Winter. 
A continuation of Music 101. 

Music 103— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Spring. 
A continuation of Music 102. 

Music 210— Music Theory (3-0-3). Fall. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 81 

A continuation of the study of basic materials with emphasis 
on secondary seventh chords and simple modulation. 

Music 2\\— Music Theory (3-0-3). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 210 introducing altered chords and 
modulation to remote keys. 

Music 212— Music Theory (3-0-3). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 211 emphasizing chromatic materials. 

Music 20\— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Fall. 

A study of sight singing techniques applied to chromatic mate- 
rials. 

Music 202— Sight Si7igiTig (2-0-1). Winter. 
A continuation of Music 201. 

Music 203— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Spring. 
A continuation of Music 202. 

Music 312— Form and Analysis (3-0-3). (Not offered 1966-67). 

The study of the formal principles of music as exemplified in 
musical works of various style periods. 

Music ^10— Tonal Counterpoint (3-0-3). (Not offered 1966-67). 
A study of the contrapuntal techniques of 18th Century Style. 

Music 4\\— Modal Counterpoint (3-0-3). (Not offered 1966-67). 
A study of the contrapuntal techniques of the 16th Century Style. 

Music 4\2— 20th Century Materials (3-0-3). (Not offered 1966- 

A study of the materials and techniques of 20th Century music. 

Music 450— Orchestration (3-0-3). (Not offered 1966-67). 

An introduction to the techniques of scoring for instrumental 
ensembles and the orchestra. 

Music 350— Conducting (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the problems and techniques of conducting. 

Music 320 — Music for the Elementary Teacher (5-0-5). 

An introduction to music skills and materials for the elementary 
classroom teacher. 

History and Literature Courses 

Music 200 — Music Appreciation (5-0-5). 



67) 



82 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy 
fine music by analysis of form, style and mediums of musical expres- 
sion from the great periods of musical art. Lectures, discussions and 
recorded sessions comprise the course. 

Music 3 \0— Music History (5-0-5). (Not offered 1966-67). 

The history of music in Western civilization from its origins 
through the Baroque period. 

Music 311— Music History (5-0-5). (Not offered 1966-67). 

The history of music in Western civilization from the Baroque 
period to the present. 

Music 312— Opera Literature (3-0-3). (Not offered 1966-67). 

A study of operatic masterpieces from the origin of the form to 
the present. 

Music 321 — Music of the Renaissance (3-0-3). (Not offered 
1966-67). 

The development of music from 1450 to 1600. 

Music 322— Music of the Baroque ^3-0-3). (Not offered 1966- 

67). 

The development of music from 1600 to 1750. 
Applied Music Courses 

Applied music courses consist of one or two twenty-five minute 
private lessons per week. A special fee of $24.00 for one lesson per 
week or $48.00 for two lessons per week is applicable. 

No student will be permitted to register for applied music courses 
for credit until he has reached an adequate level of proficiency in his 
instrument. The standard of such proficiency will be set by the Fine 
Arts Department, and the level of achievement in the individual 
case will be determined by examination. 

Music 130, 131, 132: 230, 231. 232: 330, 331, 332: 430, 431, 432 
— Applied Music. One hour credit per quarter. One twenty-five 
minute private lesson per week. 

Music 140, 141, 142; 240, 241, 242; 340, 341, 342; 440, 441, 442 
— Applied Music. Two hours credit per quarter. Two twenty-five ■ 
minute private lessons per week. I 

French 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 8:5 

Geojxraphy 

(Sec listing under Departnirnt of History and Political Science) 

German 

^Scc listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY & 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Roy Carroll, Head: Professors Beecher and Wu; Associate 

Professors Coyle, Haunton, Lanier, Newman; Assistant Professors 

Duncan and McCarthy. 

Departmental Requirements for the Major in History 

Students planning to major in history arc urgently advised to 
take such courses as will satisfy the basic college requirements for 
the Bachelor of Arts degree during the Freshman and Sophomore 
years. Those planning to continue their study of history in graduate 
school are advised to select French or German as their language. 
The minimum requirement in addition to History 114 and 115 for a 
major in history is forty quarter hours from history courses num- 
bered 300 or above. In selecting courses for a major, the student may 
elect to emphasize the history of the United States, or the history 
of Europe, but he may not present a major exclusively in either of 
these areas. 

Required courses: History 114, 115, and 300, but History 114 
and 115 may not be counted in the forty quarter hours required for 
the major. It is the policy of the department to advise all history 
majors to register for History 300 in the first quarter of their Junior 
year or in the first quarter after they elect to major in history. 

The major program must also include proficiency in a foreign 
language equivalent to courses 101 through 104, and 25 quarter hours 
of courses, approved by the department, from these related fields: 
History of Art and Music, Economics, Literature, Philosophy. Political 
Science, and Sociolosjv. 

Course Offerings 
History 

History 114 — History of Western Civilization. 5 quarter hours. 
A chronological sur\ey of the main currents of political, social. 



84 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

religious, and intellectual activity in western civilization from the 
time of the ancient Mediterranean civilization to 1715. 

History 115 — History of Western Civilization. 5 quarter hours. 

A continuation of History 114 down to the present. 

History 300 — Problems in Historiography. 5 quarter hours. 

A study of the nature and meaning of history, some of the prob- 
lems involved in the writing and study of history, and selected 
interpretations. 

History 320 — The Civilization of China and the Far East, Part I. 
5 quarter hours. 

The history of East Asian civilization from ancient times through 
the eighteenth century, with special emphasis on characteristic politi- 
cal, economic, and social developments. 

History 321 — The Civilization of China and the Far East, Part 
II . 5 quarter hours. 

The history of East Asian nations from the nineteenth century 
to the present, with emphasis on political, social, economic, and in- 
tellectual developments. 

History 330 — Twentieth Century Russia. 5 quarter hours. 

An examination of the forces leading to the downfall of Tsarist 
Rusia, the Bolshevik Revolution, and the political, economic, and 
social history of the Soviet era. 

History 341 — History of England, 1450-1690. 5 quarter hours. 

Emphasis is given to the constitutional, religious, and economic 
de\elopmcnts, but social and intellectual phases are treated. 

History 343 — Medieval Europe, 395-1350. 5 quarter hours. 

A study of Europe from the fourth to the fourteenth centurv. 
with particular attention to social, economic, and religious develop- 
ments. 

History 345 — The Renaissance and Reformation. 5 quarter hours. 

The history of Europe from 1300 to 1648. with special emphasis 
on the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe, the Protestant 
Revolt, and the Catholic Reformation. fNot offered in 1966-67) 

History 347 — The French Revolution and Napoleon. 5 quarter 
hours. 

An investigation of the ideas and events of the Old Regime and 
the Enlightenment in France; emphasis is also on the impact of the 



I 



COURSE OFFERINGS 85 

French Revolution and the career of Napoleon upon the major Euro- 

})('an nations. 

History 348- Thr History of Europe from 1815 to 1900. 5 quar- 
tfi hours. 

A study of thr most iuiportant social, political, and intellectual 
directions of European history from the Congress of Vienna to the 
end of the nineteenth century. 

History 350 — Europe in the Twentieth Century. 5 quarter hours. 

A study of the major developments in Europe since 1900, with 
emphasis upon the origins and impact of the First and Second World 
^Vars. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

History 351 — American History to 1865. 5 quarter hours. 

A general survey of the political, economic, and social history 
of the United States to the end of the Civil War. 

History 352 — America?! History Since 1865. 5 quarter hours, 

A general survey of the political, economic, and social history 
of the United States from 1865 to the present. 

History 354 — Social and Intellectual History of the United States 
Since 1865. 5 quarter hours. 

An examination of political theory, social development, and the 
principal trends of American thought since 1865. 

History 355 — Studies in American Diplomacy. 5 quarter hours. 

Studies of American objectives and policies in foreign affairs 
from colonial times to the present. 

History 356 — American Constitutional History. 5 quarter hours. 

A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the Constitu- 
tion of the United States. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

History 357 — The Old South. 5 quarter hours. 

The colonial South through secession; development and opera- 
tion of the plantation system; emergence of the ante-bellum social and 
political patterns of the region. 

History 358 — The New South. 5 quarter hours. 

Emphasis is placed upon the social, economic, and political 
readjustments of the late nineteenth century, and the impact of indus- 
trialism and liberalism in the twentieth century. (Not offered in 
1966-67) 



86 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

History 359 — Civil War and Reconstruction. 5 quarter hours. 

The causes and significance of the American Civil War, with 
minor consideration of the military campaigns; political, economic 
and social aspects of Reconstruction. 

History 360 — Recent American History. 5 quarter hours. 

Beginning with the presidency of Rutherford B. Hayes, the course 
will emphasize populism and progressivism, the period between the 
wars, and postwar readjustment. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

History 361 — Great Historians. 5 quarter hours. 

The course is designed to acquaint the student with major his- 
torians and historical philosophies through individual reading under 
the direction of the instructor. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

History 362 — Independent Study. 5 quarter hours. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual re- 
search and reading in some field of history under the supervision 
of a member of the staff. Emphasis will be on wide reading, confer- 
ences with the adviser, and written reports and essays. Open only to 
seniors with a B average in history and in their overall work. Admis- 
sion will be subject to approval of the individual adviser and of the 
Head of the Department of History. 

Geography 

Geography 111 — World Human GcograpJiy. 5 quarter hours. 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic activi- 
ties and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 

Philosophy 

Philosophy 110 — Introduction to Philosophy. 5 quarter hours. 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of 
philosophy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the 
relation of philosophy to art, science and religion. Includes a surxey 
of the basic issues and major types of philosophy, and shows their 
sources in experience, history and representative thinkers. 

Philosophy 301. — History of Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval. 
5 quarter hours. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 87 



An liistoiital intKHlm (ion [o philosophy, tiaiing thi' diAclop- 
nunt of European philosophy iioni the early Greeks throu<4h the 
Renaissance. 

Philosophy 302 — History of Philosophy: Modem. 5 cjuarter hours. 

A eontinuation of Philosophy 301 from the sev<^nteenth century 
to the present. 

Philosophy 320 — Introdiution to Oriental Philosophy. 5 quarter 
hours. 



Political Science 

Political Science 113 — Government of the United States. 5 quar- 
ter hours. 

A study is made of the structure, theory, and workings of the 
national government in the United States and some of the major 
problems of the state and local government. The course shows how 
dexelopmental practice has created our government as it stands 
today. 

Political Science 300 — Political Behavior. 5 quarter hours. 

A basic course which considers laws, concepts, theories, variables 
and hypotheses used in empirical research in political science and 
sociology- as well as some indication of the research techniques used 
in data gathering and analysis. Recent research results will be dis- 
cussed, evaluated, and their applications to the field of political 
science will be explained. 

Political Science 301-302 — Comparative Government. 5 quarter 
hours. Prerequisite: Political Science 300. 

A two quarter course, the first of which will be concerned with 
the political, social, and economic instructions of selected modern 
states of the recent past and present. The second quarter will be 
concerned with political behavior as it is revealed in a national state 
context: i.e.. the various variables that contribute to such behavior. 

Political Science 304 — Public Administration. 5 quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 300. 

This is a one quarter course that is primarily concerned with 
organizational theory and bureaucratic behavior, whether public or 
private, but with an emphasis on the behavior of the bureaucracy 
of the national government. This course will also be concerned with 
the political process as it unfolds in the administration of laws enacted 
by the Congress. A number of case studies on the subject will be 
examined in some detail. fNot offered in 1966-67) 



88 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Political Science 305 — State and Local Government. 5 quarter 
hours. Prerequisite: Political Science 300. 

This course is concerned primarily with the political process 
and the behavior of political actors at the local and state levels of 
government primarily in the United States. It is concerned with the 
techniques and research results of the relevant empirical literature 
that has evolved over the past 15 years in the field; i.e., local com- 
munity studies of Floyd Hunter, Robert A. Dahl, and others. 

Political Science 306 — International Laic. 5 qtr. hours. 

An introduction to selected public international law topics in- 
cluding: recognition, state succession, jurisdiction, extradition, na- 
tionality, the law of treaties, the law of diplomacy, and the law of 
war. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

Political Science ?)\9— International Relations. 5 quarter hours. 

An introduction to the theories, forces, and practices dominating 
contemporary international relations. 

Political Science 320 — International Relations: The Far East. 
5 quarter hours. 

Political Science 331-332 — Political Theory. 5 quarter hours. 

An historical study of the development of ideas relative to the 
state and government from Socrates and Plato to the present. .Atten- 
tion is directed primarily to the political thought of a selected group 
of eminent philosophers. 

Political Science 331 — From Socrates to the 17th Century (^5-0-5). 

Political Science 332 — From the 17th Century to the Present. 
(5-0-5). 



DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 

Professor Hugh Pendexter, HI, Head: Professors Anchors, Lubs, Scale. 

Wu; Associate Professor Strozier; Assistant Professors Carr and White: 

Instructors Durfee and Ramsev. 



Departmental Requirements for the Major in English 

A student majoring in English must complete at least 40 hours 
of upper-division courses (300-400 level) in the major field, of which 
at least 15 hours must be on the 400 level. A major program must 
include at least one of the starred courses in each of the following 
groups: 



COURSE OFFERINGS 89 

I. Shakespeare (404») 
II. English Literature before 1700 (301*, 302*, 321, 402, 403) 

III. English Literature after 1700 (303*, 305*, 306*, 307*, 311, 
312, 322) 

IV. American Literature (309*, 310*, 313, 322) 

V. Comparative Literature or English Language (318*, 322,* 
410*, Chinese 233) 

The major shall select one area of specialization from groups 
II-I\'' and complete at least two additional courses in that area 
(starred or unstarred). English 400 and 490 may, depending on the 
subject, be counted in any area of specialization. 

The major program must also include proficiency in a foreign 
language equivalent to courses 101 through 104, and 25 quarter 
hours of courses, approved by the major department, from these 
related fields: literature in a foreign language, history, philosophy, 
art. music, speech. 

Course Offerings 
Qiinese 

Chinese 101-102— Elementary Chinese (10-0-10). 

A basic training in Chinese conversation and reading. 

Chinese 201 — Intermediate Chinese (5-0-5). 

Chinese 233 — Chinese Literature in Translation (5-0-5). 

English 

Students will be assigned to freshman English according to re- 
sults of tests taken before the beginning of the term. 

English 99 — Remedial Composition (5-2-0). Non-credit. 

This is the study and practice of sentence and paragraph struc- 
ture. Students must learn to write clearly, logically, coherently, and 
correctly. In the 2-hour reading laboratory students work to improve 
reading comprehension. 

A student who fails to earn a grade of "D" or above in English 
99 may not repeat the course except by special permission of the 
department head. No student may enroll more than twice for this 
course. 

Students who are assigned to English 99 may not take English 
101 until they have completed English 99 with a grade of "C" or 
better. 



90 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

English 101 — Composition (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Assignment 
to this course is based on entrance test results or the successful com- 
pletion of English 99. English 101 must be completed with a grade of 
"C" in order to enter English 102, A library paper is written during 
the term. 

English 102 — Greek Literature and the Bible (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: English 101. 

Emphasis in composition is on critical papers longer than 1,000 
words. Reading assignments are from classical epics and tragedy, 
and the Bible. 

English 201 — Shakespeare and English Literature through the 
19th Century (5-0-5). Prerequisite: English 101, English 102. Lit- 
erary masterpieces from 1400-1850. 

English 202 — Modern World Literature (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
English 101. English 102, English 201. 

Literan- masterpieces 1850 to present. 

English 228— Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5). 

Basic principles and practices of speech. The course gives some 
attention to the physiological make-up of the speech mechanics, 
phonetics, gesture, articulation, pronunciation, and regional speech 
differences. However, it consists primarily of practicing the funda- 
mentals of speech through a wide variety of formal, informal, ex- 
temporaneous, impromptu, and group participation sf>eech exercises. 

Period Courses (poetry and prose, with a slight sampling of drama). 

English 301 — (5-0-5) Renaissance - Malory through Spenser. 

English 302— (5-0-5) 17th Century - Donne through Milton. 

English 303— (5-0-5) Restoration and 18th Century - 1660-1798. 

English 305— (3-0-3) 19th Century L Romantics. 

English 306— (3-0-3) 19th Century IL ]lctorian. 

English 307 — (5-0-5) Twentieth Century British 

English 309— (3-0-3) I9th Century American - Poe through 
Twain 

English 310— (5-0-5) 20th Century American ' 

Genre Courses 

English 331 — (5-0-5) Children's Literature (will not apply to- 
ward English major.) 



COUR SE OFFERINGS 91^ 

Enolish 311— (3-0-3) British Norcl I. Bt'oinning through 
Meredith 

English 312— (3-0-3) British Novel II. Hardy to present. 

English 313— (5-0-5) American Novel. 

English 318 — (5-0-5) Greek and Roman Drama in Translation 

English 321— (5-0-5) English Drama to 1850 (excluding Shake- 
speare ) . 

English 322 — (5-0-5) Modern British, American, and Continental 
Drama, Ibsen to present. 

English 325 — (5-0-5) Advanced Grammar — An objective exami- 
nation of the structural patterns of modern 
English by application of the new analytic 
and descriptive methods. (Not a review of 
traditional grammar.) 

Senior Courses 

English 400— (l-5)-0-(l-5) Seminar (Not offered 1966-67) 

English 402— (5-0-5) Milton. 

English 403— (5-0-5) Chaucer. (Not offered 1966-67.) 

English 404 — (5-0-5) Shakespeare. 

English 410 — (5-0-5) History of the English Language. 

English 490— [(1-5) -0-( 1-5)] Independent Study. (Not offered 
1966-67.) 

French 

French 101-102— Elementary French (10-0-10). Fall and Winter. 

A course for beginners. The approach is primarily oral, and daily 
practice with tape recordings is required. Students who own tape 
machines may have tapes recorded for home practice. 

No credit for graduation or transfer will be given until the 
sequence is completed. 

French \0— Elementary French (3-0-3). Fall. 

French 11 — Elementary French (3-0-3). Winter. 

French 12 — Elementary French (4-0-4). Spring. 



92 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

These are the same courses as French 101-102 above, but more 
time is allowed for covering the work. Students will be ♦nrolled for 
these sections on advice of the instructor. 

French 103 — Elementary French (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Two quarters of college French or two years of high school French in 
the eleventh or twelfth grades. 

A continuation of French 101-102. with a continued emphasis 
on audio-lingual skills as well as reading and writing. 

French 104 — Intermediate French (5-0-5) . Summer. Prerequisite: 
Three quarters of college French or three years of high school French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 201 — French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequi- 
site: Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere and Racine. 

French Til — French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: French 104. A study of Romantic prose, 
poetry, and drama, with lectures and discussions in French. 



German 

German 101-102 — Beginning German (10-0-10) . Fall and Winter. 

Drill upon pronunciation and elements of grammar, conversa- 
tion and the training of the ear as well as the eye. German is used 
as much as practicable in the classroom instruction. The course in- 
cludes reading of texts and translations, conversations, dictation, and 
dialogues. 

No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is completed. 

German 103 — Intermediate German (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequi- 
site: Two quarters of college German or two years of high school 
German. 

Grammar review and comparative grammar are studied for the 
purpose of enabling students to write compositions. Short stories are 
read; and conversation is practiced. 

German 104 — Intermediate German, continued 5-0-5). Prere- 
quisite : Three quarters of college German or three years of high school 
German. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 93 



Kiissian 

Russian \0l-\02-^ Klrmititary Russian (10-0-10). 

This course consists of grammar, composition, conversation, read- 
ing and dictation. No credit will be allowed toward graduation until 
the sequence is completed. 

Spanish 

Spanish \0\-\02— Elementary (10-0-10). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. No 
credit for graduation will be given until sequence is completed. No 
credit will be given for these courses if two years of high s( hool 
Spanish have been completed. 

Spanish 201 — Intermediate (5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Two quarters of college Spanish or two years of 
high school Spanish. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammer, conversation and readings. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professor Lane Hardy, Head; Professors Stubbs and Winn; Associate 
Professor Laffer; Assistant Professors Hall, and Semmes. 

Departmental Requirements for the Major in Mathematics 

A major in mathematics will consist of at least 6 courses (30 
qtr. hrs.) beyond the calculus sequence (Mathematics 104-201-202- 
203). Normally a student would accomplish this as follows: Mathe- 
matics 311-312; 321-322; and at least one of the sequences: 301- 
302; 401-402. 

Every major program must include Mathematics 311-312 and 
at least one of these sequences: 301-302; 401-402. A student may, 
however, substitute for the 321-322 sequence. 

It is recommended that a mathematics major support his work 
in mathematics with at least 15 qtr. hrs. of approved elective courses 
in related fields. 



94 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Course Offerings 
Engineering 

Engineering Graphics 113 — (0-6-2). 

Topics of study include lettering (capital and lower case): the 
use of the instruments; geometric construction; orthographic projec- 
tion; emphasis on descriptive geometry concepts as applied to the 
solution of problems involving orthographic projection of solids, 
auxiliary views, and points, lines and planes. 

Engineering Graphics 114 — (0-6-2). Prerequisite 113. 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points, 
lines and planes by use of the revolution method; intersection of sur- 
faces; warped surfaces: the development of surfaces. Practical appli- 
cations are emphasized. 

Engineering Graphics 115 — (0-6-2). Prerequisite, 114. 

Topics of study include sections and conventions; dimensioning; 
pictorial representation; detail sketches; shop processes; assembly 
drawings from detail sketches; working pictorial sketches; introduc- 
tion to charts and graphs ; reproduction processes, ink tracing on cloth ; 
graphical calculus. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 104 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus f5-0-5). Fall, 
Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Mathematics 101 — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Prerequisites: Two units of high school algebra or Mathematics 9. 

Sets, relations, functions, graphs, real numbers, inequalities, abso- 
lute value, polynomial functions. 

Mathematics 102 — Trigonometry (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. 

The trigonometric functions, inverse functions, logarithmic and 
exponential functions, mathematical induction and the binomial 
theorem, applications, complex numbers. 

Mathematics 104 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). Fall, 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 102. 

The real numbers ''especially the completeness property), co- 
ordinate systems, introduction to the integral areas, differential 
calculus, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. 



I 



COURSE OFFERINGS 95 

Mathematics 105 — An Introduction to Modern Mathematics I. 
(5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: Two units of high school 
algebra or Mathematics 9. 

This course and Mathematics 106 are designed to introduce the 
non-science major to modern mathematical concepts and to suggest 
an appropriate cultural setting for the subject. 

Mathematics 106 — An Introduction to Modern Mathematics II. 
(5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 105. 

This course will proceed in the same spirit as Mathematics 105. 
A specific area of mathematics will be studied in an effort to acxjuaint 
the liberal arts student with the work of contemporary mathemati- 
cians. Appropriate topics will be selected from one or more of the 
following areas: Abstract algebra, modern geometry, analysis, 
topology, number theory, game theors'. 

Mathematics 201 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Winter, Fall. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104. 

The differential and integral calculus of exponential, logarithmic 
and inverse trigonometric functions, elementary differential equations, 
algebra of vectors. 

Mathematics 202 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Spring, Winter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. 

Some vestor analysis, analytic geometry of two and three dimen- 
sions, conies, polar and cylindrical coordinates, the Mean- Value 
Theorem, Cauchy's Theorem, Taylor polynomials. 

Mathematics 203 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. 

Problems involving extrema, the theorems of L'Hopital and ap- 
plications, infinite sequences and series. 

Mathematics 204 — Introduction to Statistics (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 102. 

Mathematics 235 — Finite Mathematics (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 102. 

Mathematics 301, 302, ?>^?>— Advanced Calculus (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 203. 

Mathematics 305 — Differential Equations (5-0-5). Prerequisite. 
Mathematics 201. 

Mathematics 311, 312, 313— Abstract Algebra (5-0-5). Prereq- 
uisite: Mathematics 203. 

Groups, rings, fields, linear algebra. 



96 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Mathematics 321, 322, 323 — Projective and Related Geometries 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Not offered in 1966-67). 

Mathematics 401, 402, 403— Real Variables (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 203 and consent of instructor. (Not offered in 
1966-67). 

Mathematics 411, 412 — Complex Variables (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 203. (Not offered in 1966-67). 

Mathematics 421, 422 — Numerical Analysis (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 203. (Not offered in 1966-67). 

Mathematics 452 — Basic Ideas of Arithmetic (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 105. 

This course is designed to give elementary teachers a clear 
understanding of the fundamental ideas of arithmetic and to acquaint 
them with the material currently being used in the elementary 
schools. 



Music 

(See listing under Department of Fine Arts) 

Philosophy 

(See listing under Department of History and Political Science) 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Roy J. Sims, Head; Assistant Professor Tapp ; Instructor 
Smith. 

Course Offerings 

Physical Education 111 — Conditioning Course (0-2-1). Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carries, 
road work, duel combatives, and simple games. 

Physical Education 112 — Team Sports (0-2-1). Winter. 
Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 113 — Elementary Swimming (0-2-1) . Spring. 

Physical Education \\A— Officiating of Basketball (1-3-2). 
Winter. 



f 



COURSE OFFERINGS 97 

Consists of a study of rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substitute for P. E. 112. 

Physical Education 201— Elementary Tennis (0-2-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 203 — Senior Life Savino and Instructors' 
Course in Swimming (2-3-2). Spring. May be substituted for P. E. 113. 

Physical Education 204— First Aid (3-0-1). Winter. 
The American Red Cross standard course in first aid. 

Physical Education 205— Folk Rhythms (0-2-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 206 — Beginning Modern Dance (0-2-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 207 — Tap Dance for Beginners (0-2-1). 

Physical Education 208 — Adult Recreative Sports (0-2-1). 

Golf, ping-pong, pool, card games, chess, checkers and other 
quiet games. 

Physical Education 232— Bowling (0-2-1). Winter. 

Physical Education 233— Badminton (0-2-1). 

Physical Education 234:— Trampoline (0-2-1). 

The student is taught the proper care and use of the trampoline. 
He learns to perform the following skills: seat drop, knee drop, front 
drop, back drop, pull over, cradle, turntable, swivel hips, spotting, 
and somersault. 

Physical Education 236 — Intermediate Modern Dance (0-2-1). 
Prerequisite: P. E. 206. 

A continuation of Physical Education 206 with emphasis on 
dynamics, composition and choreography. 



Physical Science 

(See listing under Department of Chemistry and Physics) 

Physics 

(See listing under Department of Chemistry and Physics) 

Political Science 

(See listing under Department of History and Political Science) 



98 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY & 
SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Robert H. Cormack, Head; Professor Thompson; 
Assistant Professors Arger and Davidson 

Course Offerings 
Anthropology 

Anthropology 201 — Man and His Culture (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the study of man as a cultural animal, the 
development of human societies from preliterate beginnings, the 
rise of complex social organizations with an outline study of the 
major cultures developed by man. 



Psychology 

Psychology 100 — Psychology of Adjustment (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, 
Spring, Summer. 

This course is an orientation into college learning and to changes 
appropriate to effective use of college resources. Objective aids de- 
veloped in the field of psychology w^ill be used to explore methods 
of study that are productive in learning. Resources of psychological 
research will be applied to educational and vocational adjustment 
problems. Special emphasis is placed upon the understanding of emo- 
tional, motivational and defensive processes that affect a student's 
productivity in college. One day a week is used for students to work 
as a group on their own problems of study and adjustment. 

Psychology 201 — Introduction to Psychology (5-0-5). Fall, Win- 
ter, Spring, and Summer. 

Psychology studies individual behavior by use of various adapta- 
tions of scientific observation. This course works with the evidence 
and concepts pertaining to primary behavior processes which sys- 
tematic observation has explored. These topics, basic to understand- 
ing human behavior, include scientific methodology in psychology, 
heredity and patterns of growth, processes of learning and retention, 
adjustment processes as affected by motivation, emotions, and adapta- 
tions to frustration and conflict, sensory-perceptual processes leading 
to objective observation, and the use of these interacting processes for 
thinking purposefully, objectively, logically and creatively. By the end 
of the course the student is expected to be able to see these processes 
interacting in a given example of behavior. Principles from research 






COURSE OFFERINGS 99 

arc applied to areas of individual differences, personality formation, 
social beha\ lor and ahnorinal behavior. 

Psychology 202-203- -Introduction to Psychology with experi- 
ments. (10-0-10). Fall-Winter. 

The subject matter of Psychology 201 will be duplicated in this 
course extended over a two quarter sequence. Laboratory projects, 
demonstrations, and individual experiments will be scheduled in con- 
nection with topics listed in Introduction to Psychology to teach and 
illustrate the various scientific methods of observation used in psy- 
chology: experimental method, field studies, statistical methods, and 
clinical or case study methods of observation. It is recommended that 
students expecting to major in psychology or who have a particular 
interest in preparing for the helping professions select this two quarter 
sequence. 

Psychology 301 — Educational Psychology (5-0-5). Summer. 

Special emphasis is placed upon developing competencies on 
the part of the prospective elementary and high school teachers in 
understanding and applying the psychological principles involved 
in the learning processes and understanding the development of chil- 
dren and youth. Supervised visits will be made to schools for observa- 
tion and study, when possible. 

Psychology 303 — Social Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 201. 

This course centers on a study of the individual's interaction with 
his social groups (family, friendship groups, clubs, church groups, 
community groups). Forces of need, emotion and interests that bind 
the individual to his groups and the dynamic forces of group inter- 
action are analyzed. The live laboratory of the class itself is used 
for experiencing the processes of communication and interaction in 
a group setting. Special topics of attitude formation, leadership, 
group conflicts, social stratification, mass communication, propa- 
ganda, public opinion formation and methods of changing group pat- 
terns are studied by consulting the reports of responsible studies 
and by group projects. 

Psychology 304 — Psychology of the Abnormal (5-0-5). Winter 
Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 

This course includes a study of the \arious forms of emotional 
illness and maladjustment, including mental deficiency and anti- 
social behavior. These processes will be related to basic principles 
of human behavior that are included in Introductory Psychology. 
Trips to city and state facilities will be arranged for the observation 
of diagnostic and treatment procedures. The course is planned 
especially for students going into the helping professions. 



100 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Psychology 305 — Child and Adolescent Psychology (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 

This course presents tested information on how growth, develop- 
ment and learning affect the behavior of human beings from concep- 
tion through childhood and adolescence. Systematic study of responsi- 
ble research in this field, from life-study, clinical and experimental 
research methods, is the basis for class seminar and lecture. To supple- 
ment study of the literature projects are planned for direct observa- 
tion of child behavior in a nursery school, in various elementary school 
classes and in informal settings. When possible, special areas receive 
special study, such as testing programs, problems of exceptional chil- 
dren, child therapy or typical problems in child-parent relations and 
child placement. 

Psychology 307 — Physiological Psychology (5-0-5) . Summer: Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 201, or permission of instructor. 

Introduction to biological bases of psychological processes. Struc- 
ture and function of nervous system is studied and related to the 
behavior of humans and other organisms. 

Psychology 308 — Psychology of Perception (5-0-5). Fall Prereq- 
uisite: Psychology 201. 

An experimental, theoretical approach to problems of percep- 
tion. The role of perception in learning, emotion, and motivational 
processes is examined. Special attention is given to psychological 
methods and to the influence on perception of the context in which 
perception occurs. 

Psychology 309 — Learning and Motivation (5-0-5). Winter: Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 201. 

An examination of methodology and theory associated with the 
various forms of learning and their motivational concommitants. 
Demonstrations and experiments are designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the complexities of conditioning and the higher learning 
processes, and with the nature of methodological variables. 

Psychology 310 — History of Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Prereq- 
iisite: Psychology 201. 

A study of the basic ideas in psychology from early animism to 
modern behavioristics. Special attention is given to the philosophical 
bases at various times in the history of psychology. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 101 

Social Science 

Social Scittici' 104 — Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5). 

A study of cuiirnt economic and social statistics as pci tainini^ to 
agriculture, industry and commerce, population trends and trovein- 
mental organizations and problems. 

Sociology 

Sociology 201 — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, 
Spring, Summer. 

Sociology is the scientific study of human behavior at the group 
level. This course presents material which has been gathered by 
systematic and objective investigations of human society. Through 
the introduction of material from the fields of cultural anthropology 
and social psychology an understanding is gained not only of the 
function of culture as a factor in the socialization of the individual 
but also of the role of the individual as a member of his own society. 
Attention is then turned to the major social institutions of society 
and finally to a theoretical consideration of the social processes. 

Sociology 202 — Preparation for Marriage and Family Living 
(5-0-5). Spring. 

This course is designed as a functional approach to the problems 
associated with mate selection and marital adjustment in our society. 
As a background to the study of marriage and family living, the 
family as an institution is studied using a cross-cultural analysis of 
different societies. Each stage of preparation for marital adjustment 
is discussed including: dating, courtship, engagement, sex, financial 
adjustment, religion, recreation, friends, and children. A prominent 
medical specialist serves as a guest lecturer in the discussion of physi- 
cal adjustment in marriage and parenthood. Other guest lecturers 
include representatives from different religious faiths to discuss the 
problems associated with interfaith marriages. In this course the 
student is provided with knowledge which will encourage a mature 
and objective approach to the problems and responsibilities inherent 
in marriage and parenthood in our society today. 

Sociology 350 — Community and Social Problems (5-0-5). Winter, 
Prerequisite: Sociology 201. 

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding as 
well as a theoretical orientation to the problems of American society 
through the use of data obtained in scientific investigations of society. 
In addition to exploring the nature and origins of social problems 
in general, attention will be directed to such special areas as environ- 



102 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

mental health, poverty, unemployment, education, government, juve- 
nile delinquency, adult crime, care for dependent children, housing, 
community planning, resources for the aged, and group conflicts. 
Include in the course format are seminar discussions, individual 
study of problems of special interest, and selected field trips. The 
course is designed to stimulate the student's constructive involvement, 
as a citizen, in the life of his community. 

Russian 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

Social Science 

(See listing under Department of Psychology and Sociology) 

Sociology 

(See listing under Department of Psychology and Sociology) 

Spanish 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

Speech 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

Zoology 

(See listing under Department of Biology) 



INDEX 

AiadcMiiii- Ad\ isrnu'iil 43 

Ac.idt'iiiit Rt\i;ulations 32 

AiHclcrated Program, High School 22 

Accounting Major Requirements 64 

Administration, Officers 7 

Admission to Accelerated Program 23 

Admissions and Fees 17 

Advanced Placement 19 

Ad\isement 36 

Alumni Office 16, 50 

Anthropology Course 98 

Application Forms 17 

Application Requirements 18 

Art Courses 79 

Associate in Arts 57 

Athletics 48 

Attendance Regulation 40 

Auditing 21, 42 

Bachelor of Arts 51 

Bachelor of Arts Requirements 51 

Bachelor of Business Administration 53 

Bachelor of Science 51 

Bachelor of Science Requirements 51 

Biology Courses . 60 

Biology Department 59 

Biology Requirements 59 

Botany Courses 60 

Business Administration 64 

Business Education 55 

Calendar 3 

Chemistry Courses 71 

Chemistry Degree Requirements 70 

Chemistry and Physics Department 70 

Chinese Courses 89 

Clubs 49 

Commerce Courses 66 

Commision, Armstrong State College 6 

Community Services, Office 16 

Conduct 47 

Counselling Services 43 

Course Load 38 

Dean's List . 40 

Degree Requirements, Regulations 37 

Degrees Offered 40, 51-58 

Economics Courses 68 

103 



INDEX- (Cont'd.) 

Economics Major Requirements 64 

Education Courses 77 

Education Degree Requirements 76 

Education Department 76 

Engineering Courses ..- 94 

English Courses 89 

English Degree Requirements 88 

Entomology Courses 62 

Evening Classes 15 

Faculty 8 

Fees 28 

Financial Aid 25, 44-45 

Fine Arts Department 78 

Foreign Students 23 

French Courses 91 

Geography Course 86 

German Courses 92 

Heads of Departments 7 

Health 50 

History of College 15 

History Courses 83 

History Degree Requirements 83 

History and Political Science Department 83 

Honor System 32 

Honors 40 

Housing 1 50 

Language and Literature Department 88 

Late Registration Fee 28 

Library 15 

Management Major Requirements 64 

Mathematics Courses 94 

Mathematics Degree Requirements 93 

Mathematics Department 93 

Medical Technology 55 

Music Courses 80 

Music Degree Requirements 78 

Nursing, A. A. Degree 15 

Organizations 46 

Orientation 25, 43 

Out of State Tuition 28 

Philosophy Courses 86 

Physical Education Courses 96 

Physical Education Department 96 

Physical Science Courses . 73 

Physics Courses 74 

104 



I 



INDEX- (Cont'd.) 

Fhuc'incnt, English 19 

IMacciiK'nt, Mathematics 19 

Political Science Courses 87 

Prohation and Dismissal 41 

Probationary Summer 24 

Psychology Courses 98 

Psychology and Sociology Department 98 

Publications 48 

Readmission of Former Students 21 

Refunds 30 

Regents 5 

Registration 25 

Reports and Grades 39 

Residency Requirements 25 

Russian Courses 93 

Scholarships 44 

Sociology Courses 101 

Spanish Courses 93 

Special Students 21 

Staff, Administrative 7 

Student Activity Fee 28 

Student Government 48 

Student Services and Activities 43 

Summer on Trial Program 24 

Teacher Education 52 

Transfer Applicants, Requirements 20 

Transient Students 22 

Veterans 24 

Vocational Rehabilitation 24 

Withdrawal 42 

Zoology Courses 62 



105 



\ 




MSTRONG 
.TE COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



ARMSTRONG 
STATE 



Savannah, Georgia 




Catalo£iie Qf^Faur Year Pro^rami 




N 

▼ t 

ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS 

1. Administration Building 7. Memorial Student Center 

2. New Classroom Building 8. New Addition to Student G* 

3. Gamble Building 9. Lane Library 

4. Science Building 10. Maintenance Building 

5. New Science Building 11. Health & Physical Education I 

6. Jenkins Building 12. Parking Lot 



ARMSTRONG 
STATE COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 
1967-1968 



Summer 



Fall 



Winter 



Spring 



Biillelin of 

Armstrong State College 

Savannah, Georgia 

A Four-year College of the 
University System of Georgia 




CAO l>« 



ixQ^NCE 



FOR REFERENCt 

Do Nt Tok. Fwm W* R— » 

Membership in 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



Volume XXXn 



Number 7 



1967 



CALENDAR 



1967 



APRIL 



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CALENDAR 



1968 



JANUARY 



S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



FEBRUARY 



S M T VV T F S 



1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 

MARCH 

5 M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 





APRIL 


S M 


T \V T F S 


1 

7 8 

14 15 

21 22 

28 29 


2 3 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 

16 17 18 19 20 

23 24 25 26 27 

30 


MAY 


S M 


T W T F S 


5 6 

12 13 
19 20 

26 27 


12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 31 


JUNE 


S M 


T VV T F S 




1 



JULY 



2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 



S M T VV T F S 



12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 

AUGUST 

S M T VV T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

SEPTEMBER 

5 M T VV T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 



CALENDAR FOR 1967 - 1968 



Summer Quarter, 1967 



May 22: 
May 31: 



June 12: 
June 13: 
June 14: 
June 16: 
July 4: 
July 10: 
July 17-21: 
August 9-11 



Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all 
papers required in the application for admission. 

Last day for transient students (for Summer Quarter 
only) to file all papers required in the applica- 
tion for admission. 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Holiday 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisemcnt for Fall Quarter 

Examinations 



Fall Quarter, 1967 



July 24-28: 
September 1: 

September 21: 



September 22: 
September 25: 
September 26: 
September 29: 
November 6: 
November 13-17: 
November 20: 
November 23-24: 
December 13-15: 



Freshman Orientation 

Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all 
papers required in the application for admission 
Advisement for sophomores, juniors, seniors 

9:00- 11:00 

2:00- 5:00 
Registration 
Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 
Last day to change classes 
Mid-term reports due 
Pre-advisement for Winter Quarter 
Ga. and U.S. history and government test 
Thanksgiving Holidays 
Examinations 



Winter Quarter, 1968 



November 4: 



December 12: 

January 2: 
January 3: 
January 4: 
January 9: 
February 6: 
February 13-17: 
March 12-14: 



Administration of Scholastic Aptitude Test for appli- 
cants who wish to enroll in January. (Deadline 
for filing application for test is October 7, 1967, 
or October 21, 1967 upon payment of late regis- 
tration fee.) 

Last day for freshman and transfer students to file 
all paper required in the application for admission. 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for Spring Quarter 

Examinations 



Spring Quarter, 1968 



March 1: Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all 

papers required in the application for admission. 

March 20: Registration 

March 21: Classes begin 

March 22: Last day to register for credit 

March 27: Last day to change classes 

April 22: Mid-term reports due 

April 28 - May 3: Pre-advisement for Summer and Fall Quarters 

May 15: Honors Day Assembly 

May 29-31: Examinations 

June 3: Graduation 



Summer Quarter, 1968 



May 


20 




June 


3: 


June 


10: 


June 


11 




June 


12 




June 


14 




July 


4: 


July 


8: 


July 


15-19: 


August 


7-9 



Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all 
papers required in the application for admission. 

Last day for transient students (for Summer Quarter 
only) to file all papers required in the applica- 
tion for admission. 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Holiday 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for Fall Quarter 

Examinations 



Fall Quarter, 1968 



July 22-26: Freshman Orientation 

September 1: Last day for freshman and transfer students to file all' 

papers required in the application for admission. 
September 20: Registration 

December 11-13: Examinations 



Rt^nils, IJniversily System of Geor<j;ia 

244 Washington Street, S.W. — Fourth Floor 
ATLANTA 

State at Larpe — William S. Morris, III Augusta 

(January 5, 1967 -January 1, 1974) 

State at Large — Jack Adair Atlanta 

(January 13, 1965 -January 1, 1971) 

State at Large — Roy V. Harris Augusta 

(February 17, 1967 -January 1, 1974) 

State at Large — John A. Bell, Jr. Dublin 

(January 1, 1963 -January 1. 1970) 

State at Large— Carey W^illiams Greensboro 

(January 1, 1962 -January 1. 1969) 

First — Anton F. Solms, Jr. Savannah 

(January 1, 1962 -January 1. 1969) 

Second — John I. Spooner Donalsonville 

(January 1, 1961 -January L 1968) 

Third — T. Hiram Stanley Columbus 

(January 13. 1965 -January 1, 1972) 

Fourth — H. G. Pattillo Decatur 

(January 13, 1965 -January L 1972) 

Fifth — Jesse Draper Atlanta 

(January 1. 1961 -January 1. 1968) 

Sixth — James C. Owen Griffin 

(February 5, 1965 -January 1. 1971) 

Seventh — James \'. Carmichael Marietta 

(January 19, 1966 -January 1, 1973) 

Eighth — John W. Langdale Valdosta 

(January 13, 1964 -January 1. 1971) 

Ninth — James A. Dunlap . Gainesville 

(January 10, 1966 - January 1. 1973) 

Tenth — G. L. Dickens, Jr. Milledgeville 

rFebruary 5, 1965 - January 1. 1972) 



Officers and Staff of the Board of Regents 

Chairman James A. Dunlap 

Vice-Chairman John W. Langdale 

Chancellor . George L. Simpson. Jr. 

Vice Chancellor Fred C. Davison 

Vice Chancellor for Research Mario J. Goglia 

Treasurer James A. Blissit 

Director, Plant and Business Operations J. H. Dewberry 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Armstrong College Commission 



The Commission controls certain endowment and scholarship funds. 
Dr. Irving Victor, Chairman 
Mr. Edward Bartlett 
Mrs. Archie Herman 
Mr. John A. Peters^ Jr. 
Mr. John Ranitz, Jr. 
Mr. Harry Swicord 

Ex- Officio 

Dr. Thord Marshall 

Robert F. Lo\rETT^ The Honor- 
able 

J. Curtis Lewis^ Jr.^ The Hon- 
orable 

Mr. Joe A. Webster^ Jr. 

Mr. Franklin Fr-^zier 



ADMINISTRATION 



Officers of Adniinislration 



Henry L. Ashmore 
Joseph I. Killorin 
James T. Rogers 
Donald D. Anderson. 
Jack H. Padgett 
Jule C. Rossiter 



President 

Dean of the College 

Dean of Student Affairs 

.Associate Dean for Community Services 

Registrar and Admissions Officer 

Comptroller 



Mrs. Martha DeWitt. 
Mrs. Mary H. Strong 

Mrs. Virginia M. Arey 



Director of Financial Aid 

Assistant to the Associate Dean 
for Community Services 

. Assistant to the Registrar in 
Charge of Admissions 



Heads of 

Leslie B. Davenport^ Jr. 
Orange W. Hall 

Fretwell G. Crider 

William W. Stokes 

James Harry Persse. 

Roy Carroll... 

Hugh Pendexter^ III 
F. Lane Hardy. 
Doris Bates 

Roy J. Sims. 

Robert H. Cormack 
Regina Yoast 



Departments 



Biology 

Business Administration 

Chemistry and Physics 

Education 

Fine Arts 

History and Political Science 

Language and Literature 

Mathematics 

Nursing 

Physical Education 

Psychology and Sociology 

Library 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Administrative Staff 



Miss Marjorie A. Mosley 
Mrs. Elizabeth H. Carter 
Mrs. Peggy B. Strong 

Mrs. M.\gali R. Overman 

Mrs. Virginia D. Nall 
Mrs. Susan Coomer 
Mrs. Bertis Jones 
Mrs. Joyce Weld^ 
Mrs. Josephine Edwards. 
Mrs. Eugenia Edwards 
Mrs. Eleanor Salter 
Mrs. Corinne H. MgGee 
Mrs. Betty De Young 
Mrs. Zeanna Henley 
Richard F. Baker 

Ira Ryan 

Thomas Nease 
Mrs. Anne Nease 
Miss Elizabeth Pound 
Mrs. Launa Johns 
William E. Brown 



Secretary to the President 

Secretary to the Dean of the College 

Secretary to the Faculty^ 
Gamble Building 

Secretary to the Faculty 
Science Building 

Secretary to Dean of Student Affairs 

. Secretary to the Registrar 

l.B.M. Operator 

Secretary to Registrar for Records 

Catalogue Assistant 

Circulation Assistant 

Secretary to the Librarian 

Assistant to the Comptroller 

Secretary to the Comptroller 

Cashier 

Superintendent, Buildings 
and Grounds 

Assistant Superintendent J 
Buildings and Grounds 

Manager, Student Center 

Campus Nurse 

Manager, Book Store 

Receptionist, PBX Operator 

Supervisor of Mail 



ADMINISTRATION 



THE FACULTY 

M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B., M.A., Baylor University 
Professor of English 

Donald D. Anderson, B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.A., George 
Peabody College; Ed. 1)., Auburn University 

Associate Deaii for Cormnunity Services 

Ruth Arger, B.A., Oglethorpe University; M.A., University of 
Tennessee 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Betty J. Ashbrook, B.S., Western Carolina College; M.S., Clemson 
College 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Henry L. Ashmore, B.A.E., M.A.E., D.Ed., University of Florida 

President 

Jan Barker, B.A., M.A., University of Virginia 
Assistant Professor of English 

Doris W. Bates, B.S., Simmons College; M.S., Boston University 

Director of the Department of Nursing 
Associate Professor of Nursing 

George H. Bedw^ell, B.S., Sanford University; M.A., University of 
Alabama 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., University 
of Georgia 

Professor of History 

Sarvan K. Bhatia, B.A., M.A., Punjab University; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University 

Professor of Economics 

Rose Marie Blase, B.S. in Nursing, Mt. St. Agnes College; M.S., 
University of Maryland 

Instructor in Nursing 

S. Kent Brooks, B.A., M.A., The University of Texas 
Assistant Professor of English 

*John H. Brower, B.S., University of Maine; M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Massachusetts 

Part-time Professor of Biology 

Virginia Carr, B.A., Florida State University; M.A., University of 
North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of English 

♦Part-time Instructor. 



10 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Roy Carroll, B.A., Ouachita Baptist College; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt 
University 

Head, Department of History and Political Science 
Professor of History 

Frank Chew, B.A., Georgia Southern College; M.F.A., The Univer- 
sity of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of English 
Director, ''Masquers" 

Mary Dan Coleman, B.S., G.S.C.W.; M.A., George Peabody College 

Assistant Professor of Education 

Bernard J. Comaskey, B.A., Fordham College; M.A., New^ York 
University 

Assistant Professor of History 

Robert H. Cormack, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Head, Department of Psychology and Sociology 
Professor of Psychology 

William E. Coyle, A.B., Emory University; M.A., Georgetown Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Florida State University 

Associate Professor of History & Political Science 

Fretwell G. Crider, B.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
Head, Department of Chemistry and Physics 
Professor of Chemistry 

Emory S. Crosby, B.S., M.A., Western Kentucky State College; Ph.D., 
Clemson University 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Leslie B. Davenport, Jr., B.S., College of Charleston; M.S., Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Head, Department of Biology 
Professor of Biology 

John Kenneth Davidson, B.S., M.A., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Josephine F. Davidson, B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 
M.A., Florida State University 

Catalogue Librarian 

Lamar W. Davis, B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina; Certified 
Public Accountant 

Professor of Business Administration 

Martha DeWitt, A.B., Salem College; M.Ed., University of Virginia 
Director of Financial Aid 



ADMINISTRATION 11 

Rafael Sanchez-Diaz, B.S., University of Puerto Rico; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Texas; Ph.D., University of California 
Professor of Mathematics 

Nancy Duffy^ B.S., University of Iowa 

Instructor in Nursing 

John Donald Duncan, B.S., College of Charleston; M.A., University 
of South Carolina 

Assistant Professor of History 

*RossiTER C. DuRFEE, B.A., M.A., Stanford University 
Instructor in English 

William L. Easterling, B.S., Western Carolina College; M.A., Mid- 
dlebury College; Diploma, Sorbonne, France 

Temporary Assistant Professor of Languages 

Gary B. Ferguson^ B.A., Washington State University; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Washington 

Instructor in German 

*Julian R. Friedman, B.A., Emory University; LL.B., University of 
Georgia; LL.M., New York University 

Instructor in Business Administration 

^Margaret Geffken^ B.A., Misericordia College; M.A., Northwestern 
University 

Instructor in English 

Frederick C. Haas, B.B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Hofstra University 
Associate Professor of Business Administration 

Orange W. Hall, B.S., Air Force Institute of Technology; M.B.A., 
Hofstra College; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Head, Department of Business Administration 
Professor of Business Administration 

F. Lane Hardy, A.B., Oglethorpe University; M.A., Emory University; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Head, Department of Mathematics 
Professor of Mathematics 

Henry E. Harris, B.S., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Richard Haunton, A.B., A.M., Indiana University 
Associate Professor of History 

Josephine Hickman, B.S., M.A., University of Alabama 
Instructor in Physical Education 

♦Part-time Instructor. 



12 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Raymond L. Hill, B.S., United States Military Academy; B.S.C.E., 
University of Californiaj M.S., University of Florida 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

♦Bernard Hirshberg, A.B., A.M., University of Michigan 
Instructor in Anthropology 

*Philip Hoffman, B.B.A., M.B.A., University of Georgia; Certified 
Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Mark Daniel Horn, A.B., Loyola University; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana 
State University 

Visiting Professor of English 

Joseph L Killorin, A.B., St. John's College; ^LA.. Columbia Univer- 
sity 

Dean of the College 

* Arthur T. Kolgaklis, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; 
M.B.A., Harvard School of Business Administration 
Instructor in Business Administration 

Walter B. Laffer, B.S., Case Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University m 

Associate Professor of Mathematics \ 

OsMos Lanier, Jr., B.A., LaGrange College; M.A., Auburn Univer- 
sity: Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Associate Professor of History 

Margaret S. Lubs, B.Mus. Converse College; B.A., University of 
Georgia; M.A., Columbia University 

Professor of English and French i 

*Patrick Lum, B.A., Earlham College: M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Illinois 

Part Time Professor of Biology | 

John C. McCarthy, Jr., B.B.A., University of Miami; M.B.A., Uni- 
versity of Georgia ■ 
Assistant Professor of Business Administration I 

*Elmo M. McCr.\y, Jr., B.S., M.S., University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

Kenneth P. McKinnell, B.F.A., M.F.A., The LTnivei-sity of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Art 



•Part-time Instructor. 



ADMlNISTKA'llON 13 

*C!iiARLKS A. McMiRRAV, JR., 15. S., I liijjh Point College; M.A., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

Instructor in Chemistry 

*Francis L. Mannion, Jr., B.I.E., University of Florida 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Anne Mayer^ B.S., M.A., Columbia University 
Instructor in Nursing 

♦John M. Parr, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instructor in En"ineerin^ and Mathematics 

Robert L. Patterson, B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan College; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky 

Assistant Professor of History 

Jack H. Padgett, A.B., Wofford College; M.A., University of North 
Carolina 

Registrar 

Hugh Pendexter, III, A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., Northw^estem 
University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Head, Department of Language and Literature 
Professor of English 

James H. Persse, B.F.A., University of Georgia; M.M., D.Mus., 

Florida State University 

Head, Department of Fine Arts 
Professor of Music 

Dale Price, B.A., Florida State University; M.A., Florida State Uni- 
versity 

Director, Student Activities 

Virginia Ramsey, A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A.T., Emory Uni- 
versity 

Assistant Professor of English 

Jai Bong Ro, B.A., Seoul National University (Korea) 
Assistant Professor of Political Science 

Paul E. Robbins, B.S., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Georgia 
Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 



♦Part-time Instructor. 



14 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

James T. Rogers, B.S., Delta State College; M.R.E., New Orleans 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Florida State University 
Dean of Student Affairs 

JuLE C. RossiTER, A. A., Armstrong State College 

Comptroller 

Barbara Rundbaken, B.S., Michigan State University 
Instructor in Nursing 

Lea Leslie Seale, B.A., Univ^ersity of Southwestern Louisiana; M.A., 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Professor of English 

James L. Semmes, B.S. United States Naval Academy; M. S., Florida 
State University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics i 

*DoN L. Silhacek, B.Sc.j M.Sc, University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin 

Part-time Professor of Chemistry 

Roy J. Sims, B.S., David Lipscomb College; M.S., University of 
Tennessee 

Head, Department of Physical Education 

Professor of Physical Education 

Baseball Coach 

William W. Stokes, B.A.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Florida 

Head, Department of Education 

Professor of Education 

Cedric Stratton, B.Sc, Nottingham University, England; Ph.D., 
Birkbeck College, London, England 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Mary H. Strong, A.B., University of West Virginia 
Director, Community Services 

Robert L Strozier, A.B., University of Georgia; M.A., Ph.D., Florida 
State University 

Professor of English 

Robert T. Stubbs, B.S., M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Professor of Mathematics 

Lawrence M. Tapp, B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
Basketball Coach 



•Part-time Instructor. 



ADMINISTRATION 15 



Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B., Monmouth College; M. A., North- 
western University; Certificate in Psychiatric Social Work, West- 
ern Reserve Uni\ersity 

Professor of Psychology 

Francis M. Thorne, III, B.S., Stetson University; Ph.D., University 
of Georgia 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Marion Trentiiam, A.B., University of Georgia; B.S. in Library 
Science, University of North Carolina 

Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Dale J. Underwood, B.A., M.A., The University of Florida 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Jean W. Vining, B.S., University of Georgia; M.Ed., Georgia South- 
ern College 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

Elizabeth L. Waffle, B.A., Cornell College; M.S., Iowa State Uni- 
versity 

Associate Professor of Biology 

John A. Welsh, III., A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity 

Assistant Professor of English 

*Margie p. Westfall, A.B., A.M., University of Illinois 
Instructor in French 

Charles C. White, B.S., East Carolina College; M.A., Southern 
Illinois University 

Associate Professor of English 

Sybil Wilson, B.S. in N.Ed., The University of Georgia 
Instructor in Nursing 

William S. Winn, B.D., A.B., Emory University; M.A., University of 
North Carolina 

Professor of Mathematics 

K. C. Wu, B.A., Grinnell College; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 
Professor of History and Political Science 

Regina Yoast, B.A., Texas Christian University; B. S. in Library 
Science, Columbia University 

Librarian 



♦Part-time Instructor. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Armstrong Stale College : 
Purposes and Programs 

A college is primarily a community of teachers and students who 
organize their energies for the work of the mind. Success in college 
means that a student has acquired those liberating skills of the mind 
that enable a man or woman to live the most fruitful life possible 
for him or her; that he has discovered the usefulness of those skills for 
understanding the world and for living in it competently and con- 
scientiously. 

Armstrong State College attempts to provide a climate where the 
student is induced to make connections between what he thinks and 
does and the best that has been thought and done. It is a climate 
intending to nourish the judging, critical and free man, responsible 
to himself and to his fellow man because he is developing and testing 
his own ideas and values. 

Here the student works under able teachers to acquire liberal arts, 
and with their aid to explore man and his world through the insights 
of the humanities, the natural sciences and the social sciences. These 
studies are the core of every four year degree program. 

In addition, the complex professional resources of the college make 
it the center for professional programs, such as those in elementary- 
and secondary education, nursing, and business, which require a sound 
academic training as \vell as the development of professional skills. 
The college is the natural center for the creation of numerous pro- 
grams, often through short non-credit courses and institutes, which 
apply the college's resources to the many problems arising in a large 
urban community. In this sense, the educational role of the college 
is truly multi-purpose. 

FOUR- YEAR DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of history, English, and music. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, chemistry, and 
mathematics. 

Bachelor of Business Administration in the fields of accounting, 
management, and economics. 

(Each of these above degrees may be taken along with an approved 
program leading to certification for secondary school teaching.) 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 



\ 



GENERAL INFORMAllON 17 

TWO YEAR DEGREES 

The Associate in Arts Degree is offered as preparation for higher 
degrees in the liberal arts and the professions, and for positions in 
business after two years of college. 

The Associate in Arts Degree in Nursing prepares graduates foi 
the State Examination for licensure as registered nurses. 

The student planning to transfer from Armstrong State College 
into a professional or academic major program not offered here should, 
at the beginning of his freshman year, consult the catalogue require- 
ments of the school he plans to attend. Armstrong State College of- 
fers the first year of programs in forestry and veterinary medicine ; the 
first two years of programs in engineering, industrial management, 
physical education, physics, pharmacy; the first three years, or the 
entire pre-professional programs, in dentistry, law, medicine, optometry, 
and other fields. 

History of the College 

Armstrong State College was founded on May 27, 1935, as Arm- 
strong Junior College, by the Mayor and Alderman of the City of 
Savannah to meet a long felt need for a college in the community. 
The College was housed in the Armstrong Building, a gift to the city 
from the family of George F. Armstrong, and over the years built 
or acquired five more buildings in the neighborhood of Forsyth Park 
and Monterey Square. 

The College, as Armstrong College of Savannah, became a two- 
year unit of the University System of Georgia on January 1, 1959, 
under the control of the Regents of the University System. 

In 1962, the Mills Bee Lane Foundation purchased a new campus 
site of over 200 acres, selected by the Regents. The new campus, with 
seven new buildings, was occupied in December, 1965. 

In 1964, the Regents conferred upon Armstrong the status of a 
four-year college, with the right to offer the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Business Administration. 
The first degrees will be conferred in June, 1968. The College now 
offers ten major programs leading to these degrees, and, in addition, 
the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education, Bachelor 
of Science in Medical Technology, and the two year Associate in Arts 
Degree in Nursing. 

The College community includes about 1600 students and 65 
full-time faculty members. 

Armstrong State College retained its accreditation as a junior 
college by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools when it 



18 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

became a four-year college. It is now in the process of following the 
procedure required by the Association for accreditation as a senior 
institution. Armstrong State College expects to be accredited as a 
senior institution in the fall of 1968 with accreditation retroactive to 
January 1, 1968. 

Library 

The Lane Library is a modem two-story building completed in 
the winter of 1965. The building is completely air conditioned and 
fully carpeted. The library is equipped with well-designed furniture 
of the highest quality. A reading room and individual carrel desks 
are available on both floors. There is an attractively furnished periodi- 
cal and newspaper room on the first floor. Faculty carrels, group 
study rooms, a seminar room and a staff-faculty room are available 
on the second floor. All stacks are open. 

The library's collection is comprised of books, periodicals, pamph- 
lets, documents, newspapers, maps, microfilm, microcards, and other 
materials. Cataloged volumes in the library total approximately 35,000. 

The periodicals subscription list of 375 titles is well balanced 
and carefully chosen to meet the requirements of students and faculty. 

A microfilm reader-printer, a microcard reader and a copying 
machine are available in the library for faculty and students use. 

Services and regulations are specified in the library handbook, 
available on request to the Librarian of the college. 

Evening Classes 

In addition to the full daytime schedule, Armstrong offers a 
schedule of classes in the evening, including most of the required 
courses for many programs leading towards a degree. 

Students employed during the day must limit their enrollment 
to one or two courses each quarter. 

Office of Community Services 

Short Courses, Workshops and Institutes. These are planned, 
organized and administered by the office in response to group inter- 
est, or to meet a community need brouglit to the attention of the 
Dean. All are offered on a non-credit basis and, except in a very 
few cases, there are no special requirements or prerequisites for ad- 
mission. A separate bulletin describing all credit and non-credit evening 
classes is published each summer. An additional brochure of the non- 
credit courses and special events, under the heading of "The Seven- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 19 

Thirty Scries" is mailed out before the beglnninfr of every ciuarter; 
anyone wishing to do so may have his name placed on this mailing list. 
Subjects covered vaiy widely; the series is designed to offer something 
to appeal to almost any adult taste, from Computer Programming to a 
sui-vey of the leading religions of the United States. The Dean is 
always glad to arrange courses for candidates preparing to take pro- 
fessional examinations in engineering, insurance, real estate and many 
others; the college has been approved as an Examination Center for 
a number of these examinations. One-day workshops, such as the 
annual \Vriters' Workshop, are also planned and managed by this 
office. 



20 ARMSTRONG STAIE COLLEGE 



ADMISSIONS 



Application forms for admission to Armstrong State College are 
provided by the Admission Officer upon request. An application can- 
not be considered until all required fonns are properly executed and 
returned to the Admissions Office. Applications must be on file in the 
Admissions Office at least twenty days before the opening of the 
quarter in which the applicant wishes to enter. Deadlines for sub- 
mitting applications for the 1967-68 session are: 

For Summer Quarter, 1967 — May 22 (New freshmen and trans- 
fers) 

May 31 (Transient students — 
Summer only) 

For Fall Quarter, 1967 —September 1 

For Winter Quarter, 1968 — December 12 

For Spring Quarter, 1968 — March 1 

For Summer Quarter, 1968 — May 20 (New freshmen and trans- 
fers) 

June 3 (Transient students — 
Summer only) 

For Fall Quarter, 1968 — September 1 

The applicant must be at least sixteen years old on or before 
registration date and must give evidence of good moral character, 
promise of growth and development, seriousness of purpose, and a 
sense of social responsibility. Armstrong State College reserves the 
right to examine and appraise the character, the personality, and the 
physical fitness of the applicant. The College further reserv^es the 
right to examine any applicant by the use of psychological, achieve- 
ment, and aptitude tests and to require additional biographical data 
and an interview before the applicant is accepted or rejected. If an 
interview is required, the applicant will be notified. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to refuse to accept 
any or all of the credits from any high school or other institution, 
notwithstanding its accredited status, when the College determines 
through investigation or otherwise that the quality of instruction at 
such high school or other institution is for any reason deficient or 
unsatisfactory. The judgment of the College on this question shall be 
final. 

The Admissions Officer may refer any applicant to the Admis- 
sions Committee of the College for study and advice. The ultimate 
decision as to whether an applicant shall be accepted or rejected shall 
be made by the Admissions Officer subject to the applicant's right of 
appeal as provided in the policies of the Board of Regents of the Uni- 
versity System. 



ADMISSION 21 



The Admissions Officer shall, as promptly as practicable, inform 
tlie applicant of the action taken upon his application. 

I'he College reserves the right to terminate acceptance of appli- 
cations when enrollment caj:)acity is reached. The College further 
reser\es the right to reject an applicant who is not a resident of the 
State of Georgia. 

All students enrolled at Armstrong State College are required to 
sign the Honor Pledge at the time of their initial registration. For a 
detailed explanation of the Honor System see the REGULATIONS sec- 
tion of this catalogue. 

Specific requirements for admission are discussed below. 

Requirements for Freshman Applicants 

1. Certificate of graduation from an accredited high school (or 
successful completion of the General Educational Development Test 
[GED] with no score less than 45). 

2. A transcript of the applicant's high school record to be sub- 
mitted by the high school directly to the College. 

3. A minimum of sixteen units of high school credit, including 
the following specific subjects: 

English — 4 units 

Mathematics — 2 units (One unit must be in algebra, al- 
though two units of algebra are desirable. For students 
entering the engineering or scientific fields, two units of 
algebra and one of geometry are needed.) 

Science — 2 units 

Social Studies — 2 units 

Other units sufficient to graduate. 

4. Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the 
College Entrance Examination Board. Official results of this test must 
be filed with the Admissions Office by the final date for submitting 
application for the quarter in which the student wishes to enroll. 

The Scholastic Aptitude Test is given in all states and numerous 
foreign countries in December, January, March, May, and July, and 
in nine states, including Georgia, in November. Students wishing to 
make application to take the test may secure application forms from 
their secondary school principal or counselor, or by writing directly 
to the College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, New 
Jersey 08540, or Box 1025, Berkeley, California 94701, for an applica- 
tion form and the Bulletin of Information which is available without 
charge. Applicants who wish to enroll at the beginning of the Winter 



22 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Quarter should lake the Scholastic Aptitude Test in November. The 
deadline for filing application for the test which will be given on 
November 4, 1967, is October 7, 1967 (or October 21, 1967, upon 
payment of a late registration fee). 

5. Application fee of $10 which must accompany the applica- 
tion form. This fee does not bind Armstrong State College to admit 
the applicant nor does it indicate acceptance of the applicant's quali- 
cations. The fee will not be credited toward the matriculation fee 
in the event that the applicant is accepted as a student and it will 
not be refunded in the event that the applicant does not enroll as a 
student. An applicant who fails to enroll in the quarter for which 
he is accepted must reapply for admission if he wishes to enter the 
institution at a later time by resubmission of fee by the date specified. 

6. Emergency Surgery or Medication Permit signed by the 
parents of a student (or the student himself is over 21 years of age) 
must be returned prior to admission either authorizing or not author- 
izing the College to take whatever action is deemed necessary in the 
case of an emergency until the parents' can be reached. 

7. Physical examinations prior to admission are required for 
all entering students with the exception of the following : Evening stu- 
dents, special students, transient students, and auditors. 

On the basis of his achievement as reflected bv his his:h school 
grades and on his potential ability as shown by his scores on the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test, an evaluation of each applicant's readiness to 
undertake college work will be made. 



Advanced Placement 

Armstrong State College gives advanced placement, or in some 
cases college credit, for college level high school courses, on the basis 
of the high school teacher's recommendation, the student's grade on 
the Advanced Placement Examination of the CEEB, and approval 
by the appropriate department chairman of Armstrong State College. 



Requirements for Transfer Applicants 

1. Transfer applicants will follow the same procedures as fresh- 
man applicants, except that transfer apphcants who will have achieved 
sophomore standing at the time of their entrance will not be required 
to submit their high school records. Such records may be required 
by the Admissions Office but normally the transcripts of previous 
college records will suffice in place of the high school record. A 



ADMISSION 23 



transfer applicant must ask the Rec^istrar of each college he has 
previously attended to mail an official transcript of his record to the 
Admissions Office at Annstrong State College, regardless of the trans- 
ferability of tlie credits. 

2. Transfer applicants with less than sophomore standing (less 
than 45 quarter hours completed) must meet entrance requirements 
of both freshman and transfer applicants and will be required to sub- 
mit their high school records as well as transcripts of college records. 

3. A transfer applicant will not be eligible for admission to 
Armstrong State College unless he is eligible to return to the last 
college attended on the date he expects to enter Armstrong. A student 
who is on suspension from another college because of poor scholarship 
or disciplinary reasons will not be eligible for admission. 

4. A transfer applicant will be considered for admission to Arm- 
strong State College if, on all work attempted at other institutions, 
his academic performance as shown by his grade point average is 
equivalent to the minimum standard required of Armstrong State 
College students of comparable standing. (See chart under Academic 
Probation and Dismissal Policy on page 45.) 

5. Credit will be given for transfer work in which the student 
received a grade of "D" or above with the percentage of "D" and 
"D + " grades not to exceed twenty (20) per cent of the total hours 
being transferred. College credit will not be allowed for such courses 
as remedial English and remedial mathematics or courses basically of 
secondary school level. 

6. Credits earned at an institution which is not a member of 
the appropriate regional accrediting agency can be accepted on a 
provisional basis only. A student transferring from an institution which 
is not a member of the regional accrediting agency must achieve a 
"C" average on his first fifteen quarter hours of work at Armstrong 
in order to be eligible to continue. His transfer credits would then 
be evaluated in certain areas by examination. 

7. The amount of credit that Armstrong will allow for work 
done in another institution within a given period of time may not 
exceed the normal amount of credit that could have been earned 
at Armstrong during that time. A maximum of 100 quarter hours 
may be transferred from a junior college. For a bachelor's degree, 
90 quarter hours of junior and senior level work will be required 
(except in certain approved programs in mathematics, the natural 
sciences, and music), of which the last 45 quarter hours in courses 
numbered 200 and above must be taken at Armstrong. At least half 
of the courses offered in the major field must be taken at Armstrong. 

8. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a 
degree may be taken by correspondence or extension courses. No 



24 ARMSTRONG Sl'ATE COLLEGE 

correspondence courses may be used to meet requirements in the 
major field or the related field for the bachelor's degree. No cor- 
respondence courses may be taken while a student is enrolled at 
Armstrong State College. Correspondence credit will not be accepted 
for courses in English composition or foreign language. 

Special Students 

Applicants who possess a bachelor's degree or its equivalent and 
who wish to take courses for personal enrichment or advancement 
may be admitted as special students. Such an applicant will submit 
the application form and fee and will have official transcripts of his 
college records mailed to the Admissions Office by the final date for 
submitting applications for the quarter in which he wishes to enroll. 

Auditors 

Armstrong State College grants to certain persons who are not 
regularly admitted students special permission to audit courses. Such 
applicants will not be required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
given by the CEEB but must meet all other requirements for admis- 
sion and pay regular fees. A special form for permission to audit 
courses may be obtained from the Admissions Office. 

Readmission of Former Students 

A student who has not been enrolled at Armstrong for one or 
more quarters must apply for readmission on a fonn provided by 
the Admissions Office. A former student who has not attended an- 
other college since leaving Armstrong may be readmitted provided 
he is not on suspension at the time he wishes to re-enter, A former 
student who has attended another college since leaving Armstrong 
must meet requirements for readmission as a transfer student or as 
a transient student, whichever is applicable. A student who is re- 
admitted after an absence from the College for more than two years 
must meet degree requirements as listed in the catalogue in effect 
at the time of his retiun. 

Transient Students 

Transient student status means that a student is admitted to 
Armstrong State College only for a specified period of time, normally 
a summer quarter, with the understanding that he is to return to 
his own college for the next quarter. An applicant for transient 
status must file a regular application form and submit a statement 
from his Dean or Registrar that he is in 2:ood standing and has 
permission to take specific courses at Armstrong to be transferred to 



ADMISSION 25 



his own institution when satisfactorily completed. Since transient 
students are not admitted as regular Armstrong students, transcripts 
of college work completed elsewhere are not usually required of such 
applicants. A transient student who wishes to remain at Aniistrong 
longer than one quarter must suhmit an additional statement from 
his Dean or Registrar or he must meet all requirements for regular 
admission as a transfer student. 

Armstrong State College/High School 
Accelerated Program 

This program marks a new venture for this community in which 
college and high school join to challenge intellectually able young 
men and women to test their interests and their capacity to learn. 

The Program 

High school students who have completed the eleventh grade, 
who have met the criteria for admission to this program and who 
maintain its standards will be permitted to enroll in one course each 
quarter at Armstrong State College while they complete the senior 
year of high school. Upon graduation from high school, these stu- 
dents will be admitted upon application as regular students of the 
College and will be given full college credit for the courses taken at 
Armstrong. 

Through this program, a student may complete over two-thirds 
of the freshman year of college before he begins his regular college 
career. 

The maximum number of college courses possible is: 

Summer 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Fall 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Winter 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Spring 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 
Summer (following high school 

graduation and admission to 

Armstrong) 3 courses (15 qtr. hours) 

7 courses (35 qtr. hours) 

The College Courses 

Every student accepted in this program must take a course in 
English or mathematics first. Thereafter he may choose any freshman 
course, with peiTnission of his college adviser. 

Criteria of Admission 

The College will consider a student for this program only upon 
written recommendation of his high school principal. In the view of 



26 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

the College, it is only the principal who can judge the circumstances 
that may make the program valuable and practicable for any student. 

To be admitted to the program a student must satisfy all of these 
criteria : 

L written recommendation by the Principal of the high school; 

2. completion of the eleventh grade in an accredited high school; 

3. a combined verbal and math score of 1000 on CEEB tests; 

4. an average grade of B or better in academic subjects (Eng- 
lish, mathematics, science, social studies, languages) through 
the ninth, tenth and eleventh grades as averaged by the Arm- 
strong State College Admissions Officer. 

5. written permission of the parents. 

Standards 

A student forfeits the privilege of this program if in any quarter 
his grade in the college course is below C or his high school average 
in academic courses is below B. 

Procedure for Admission 

A high school principal may recommend students following the 
fifth six-week period of the students' eleventh year. The recom- 
mendation to the College must be made by May 15th if the student 
intends to begin in the summer. The principal may recommend 
following the full eleventh year by August 15th if the student intends 
to begin in the fall. 

Foreign Students 

A student from a countiy other than the United States who is 
interested in attending Armstrong must meet the following require- 
ments before application is made: 

1. He must have met the requirements of paragraph 3, under 
REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMAN APPLICANTS, in 
regard to units in the subjects required at Armstrong. 

2. He must have an official transcript of his academic record 
mailed to the Admissions Office at Armstrong with an offi- 
cial translation. 

3. He should take the SAT of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board in the testing center nearest his home and ask 
that the results be sent to Armstrong. 

If the applicant meets the academic requirements for admission, 
he will be sent an application form. After it has been returned and 



I 



ADMISSION 27 



appro\cd, the applicant will be sent an 1-20 Form (I-20A and 
I-lOB), which he can then lake to the American Consul to ask for a 
student visa. 

Armstrong is a community college and has no dormitory or 
boarding facilities, so these must be arranged by any student who 
does not live in Savannah. 

No scholarships are available for students who are not legal resi- 
dents of Georgia. All foreign students must pay non-resident fees. 



Admission of Veterans 

After having been accepted at Armstrong State College and upon 
receipt of Certification of Eligibility and Entitlement from the Veterans 
Administration, veterans may attend under Public Law 358 (Veterans 
Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966), Public Law 815 (disabled), 
Public Law 894 (disabled), Public Law 634 (war orphans), or Public 
Law 361 (children of permanently disabled veterans). Students under 
Public Law 358, 361, or 634 should be prepared to pay tuition and fees 
at the time of registration. 

Applicants Sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or other 
commimity agencies must apply at least six (6) weeks before the 
beginning of any quarter to insure proper processing of application. 



Financial Aid 

(See STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES section of this 
Bulletin for further information.) 



Registration and Orientation 

Prior to the Fall Quarter a period of orientation is set aside 
to assist new students in becoming acquainted with the College, its 
curriculum, extra-curricular activities, student leaders, counselors, 
members of the faculty and the administration. Complete instruc- 
tions concerning registration are made available to all students at 
the beginning of the registration period. Registration includes coun- 
selmg, academic advisement, selection of courses, enrollment in 
classes, and payment of fees. Full details regarding orientation and 
registration are provided to all incoming students during the summer 
preceding their initial enrollment. 



28 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Residency Requirements of the Board of Regents 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, the applicant must 
establish the following facts to the satisfaction of the Admissions 
Officer: 

1. A student who is under 21 years of age at the time he seeks 
to register or re-register at the beginning of any quarter will 
be accepted as a resident student only upon a showing by him 
that his supporting parent or guardian has been legally domi- 
ciled in Georgia for a period of at least twelve months im- 
mediately preceding the date of registration or re-registration. 

2. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as 
guardian of a non-resident minor, such minor will not be per- 
mitted to register as a resident student until the expiration 
of one year from the date of appointment, and then only 
upon proper showing that such appointment was not made to 
avoid payment of the non-resident fee. 

3. If a student is over 21 years of age, he may register as a 
resident student only upon a showing that he has been domi- 
ciled in Georgia for at least twelve months prior to the regis- 
tration date. 

Any period of time during which a person is enrolled as a 
student in any educational institution in Georgia may not be 
counted as a part of the twelve months' domicile and residence 
herein required when it appears that the student came into 
the State and remained in the State for the primary purpose 
of attending a school or college. 

4. A full-time faculty member in an institution of the University 
System, his wife, and minor children may register for courses 
on the payment of residence fees, even though the facult) 
member has not been in residence in Georgia for a period of 
twelve months. 

5. If the parents or legal guardian of a minor change residence 
to another state following a period of residence in Georgia, 
the minor may continue to take courses for a period of twelve 
consecutive months on the payment of resident fees. After the 
expiration of the twelve months' period the student may con- 
tinue his registration only upon the pa^nnent of fees at the 
non-resident rate. 

6. Military personnel stationed in Georgia, and their dependents, 
may become eligible to enroll in institutions of the University 
System as resident students provided they file with the insti- 
tution in which they wish to enroll the following materials: 



ADMISSION 29 



a. A statement from the appropriate military official as to the 

applicant's ''home of record"; 
h. E\idence that applicant, if over 21 years of age, is eligible 

to vote in Georgia; 
I. E\idence that applicant, if under 21 years of age, is the 

child of parents who are eligible to vote in Georgia; 

d. E\ idence that applicant, or his parents filed an income 
tax return in Georgia during the preceding year; 

e. Other evidence showing that a legal domicile has been 
established in Georgia. 

7. All aliens shall be classified as non-resident students; pro- 
\ided, however, that an alien who is living in this country 
under a visa permitting permanent residence or who has filed 
with the proper federal immigration authorities a Declaration 
of Intention to become a citizen of the United States shall 
have the same privilege of qualifying for resident status for 
fee purposes as has a citizen of the United States. 

8. Teachers in the public schools of Georgia and their depend- 
ents may enroll as students in University System institutions 
on payment of resident fees, when it appears that such teach- 
ers have resided in Georgia for nine months, that they were 
engaged in teaching during this nine months' period, and that 
they have been employed to teach in Georgia during the en- 
suing school year. 

9. In the event that a woman who is a resident of Georgia and 
who is a student in an institution of the University System 
marries a non-resident of the State, the woman will continue 
to be eligible to attend the institution on payment of resident 
fees, provided that her enrollment is continuous. 

10. If a woman who is not a resident of Georgia marries a man 
who is a resident of Georgia, the woman will not be eligible 
to register as a resident student in a University System insti- 
tution until she has been domiciled in the State of Georgia for 
a period of twelve months immediately preceding the date 
of registration. 



Admission to the Associate of Arts Degree 
Program in Nursing 



Nursing calls for a variety of skills and aptitudes and offers 
unlimited opportunities for different kinds of service. Therefore, a 



30 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

candidate for the nursing program should have good physical and 
mental health as well as those personal qualifications appropriate 
for nursing. For these reasons the Admissions Committee selects stu- 
dents whose abilitieSj interests, and personal qualities show promise 
of success in the program and in the field of nursing. Factors influ- 
encing the decision of the Admissions Committee are: achievement 
as shown on the secondary school record, ability as measured by the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test, motivation for nursing, health, personal 
qualities, and social adjustment. Applicants who, in the judgment 
of the Admissions Committee, present high overall qualifications are 
selected. 

The preferred age for applicants, married or single, at the time 
of entrance is 18. The upper age limit is 40 years. Applicants who 
have not reached their 18th birthday but who can show evidence that 
they will reach their 20th birthday by the date they are scheduled 
to complete the program will be considered. The State of Georgia 
requires, as do most other states, United States citizenship, either 
natural born or naturalized, for registered nurse licensure. Candidates 
for admission to the nursing program who are not citizens may be 
admitted only under certain circumstances and should make indi- 
vidual inquiries. 

How to Apply 

1. Complete the application form for admission to Armstrong 
State College and return it with the non-refundable $10 
application fee. Mark the application For Nursing Only. 

2. Complete the Personal Data Sheet for the Department of 
Nursing. 

3. Have the medical form completed by a licensed physician. 

4. Have the dental form completed by a dentist. 

5. Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College En- 
trance Examination Board, preferably in December or January. 
When applying for the test be certain to list Armstrong State 
College as one college to receive your scores. 

6. Have a transcript of your high school record mailed from 
the high school directly to the Admissions Office at Arm- 
strong. (A transfer student should also ask the Registrar of 
each school or college she (he) has previously attended to 
mail an official transcript of her (his) record to the Admis- 
sions Office at Armstrong, regardless of the transferability 
of the credits. 



I 



I 



ADMISSION 31 



7 Send or have sent, two written letters of refcrcnec directly 
to the Admissions Office from non-family members (teachers, 
employers, or other qualified persons) who have known you 
for at least three years. 

8. Send or have sent to the Admissions Office a certified copy 
of your birth certificate. 

Since applications are processed as received, applicants are en- 
couraged to apply as early as the senior year of high school. Applica- 
tion forms are available from the Admissions Officer at the College. 

Other Information 

It is recommended that applicants who have been aw^ay from 
school for a considerable period of time enroll in at least one course 
in an accredited college of their choice during the school year or 
summer preceding their planned entrance to the nursing program. 

Except in unusual circumstances, no credit will be given for 
nursing courses taken in another school of nursing. 

An applicant on academic suspension or probation from another 
college will not be considered. 

Nursing students are responsible for providing their own trans- 
portation to and from campus to the clinical area. (i.e. community 
hospitals and other health agencies). 

Armstrong State College does not provide student housing. It is 
necessary for students whose homes are not located in Savannah to 
make private arrangements for living accommodations. The responsi- 
bility for procuring suitable housing rests with the student and her/ 
his parents. (For the 1967-68 class, local hospitals are making avail- 
able room and board scholarships to deserving unmarried women 
students in the nursing program. For further information, contact 
the Office of Student Personnel, Armstrong State College.) 

Students are required to wear the official student uniform of the 
Department of Nursing. Uniforms will be ordered during the Winter 
Quarter and may be purchased at the College Bookstore. 

Fees for a nursing student will be the same as for any other 
student at Armstrong. Please refer to the Fee Section of the current 
Bulletin. 

Nursing students are admitted once each year in the fall. Seven 
or eight consecutive quarters of full-time study are required for 
completion of the program. 



32 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



All nursing courses must be taken in sequence. Each nursing 
course has a prerequisite beginning with Fundamentals of Nursing. 

Students accepted for the nursing program will be sent informa- 
tion on supplies and equipment needed for the Fall Quarter approxi- 
mately two weeks before the opening of school with approximate 
charges. 

Admission into Armstrong State College does not in any way 
guarantee formal admission into the Department of Nursing. This 
will be accomplished after one quarter in the nursing program in 
which a "C" average (2.0) must be attained. 



I 



FEES 33 

FEES 

Application Fee 

The Application Fee of $10.00 is paid by all students at the 
time of initial application for admission to Armstrong State College. 
The acceptance of the Application Fee does not constitute acceptance 
of student, lliis fee is not refundable. 



Matriculation Fee 

The Matriculation Fee for students resristerins: for the normal 
course load of fifteen hours is $85,000. Students carrying less than 12 
credit hours in a quarter will pay at the rate of $7.00 per quarter 
hour in Matriculation Fee. 



Out of State Tuition 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $110.00 per quarter 
in addition to all regular fees. Students carrying less than 12 credit 
hours in a quarter who are not legal residents of the State of Georgia 
will pay at the rate of $9.00 per quarter hour Out-of-State Fee in 
addition to all regular fees. 

Student Activity Fee 

There will be a Student Activity Fee of $10.00 per quarter for 
students registering for a course load of ten or more quarter hours. 
Students carrying less than ten credit hours in a quarter will pay at 
the rate of $1.00 per quarter hour. This fee is not refundable. 

Late Registration Fee 

A late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged to students regis- 
tering on the date listed in the catalog as the date on which classes 
begin. A fee of $5.00 will be charged for registrations completed 
on the date listed in the catalog as the "last day to register for credit." 

Change of Schedule Fee 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the changing of a student's sched- 
ule after the registration cards have been processed. No charge is 
made if the change is initiated by the College. This fee is not re- 
fundable. 



34 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Graduation Fee 

A Graduation Fee for four-year programs of $10.00 will be 
collected from each candidate to cover all expenses including the 
rental of cap and gown and the cost of the diploma. The fee for 
Certificate for Associate in Arts Degree is $3.50, 



Transcript Fee 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college 
work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 each. 



Music Fees 

Students enrolled in Applied Music Courses will be required to 
pay a special fee in addition to the regular registration and matricu- 
lation fees. The fees are indicated in the description of courses found 
under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin and are not 
refundable. 



Make-up Test Fee 

For cause, a student may arrange with an instructor to make 
up an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to 
make up the announced test must be made within one week after the 
student returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the making up of any announced 
quiz and a fee of $5.00 for a make-up final examination and labora- 
tory examinations, except as shown below. The total charges to any 
one student for a final make-up examination in a given subject shall 
not exceed $5.00. All fees will be paid to the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final 
examinations will not be charged are as follows: The student was 
absent (1) on official college business; (2) due to illness; (3) because 
of death in the family; or (4) in observing religious holidays. 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from paying the 
fee must be presented in writing to the instructor. 



Short Courses 

Fees are announced for each course when the course is an- 
nounced. No refund can be made for withdrawal from a course. 






$ 85.00 
10.00 


$ 95.00 
110.00 



FEES 35 

Summary of Fees 

Matriculation, per quarter 
Student Activity, per quarter 

TOTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS 

Out of State Tuition, per quarter 

TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS $205.00 

Matriculation, Part-time Students, per quarter hour 7.00 

Student Activity Fee, Part-time Students, per quarter hour 1.00 
Non-Resident Tuition, Part-time Students, per quarter 

hour (in addition to Matriculation Fee) 9.00 

Privilege Fees 

Application Fee $ 10.00 

Late Registration — Maximum 5.00 

Special Examinations 2.00 

Final Examinations 5.00 

Graduation in four-year programs 10.00 

Associate in Arts Certificate 3.50 

Transcript, first one free, each additional 1.00 

Change of Schedule 2.00 

Refunds 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon written application for 
withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to students dropping 
a course. Students who formally withdraw during one week following 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 80% of 
the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw dur- 
ing the period between one and two weeks after the scheduled regis- 
tration date are entitled to a refund of 60% of the fees paid for that 
quarter. Students who formally withdraw between two and three 
weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund 
of 40% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally 
withdraw during the period between three and four weeks after the 
scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 20% of the 
fees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after a period of 
four weeks has elapsed from the scheduled registration date will be 
entitled to no refund of any part of the fees paid for that quarter. 

Fees and Charges are Subject to Change at the End of any Quarter 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 



36 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquency has been removed. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full at the time of regis- 
tration. 

If a check is not paid on presentation to the bank on which it is 
drawn, the student's registration will be cancelled and the student may 
re-register only on payment of a $5.00 service charge. 



I 






ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Honor System 

The Honor System at Armstrong State College provides all mem- 
bers of the student body with an opportunity to participate in self 
government. The accompanying responsibilities are outlined below. 

The Honor System, written by a joint committee of faculty and 
students, received an overwhelming endorsement by both faculty and 
students during the Winter Quarter, 1965. 

The ordinances of the Honor System are as follows: 

I. All students must agree to abide by the rules and regulations 
of the Honor System. A student will not be accepted at Arm- 
strong State College unless he signs the following statement 
at the time of his first registration: 

"I have read the regulations governing the Honor System at 
Armstrong State College, and I understand that as a student 
at Armstrong, I must comply with all of these requirements." 
This statement and all rules and regulations governing the 
Honor System will be printed in the official Bulletin and 
the Student Handbook. The statement will also be printed on 
the application form for admission to be signed by the student 
before admission to the college. 

It will be the responsibility of the Honor Council to con- 
duct an extensive orientation program at the beginning of 
each quarter for all newly entering students to explain fully 
the requirements of the Honor System and to allow full dis- 
cussion of these regulations. 

II. The following will be considered violations of the Honor Code: 

A. Academic dishonesty of any kind (giving or receiving any 
unauthorized help on any assignment, test or paper. At 
the beginning of each quarter it shall be the responsibility 
of each teacher to make clear what shall be considered 
unauthorized help in his course). 

B. Stealing only when related to cheating. 

C. Lying before the Honor Council. 

D. Failure to report a known offense. (Lying or stealing in 
any other cases will be considered disciplinary, not Honor, 
matters.) 



38 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Ul. Ways of reporting a violation of the Honor Code: 

A. Self-reporting: A student who has broken the Honor Code 
should report himself to a member of the Honor Council. 

B. Anyone (faculty member or student) who is aware of a 
violation of the Honor Code must report the matter. This 
may be done in one of two ways: 

1. He may tell the person thought to be guilty to report 
himself to a member of the Honor Council no later than 
the end of the next school day. After this designated 
time the person who is aware of the violation must 
inform a member of the Honor Council so that the 
Honor Council may contact the accused person if he 
has not already reported himself. 

2. He may report the suspected violation directly to a 
member of the Honor Council without informing the 
accused. 

1\'. The Honor Council will be composed of nine students. 

A. Selection shall be made by the President, Vice-President 
and Secretary of the Student Body, the President and 
Secretary of the Honor Council, together with three facul- 
ty members appointed by the President of the college. 
Selection shall be based on the following requirements: 

L High moral principles and unquestioned academic in- 
tegrity in all their relations to fellow students, faculty, 
and administrative officials. 

2. A minimum of C-j- for the preceding quarter and an 
over-all average of C-J-- 

Any student not in good standing with the college in 
academic or disciplinary matters is ineligible to serve on 
the Honor Council. 

Any member of the Honor Council who falls below these 
requirements will be ineligible to continue his term of 
service. A replacement will not be selected, however, un- 
less the total number of students on the Honor Council 
falls below seven. 

B. The selection committee shall submit a questionnaire to 
those students who meet these requirements. On the basis 
of the questionnaires the committee has the power to ap- 
point three seniors, three juniors, and three sophomores 
to serve on the Honor Council. At least three committee 



REGULATIONS 39 



niciiib(Ms shall be women and at least three shall be men. 
'i'his distribution may be altered when deemed best by the 
selection committee. The appointments shall be made bv 
the second Tuesday in March, and the Council shall assume 
its duties on April 1. 

C. The Honor Council shall elect one of its members to serve 
as President and one as Secretary. The President shall pre- 
side at all meetings and trials, and the Secretary shall 
maintain a written record of all proceedings. 

D. During summer school, any member of the Honor Council 
who is attending summer classes will serve on the Council 
for the summer together with other students appointed by 
the Council and the Dean of Student Affairs. 

V. The Honor Council shall formulate its own bylaws and pro- 
cedure. 

A. An Honor Council meeting shall be called by the President 
of the Council to examine a reported violation as soon 
as possible after such a report. When possible the meeting 
of the Council will be held within a week of the violation. 

B. At the meeting the Honor Council will hear the accusa- 
tion, the testimony of any witnesses, and any defense the 
accused may wish to present. 

C. The accused will have the right to hear all witnesses and 
all evidence brought before the Honor Council. 

D. Written notification of the specific charges which, if ap- 
proved, shall be made grounds for suspension or dismissal 
from a class. 

E. The accused will be considered innocent until proved 
guilty. 

T. Every trial shall be conducted by a Council of at least six 
members, including the President. In the absence of the 
President, the senior justice shall preside. 

G. The Secretary will keep minutes of all meetings. All offi- 
cial testimony will be tape recorded, provided that the re- 
cording devices are under the control of the Council. 

H. A vote of two-thirds majority of the members of the Honor 
Council present and voting will be necessary for the con- 
viction of the accused. The Council, in the event of a 
verdict of guilty, shall determine the penalty by majority 
vote. 



40 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

L The vote will be taken by secret ballot. 

VL Post-trial Procedure. 

A. Immediately upon conclusion of the trial, the accused shall 
I be notified of the findings and of the recommendation that 

1 ' the Council will make to the President of the college. 

R. If the accused is found innocent, he shall be notified of 
the finding and cautioned that the trial may be re-opened 
for good cause by the Council within a period of three 
weeks or at the request of the professor in whose course 
the alleged violation occurred. 

C. If a person is found guilty, the Honor Council will recom- 
mend to the President of Armstrong State College one of 
the following: 

' L Expulsion from the class and denial of credit in the 

course in which the violation occurred and denial of 
the position of any elective office. 

2. Suspension from school for any number of quarters 
(the minimum suspension will be for the remainder of 
the quarter in which the violation occurs.) 

3. Expulsion from school. 

In cases where the accused is found guilty, the Honor Council 
will report in writing their recommendations to the President 
of the College who will make the final decision. After the 
President of the College has decided on the action to be taken, 
he will inform, in writing, the accused, the professor of the 
class in which the violation occurred, and the accusor of his 
decision. The secretary of the Honor Council will then post 
an official notite on the bulletin boards announcing his action 
without mentioning the name of the accused. 

VII. Although the College feels that the above three recommenda- 
tions are appropriate for academic dishonesty, it also recog- 
nizes that unique circumstances may arise. For such cases a 
series of appeals is open to the convicted student. He may 
appeal either the conviction or the punishment or both in the 
following ways: 

A. To the President of Armstrong State College in a letter. 

B. The President's decision may be appealed to the Chancellor 

of the University System of Georgia in a letter. jl 

C. The Chancellor's decision may be appealed to the Board 
of Regents of the University System of Georgia in a letter. 



REGULATIONS 41 



VIII. Each student will he ii-(|iiircd to write on every written assign- 
ment, test, or papi-r a pledge^ that he has neither given nor 
received any unauthorized help on this work. This may be 
done by writing the word "Pledged" followed by the student's 
signature. 

IX. The Honor System is dependent upon student cooperation and 
support. It is felt that every student wishes the credit for his 
work to be unquestioned and the college he has chosen to be 
respected. 

X. A revision of the Honor System will require a majority vote 
of the faculty and of the student body. 

Academic Advisement 

Every student who enters Armstrong State College indicates at 
the time he applies for admission what major program he hopes to 
follow toward a degree, either at Armstrong or at another college. 

If the student has not yet decided upon a choice for his major 
program, he may attend several advising sessions during the orienta- 
tion period. In fact, it is not necessary in many major programs for 
the Bachelor of Arts degree to make a clear choice until the end of the 
sophomore year. If a student waits one or two years to choose a 
major program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree, he will 
probably find that he must take additional courses to meet gradua- 
tion requirements. For a student attempting to choose a major field 
during his first two years, the Office of the Dean of Students Affairs 
offers counselling helps, and faculty members are happy to discuss 
aspects of their field. 

During Orientation Week and before registration all new enter- 
ing students, both freshmen and transfer students, will meet with the 
faculty adviser for the major program they have indicated. The ad- 
viser w411 guide them at this time in mapping out a schedule for the 
first two years. The student is then responsible for taking the courses 
required for his program, as outlined in the college Bulletin, in the 
proper sequence, during his freshman and sophomore years. If the 
student has questions concerning the courses required or the proper 
scheduling of them during these first two years, he should see the 
faculty adviser assigned by his major department to confer with stu- 
dents during the pre-advisement period scheduled in the college calen- 
dar. Since the student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements 
of his program, he does not need the written approval of a faculty 
adviser in order to register for courses each quarter.* 



♦However, a student must be extremely careful to observe all regulations for admission to 
courses, such as the requirement of other prerequisite courses, sometimes with a specified 
grade. Credit for a course is invalid unless all its prerequisite requirements are observed. 



42 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

During the third quarter of his sophomore year, a student hoping 
to pursue a four-year major program should take to the faculty ad- 
viser assigned by his major department a list of the courses he has 
completed with grades. Having satisfactorily completed the require- 
ments for the first two years of his major program, he will then be 
admitted formally to the third year of the major program and guided 
by the departmental adviser in mapping out his curriculum for the 
last two years. During the six quarters of his junior and senior years 
the student must have his course selection approved in writing by the 
departmental adviser each quarter before registration. The proper 
time for this is during the pre-advisement period listed in the college 
calendar. During these last two years, the adviser will keep a record 
of the courses the student takes and the grades he makes, and during 
the fall quarter of the senior year, the adviser will signify to the 
Registrar whether the student has completed all requirements for 
graduation in that major program up to that time, and is therefore 
recommended for graduation. 

Relating to Degree Requirements 

1. Each student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements of 
the degree program which he has chosen, in accordance with 
the regulations of the college catalogue. 

2. Exceptions to course requirements for a degree are permitted 
only by the written approval of the Dean of the College upon 
the recommendation of the departm.ent head. 

3. A student will graduate under any catalogue in effect from 
his time of entrance to the college. However, after an absence 
from Armstrong State College of two or more consecutive 
years, a student must meet the requirements of a catalogue 
in effect after his return. 

4. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a 
degree may consist of courses taken by correspondence or ex- 
tension. No correspondence courses may be used to meet the 
requirements in the major field or related fields for the Bache- 
lor's degree or for English composition or foreign language. 
No correspondence courses may be taken while a student is 
enrolled. 

5. Examination on the history and Constitution of the United 
States and of the State of Georgia is required of all persons 
receiving a degree from this college, except those having had 
courses dealing with these subjects. The Department of His- 
tory will post a list of courses satisfying the requirement. It 
will offer an examination satisfying the requirement in the 
fall and spring quarters. (See the College Calendar.) 



I 



REGULATIONS 43 



6. For a Bachelor's degree, a student must earn at Armstrong 
State College the last 45 quarter hours of credit before gradu- 
ation in quarter hour credits numbered 200 or above. At 
least half the courses required in the major field must be 
taken at Armstrong State College. 

7. Before a degree will be conferred upon a student by Arm- 
strong State College, all fees must have been paid, and the 
Registrar must have been notified in writing at least by the 
end of the preceding fall quarter of his intention to gradu- 
ate. A candidate for a degree, unless excused in writing by the 
President, Dean of the College, or Dean of Student Affairs, 
must attend the graduation exercises at which a degree is to 
be conferred upon him. 

Course and Study Load 

The normal course load for full-time students is 15 quarter hours 
and a course in physical education during the freshman and sopho- 
more years). An average student should devote at least thirty hours 
each week, in addition, to course preparation. 

The maximum course load for a student who works full-time is 
1 1 quarter hours. A working student should plan about ten hours 
preparation for each 5 quarter hour course. 

Permission to enroll for more than 17 quarter hours will be 
granted by the Registrar to a student 

a) with an average grade of "B" for the preceding quarter, 
or 

b) in an engineering program, or 

c) requiring an extra course in one of the two quarters 
prior to graduation. 

No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 quarter 
hours in any one quarter. 

Exceptions to these limitations may be made only by the Dean of 
the College. 

Every student enrolled for 15 quarter hours or more must take 
at least one academic course (or a science laboratory section) in the 
afternoon. (If a student plans to work part-time, he should arrange 
his working hours after he registers for courses.) 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt by the faculty that students in college should be held 
accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, grade reports, warnings 



A + 


95- 100 


A 


90- 94 


B + 


85- 89 


B 


80- 84 


G + 


75- 79 


C 


70- 74 


D + 


65- 69 


D 


60- 64 


F 


Below 60 


I 


Incomplete 


W 


Withdrew with no grade 


WF 


Withdrew failing 


NC 


No credit 



44 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

of deficient scholarship and all such notices are not sent to parents 
or guardians by the Registrar except on request. Instead the students 
themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact their 
advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report cards are issued 
at the end of each quarter. Reports of unsatisfactory grades are issued 
in the middle of each quarter. Each student has access to an adviser; 
in addition, the Registrar and all instructors are available to help any 
student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

Numerical Span Honor Points 

4.5 

4 

3.5 

3 

2.5 

2 

1.5 

1 





A student who receives an "I" (incomplete grade) should consult 
his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of the 
course. An "I" grade which has not been removed by the middle of 
the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F". 

Honors 

Dean's List: Students enrolled for at least five quarter hours of 
course work who earn an honor point average of at least 3.5 will be 
placed on the Dean's List, which is published quarterly. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point 
average of 3.2 through 3.5 will be graduated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor 
point average of 3.6 through 3.9 will be graduated magna cum laude. 

Summa Cum, Laude: Those students graduating with an honor 
point average of 4.0 through 4.5 will be graduated summa cum laude. 

Attendance 

The control of student attendance at class meetings and the effect 
of a student's attendance on his grades in a course is left entirely to 
the discretion of the instructor. 

A student is responsible for knowing everything that is announced, 
discussed, or lectured upon in class as well as for mastering all as- 



1 

i 



REGULATIONS 45 



signed reading; he is also responsible for turning in on time all as- 
signments and tests, including recitation and unannounced quizzes. 
The best way to meet thes(^ responsibilities is to attend classes regu- 
larly. An instructor may drop a student from any class with a grade 
of "WF" if he thinks that excessive absence prevents that student 
from satisfactorily fulfilling his responsibilities. If such excessive ab- 
sence is the result of prolonged illness, death in the family, college 
business, or religious holidays, the withdrawal grade will be either "W" 
or ''WF" depending on the student's status at the time he was dropped. 
Each instructor will be responsible for informing his classes on their 
meeting what constitutes excessive absence in the particular class. 
Each student is responsible for knowing the attendance regulation in 
his class and for complying with it. 

Physical Education Program 

All Students who are enrolled for ten quarter hours or more on 
the day schedule are required to complete six physical education 
courses, one in each quarter of the freshman and sophomore years 
(111, 112, 113 in the freshman year). 

A student graduating with an Associate in Arts Degree in less 
than six quarters must take one course in each quarter of his freshman 
and sophomore years. 

Students enrolled in the Associate in Arts Degree program in 
nursing are required to complete three physical education courses. 

A student who has completed at least six months of military 
service is required to take only four courses of physical education, 
which he may choose from all scheduled offerings, during his fresh- 
man and sophomore years. 

Physical education is not required of anyone beyond the age of 25, 
or of anyone enrolled primarily in evening classes. 

The department requires all students to make up excused ab- 
sences; uncxcuscd absences lower the final grade. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 

A student failing to maintain the gradepoint average indicated 
for quarter hours attempted will be placed on academic probation: 

Quarter Hours Attempted at 
Armstrong and Elsewhere Required Cumulative GPA* 

0-15 1.3 

16-30 1.4 

31-45 1.5 

*When a course is repeated, the grade last received replaces all previous grades in this 
course. 



46 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

46-60 L6 

61-75 L7 

76-90 L8 

91-105 L9 

106-120 L9 

121-135 and over 2.0 

A student on academic probation must ( 1 ) at the completion of 
the next 15 quarter hours, achieve the cumulative grade-point average 
required for quarter hours attempted, or (2) at the completion of the 
next 15 quarter hours, achieve at least a "C" average for these 15 
quarter hours and for each successive 15 quarter hours attempted 
until he achieves the cumulative gradepoint average required in the 
table above. 

Failing to meet either of these requirements for academic pro- 
bation, a student will be dismissed from the college for one quarter. 
A third such academic dismissal will be final. 

A student re-entering the college after academic dismissal is 
placed on probation, and must meet the requirement listed above. 

A student dismissed for academic reasons may appeal by letter 
to the President, who will refer the appeal to the Committee on Aca- 
demic Standing. Such a letter of appeal should state the nature of any 
extenuating circumstances relating to the academic deficiency; the 
letter must be received by the President no later than 9 a.m. of 
registration day. 

A student dismissed for academic reasons may appeal his dismissal 
to the President. Such an appeal must be made in writing, should 
state the nature of all extenuating circumstances relating to his aca- 
demic deficiency, and must be received by the President within 48 
hours after the letter of dismissal is mailed. 

A third dismissal for failure to meet the academic standards of the 
college shall in all cases be final. 



O' 



Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal from College presented to the Registrar 
in writing, is a pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re- 
entrance into this institution. Any student planning to withdraw should 
immediately make such an intention known to the Registrar in writing. 
This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. A refund 
will be considered only from date of notice. 



REGULATIONS 47 



A student should formally withdraw from any class by securing 
the permission of the Dean of Student Affairs and of his instructor. 
This written approval should be filed in the Registrar's office. 

If a student withdraws from a course not more than 7 academic 
days after the first day of classes, no record of this course will be 
entered on his transcript. A student who withdraws from a course 
eight academic days or more after the first day of classes will receive 
a grade of "W" or "VVF" depending upon his status at the time of 
the withdrawal. 

Auditing 

A regular student wishing to "audit" a course without receiving 
credit must obtain the written permission of the instructor before he 
registers for the course. (Policy for some courses forbids "auditing") 
An "auditor" cannot change to regular credit status after the first 
week of class. A student may not change from credit status to audit 
status after the first seven class meetings. A student who registers 
for a course as an "auditor" receives no credit, "N. C", on his 
transcript. Regular schedules of fees apply to auditors. 



STUDENT SERVICES and 
ACTIVITIES 

The Division of Student Affairs, administered by the Dean of 
Student Affairs, is responsible for all student services and activities. 
In addition to formal classroom instruction, the College recognizes 
the need for providing programs and services which contribute to a 
well-rounded college experience. Such programs are administered by 
the Division of Student Affairs through the following individuals: 
Registrar and Admissions Officer, Counselors, Director of Financial 
Aid, Director of Student Activities, Alumni Secretary-, and the Cam- 
pus Nurse. 

Academic Advisement 

Before and during registration, members of the faculty are avail- 
able to students for assistance in the selection of course work and 
in the scheduling of classes. InfoiTnation concerning degree require- 
ments and college regulations is provided and topics of general 
academic interest may be discussed. 

By the end of the sophomore year, students are required to 
designate a major field and are assigned to a faculty adviser in that 
area. The faculty adviser then works closely with the student in 
planning a program leading to the successful completion of degree 
requirements. 

Counseling Services 

The Faculty and Administration of Armstrong State College 
recognize that students are frequently confronted with difficult and 
important decisions. In some instances students need the competent 
assistance of professional persons who have been trained to deal with 
the specific problems of college students. 

In light of these needs, qualified Testing and Guidance Counselors 
are located in the Office of Student Personnel to help students in 
(1) clarifying educational and vocational objectives, (2) developing 
effective study skills and habits, and (3) dealing with problems of 
social and emotional significance. 

Orientation 

Orientation for freshmen is scheduled prior to registration for 
the fall quarter. The program is designed to assist students in making 
the transition from high school to college and to acquaint them 



SCHOLARSHIPS 49 



with school policies, traditions, and procedures. The Orientation 
Program includes an introduction to administrative officials and 
faculty; a presentation of the purposes and academic progress of 
Annstrong State College; indoctrination concerning the college's regu- 
lations and requirements; an introduction to student leaders and 
student activities; a survey of the facilities of the school; an opportunity 
for the student to plan a program with counselors; and social events. 



Attendance is required. 



Financial Aids 



A college education for qualified students, regardless of their 
economic circumstances, is the guiding principal behind Armstrong 
State College's program of student financial aid. Through an expanding 
program of financial aid which offers scholarships, short-term loans. 
National Defense Student Loans, and student employment, Armstrong 
State College tries to make it possible for all qualified students with 
limited resources to attend college. 

In selecting a financial-aid recipient, special consideration is given 
to the applicant's record of achievement and promise of success as 
well as his financial need. Gift scholarships usually specify high 
academic standards as an eligibility requirement; otherwise full-time 
students in good standing who progress normally toward their degree- 
goal are eligible for financial aid. 

Armstrong State College uses the College Scholarship Service 
which evaluates the Parents' Confidential Statement. Freshmen may 
secure this form from the local high school counselor, from the Stu- 
dent Personnel Office of the College, or from the College Scholarship 
Service, P. O. Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey. Applications which 
do not include this financial data are incomplete and cannot be con- 
sidered. Applications for scholarships must be filed before May L 
Final action cannot be taken until the applicants have been accepted 
for admission to the college; thus, early application is urged. 

If a student on scholarship withdraws from school, he is obli- 
gated to reimburse the college for the scholarship within one quarter 
following the date of withdrawal. 

Scholarships 
Alpha Phi Omega 
Alpha Tau Beta 

AiTnstrong State College Alumni Association 
Chatham County Teachers' Association 
Chatham Education Association Scholarship 
Garden City Lions Club 
Edward McGuire Gordon Memorial Scholarship 



50 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Robert W. Groves Scholarships 

Jenkins Scholarships 

Junior Chamber of Commerce Scholarship 

Liberty National Bank Scholarship 

Arthur Lucas Memorial Scholarship 

National Secretaries Scholarship 

Pilot Club of Savannah 

Plumrite 

Port City Lions Club 

Rebel Chapter, American Business Women's Club 

Savannah Gas Company 

Savannah Pharmaceutical Association 

Harry G. Strachan, III, Memorial Scholarship 

Strachan Shipping Company 

Regents' Scholarships 

Another source of scholarship aid for students who are residents 
of the State of Georgia is the Regents' Scholarship. These scholarships, 
varying from $250 to $1,000, are awarded to superior students who 
are in need of financial assistance to attend college. To be eligible for 
a Regents' Scholarship, a student must have grades or predicted grades 
that place him in the upper 25^ c of his class. Recipients of Regents' 
Scholarships are expected, upon completion of their program of study, 
to reside in the State of Georgia and work one year for each $1,000 
of scholarship aid received. 

Further information on these scholarships and application forms 
may be obtained from the Student Personnel Office at the College. 
The deadline for applying for the Regents' Scholarships is April 30. 

Federal Programs of Assistance 

Educational Opportunity Grants are available to a limited number 
of students with exceptional financial need who require these grants 
in order to attend college. To be eligible, the student must also show 
academic or creative promise. 

Grants will range from $200 to $800 a year and can be no more 
than one-half of the total assistance given the student. As an academic 
incentive to students, an additional award of $200 may be given to 
those students who were in the upperhalf of their college class during 
the preceding academic year. 

National Defense Student Loans 

High school graduates who have been accepted for enrollment 
or who are already enrolled at Armstrong State College and who need 
financial help for educational expenses, are eligible for student loans. 



1 



SCHOLARSHIPS 31 



The loans bear interest at the rate of 3 per cent per year. 
Repayment of the principal may be extended over a ten-year period, 
except that the institution may require a repayment of no less than 
$15 per month. 

If a borrower becomes a full-time teacher in an elementary or 
secondary school or in an institution of higher education, as much 
as half of the loan may be forgiven at the rate of 10 per cent for 
each year of teaching service. 

Financial Aid Application Procedure 
A financial applicant should take the following steps: 

1. File Armstrong State College Financial Aid Application Form 
with Director of Financial Aid, Student Personnel Office by 
May 14 for fall quarter. 

2. Apply for admission to Armstrong State College through the 
recrular Admissions Office. 

3. Take the College Entrance Examination Boards in December 
or Januaiy and have SAT scores sent to Armstrong State 
College. 

4. Have parents (or guardian) complete and submit the Parents' 
Confidential Statement to College Scholarship Service, Box 
176, Princeton, New Jersey, requesting that the Need Analysis 
be sent to Armstrong State College. 

When the Director of Financial Aid has received all items listed 
above, then and only then, will consideration be given to the student's 
request. 

Other Sources of Financial Aid to 
Armstrong State College 

Short-term and long-term loans are available at low interest rates 
through the Kiwanis and Rensing Loan Funds. 

Clinton Lodge No. 54, F. & A.M. Scholarship — This scholarship 
is for graduates of the regular high schools of the Public School System 
of Chatham County. Grants will be awarded to students whose family 
income is $7,500 or less; who stand in the top 30% of their class; 
who have a combined SAT score of 900, and who are of good 
character. Return to: Education Committee, Clinton Lodge No. 54, 
F. & A.M., P.O. Box 992, Savannah, Georgia, by June 1. 

Solomon's Lodge No. 1, F. & A.M. Scholarship — Two scholar- 
ships for $240 each to be awarded to a graduate of a tax-supported 



52 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

high school. Apply to: Committee on Scholarship Awards, Solomon's 
Lodge No. 1, F. & A.M., P.O. Box 1711, Savannah, Georgia. 

Savanitah Chapter, National Secretaries Association — One schol- 
arship covering tuition, fees and expenses, for a female student major- 
ing in secretarial science. Apply to: high school counselor or typing 
teacher. 

William F. Cooper Education Fund — Provides scholarships to 
female students in all fields except law, theology, and medicine (nurs- 
ing and medical technology are acceptable). Apply to: Trust De- 
partment, Savannah Bank & Trust Company, between April 1 and 
May 31. 

State Teachers' Scholarships — Provide scholarship funds for stu- 
dents who will enter the field of teaching in the State of Georgia. 
Apply to: Georgia State Teachers' Scholarship Program, State De- 
partment of Education, Room 247, State Office Building, Atlanta, 
Georgia 30303. 

The State Scholarship Commission — Provides scholarships for 
students who cannot otherwise finance the cost of a program of 
study in dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, social work, paramedical fields 
and other educational and professional fields of study as defined and 
approved by the Commission. 

Ty Cobb Education Foundation Scholarship — Provides scholar- 
ship aid for residents of the State of Georgia who have completed 
their freshman year in college. Apply to: Ty Cobb Educational 
Foundation Scholarships, Room 454, 244 Washington Street, S.W., 
Atlanta, Georgia 30303. 

Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund — Provides loans at reason- 
able interest rates to students in need of such aid to attend college. 
Apply to: Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund, P.O., Box 1238, 
Columbus, Georgia. 

Savannah Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship — One scholar- 
ship for $200 for a freshman student majoring in pre-pharmacy to 
attend Armstrong College (or the University of Georgia). Apply to: 
Mr. Thomas C. Crumbley, Chairman, Scholarship Committee, Savan- 
nah Pharmaceutical Association, c/o Crumbley's Pharmacy, 1502 
Waters Avenue, Savannah, Georgia. 

Chatham Artillery Scholarships — A number of scholarships for 
$250 each to members of the Chatham Artillery attending college full 
time. Apply to the Chatham Artillery. 

State Department of Vocational Rehabilitation — Students who 
have had a physical or emotional handicap, and have been treated 



SCHOLARSHIPS 53 



successfully, and are considered acceptable for vocational rehabilita- 
tion, may receive financial assistance to attend college through the 
State Department of Vocational Rehabilitation. Apply to: 35 Aber- 
corn Street, Savannah, Georgia. 

Student Assistantships 

A limited amount of financial aid is available to students through 
the Work-Study Program and the College Student Assistantship Pro- 
gram. Through these programs a number of part-time, on campus, 
jobs are made available to students who need financial assistance. 
Interested individuals should contact the Student Personnel Office 
prior to the beginning of each quarter. 

The Student Personnel Office also maintains a file of available 
part-time jobs in the community and is glad to assist students, when- 
ever practicable, in locating outside work. 

Placement Office 

The Placement Officer, located in the Office of Student Affairs, 
assists Armstrong State College graduates in securing business and pro- 
fessional positions. Any senior desiring assistance in securing employ- 
ment should contact this office. 

Conduct 

Every student who enrolls in a course at Armstrong State College 
commits himself, by the act of enrolling, to full compliance with the 
rules and regulations of the Honor System. This system was written 
by a joint student-faculty committee, at the request of the students, 
and was adopted by an overwhelming vote of the student body and 
of the faculty in 1965. It is a fundamental part of our academic 
community's way of life. The Honor System is given under "Academic 
Regulations" in this Bulletin and in the Student Handbook. 

Compliance with the regulations and policies of the faculty of 
Armstrong State College and the Regents of the University System 
and Georgia is assumed. Gambling, hazing, and the use, possession 
or consumption of alcoholic beverage at college functions, whether 
on or off campus is prohibited. For more information regarding policies 
refer to the Student Handbook. 

Student Activities and Organizations 

In addition to an outstanding academic program, Armstrong 
State College offers a complete schedule of extra-curricular student 
activities designed to contribute to the development of the student 



54 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

and assist him in becoming an active and productive member of the 
community in which he lives. 

Student organizations at Armstrong State College reflect the 
natural variety of interests found in a diversified student body. In- 
dividuals who seek a well-rounded education will avail themselves of 
the varied opportunities afforded through the college program of 
student activities. 

Student Government 



The Student Government Association is the official governing 
body of the students at Armstrong State College. It assists in formula- 
ting a program of student services and activities, and it strives to 
express the will of the majority of students and to provide experience 
in democratic living. 

All students are automatically members of the Student Govern- 
ment Association and entitled to a vote in matters of concern to stu- 
dents. Qualified students may seek positions of leadership in the Stu- 
dent Government Association by running for office during the spring 
quarter. 

Student Publications 



The two official student publications on campus are the Ink- 
wellj the college newspaper, and the Geechee, the college annual. 
Both publications are produced entirely by students under the super- 
vision of qualified faculty members. Financed in part by the Student 
Activity Fund, these publications provide opportunities in creative 
writing, reporting, and design. 

Athletics 



Armstrong State College participates in inter-collegiate athletic 
competition in basketball, baseball, and golf. Additional athletic op- 
portunities are provided through the Intramural Program in the areas 
of basketball, softball, swimming, and volleyball. 

Clubs and Organizations 

A variety of clubs and organizations representing varied interests 
and activities are available to students at Armstrong State College. 
These include academic interest clubs, dance and social organizations, 
hobby groups, religious groups, and others. The organized clubs on 
campus are listed below. In addition to these, many new groups are 
cmrently seeking recognition. 



I 



CLUBS 55 



Cheerleaders Wesley Foundation 

Debate Team Baptist Student Union 

English Club Glee Club 

Future Secretaries Westminister Fellowship 

Geechee Alpha Phi Omega 

Masquers Tau Epsilon Phi 

Young Democrats Pep Band 

Newman Club Young Republicans 

Cultural Opportunities 

Armstrong State College provides a variety of cultural opportuni- 
ties for its students. Lectures by eminent scholars in the various aca- 
demic fields and musical concerts by outstanding artists are an integral 
part of the program in general education. Student dramatic productions 
under professional direction and the student choral society have created 
distinguished traditions for these groups. The college purchases a large 
block of tickets for students to all concerts of the Savannah Symphony 
Orchestra. 

Health 

A physical exam is required of all entering full-time students at 
Armstrong State College. The college maintains a campus infirmary 
where a registered nurse is on duty from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Students 
who become ill or who are invoh^ed in accidents while on campus 
should not hesitate to avail themselves of this service. 

The college also makes available, on a voluntary basis, a student 
health and accident insurance policy. The cost of the policy is $12 
for a full year. Information regarding the program may be secured 
in the Student Personnel Office. 

Alumni Office 

The prime purpose of the Alumni Office is to keep former stu- 
dents informed about the college, and to help them keep in touch 
with each other. Any person, who at any time was matriculated as a 
regular student, is eligible for membership in the Alumni Association, 
and upon payment of his dues will receive the quarterly newsletter, 
"The Geechee Gazette," and may vote and hold office in the As- 
sociation. The Alumni Office assists in arranging class reunions, board 
meetings, and other functions. 

Housing 

At the present time no dormitories are provided at Armstrong 
State College. Out-of-town students who attend Armstrong experience 
little or no difficulty in locating suitable apartments and rooms near 
to or within driving distance of the campus. For assistance in this 
matter contact the Student Personnel Office. 



CURRICULA and 
COURSE OFFERINGS 

All degrees awarded by Armstrong State College include these 
minimum requirements: 

Quarter Hours 

English Composition 10 

Literature of the Western World 10 

History of Civilization 10 

Mathematics 10 

Science 10 

Physical Education 6 

I. Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major 
in English, history or music, or Bachelor of Science with a major in 
biology, chemistry or mathematics the following requirements must be 
completed in accordance with the regulations stated in this bulletin. 
Requirements for each major program are described in the appropriate 
departmental listing. 

Requirements for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
of Science. 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

(Core Curriculum) Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. One Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 15 

3. Music, Art, or Philosophy 110 . 5 

4. History of Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 5 

6. Two of the following courses: 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113 
Psychology 201 
Sociology' 201 

7. Mathematics: an approved sequence 10 

8. One of the following sequences of two courses: 10 

Botany 121, 122 
Chemistry 121, 122 



I 



CURRICULA AND COURSE OFFERINGS 57 

Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Zoology 101, 102 



85 

II. Courses in the Major Field (1) 50-70 

(No student will be allowed to take senior division courses 
in his major field unless he has a minimum of C in all 
prerequisite courses in that field.) 

III. Courses in Related Fields {-) 15-30 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 and three 200 courses 6 

V. Free Electives {^) .. 15(or 

more to complete a minimum of 
185 quarter hours, exclusive of 
physical education) 

II. Teacher Education 

The standard credential for teaching in the public schools of 
Georgia is the Teacher's Professional Four- Year Certificate (T-4). 
To qualify for this certificate, one must have completed an approved 
program designed for a specific teaching field and be recommended 
by the college in which the program was completed. Armstrong State 
College offers the following approved teacher education programs: 
(see pages 59-67) 

Elemental^ Education (Grades 1-8) 

Secondary Programs (Grades 7-12) 

Business Education 

English 

Mathematics 

Science (Biology) 

Science (Chemistry) 

Social Science (History) 



^For its major program a department may not require more than 60 quarter hours at all 
levels in the major field, but it may recommend up to 70 quarter hours. 

'For its major program a department will require from 15 to 30 quarter hours of specified 
courses or approved elective courses in related fields, and language courses reaching the 
degree of proficiency specified by the department. (If a course is counted as fulfilling the 
General Requirements, it will not also fulfill the requirement for "III Courses in Related 
Fields.") Total requirements for II and III may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 

'For the B.A. and B.S. degrees a minimum of 185 quarter hours, exclusive of physical educa- 
tion, is required for graduation. For all degrees the completion of a minimum of 70 quarter 
hours in courses numbered 300 or above is a requirement, except in an approved program 
in music. 



58 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Academic Advisement 

A student who desires to become an elementary or secondary 
school teacher should apply during the first quarter of residence to 
the Department of Education for academic advisement. He should 
follow without deviation the approved program designed for his 
preparation and for meeting the requirements for the certificate to 
teach. Upon admission to teacher education, students will be assigned 
advisors as follows: 

(1) Elementary education majors are assigned an advisor in the 
Department of Education who will assist the student in 
planning the total program of studies. 

(2) Students pursuing secondary teaching programs will be as- 
signed an advisor in the Department of Education to advise 
the student concerning the professional sequence courses and 
an advisor in the teaching field major to approve the 
courses of the teaching field. Assignment of the teaching 
field advisor will be made by the head of the academic de- 
partment offering the major. 

Admission to Teacher Education 

All students pursuing a degree program leading toward certification 
by the Georgia State Department of Education as a teacher must apply 
for admission to teacher education at Armstrong State College. This 
application will normally take place during the third quarter of the 
sophomore year or, for transfer students, in the first quarter of the 
junior year. Application forms may be secured from the office of 
the Head of the Department of Education. The following criteria 
are used in admitting applicants to teacher education: 

(1) Completion of at least 75 quarter hours of college credit 
with a "C" average and completion of Education 103 or 303 
with a "C" or better. 

(2) Competence in oral and written expression. 

(3) Satisfactory physical and emotional health. 

(4) Indication of desirable attitude, character, and teaching 
potential. 

Student Teaching 

Student Teaching, the culminating activity of the professional 
sequence, is provided in selected off-campus school centers. The full 
quarter of student teaching is arranged cooperatively by the college, the 
participating schools, and the supervising teachers. Application for 



I 



CURRICULA AND COURSE OFFERINGS 59 

admission to student teaching must be made with the Department of 
Education during the winter quarter preceding the academic year in 
which the student teaching is to be done. The prerequisites for 
admission to student teaching are: 

( 1 ) Admission to a teacher education program. 

(2) Completion of other required professional sequence courses 
with a grade of "C" or higher. Elementary major must 
make a grade of "C" or higher on all specialized content 
courses taken prior to student teaching. 

(3) "C" average at Armstrong State College on all courses at- 
tempted, and a "C" average on all courses acceptable to- 
ward the teaching field or concentration. 

(4) Satisfactory completion of related professional laboratory 
activities including the "September Experience". 

(5) Satisfactory participation in orientation to student teaching. 

For elementary education majors orientation to student teaching 
is included in the elementary' block (Ed. 435 and 436) which is 
scheduled the quarter prior to student teaching. For secondary majors, 
the orientation to student teachinjr is scheduled to meet an hour each 
week during the quarter prior to student teaching. 

A student is admitted to student teaching at the time assignment 
is made, which is three months prior to reporting to the assigned 
school. While student preferences and other personal circumstances 
are considered, the Department of Education reserves the right to ex- 
ercise its discretion in placing student teachers. 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

I. General Requirements: 91 Quarter Hours 

1. Humanities: 30 quarter hours 

English 101, 102, 201, 202, 228 25 

Music 200, Art 200 or Philosophy 110 5 

2. Social Sciences : 30 quarter hours 

History 114, 115, 351, 352 20 

Political Science 113 5 

Geography 111 5 

Psychology 201 _ 5 

3. Sciences: 25 quarter hours 

Botany 121. 122 or Zoology^ 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 121, 122 or Physics 211, 212 10 

Mathematics 105 5 



60 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

4. Physical Education : 6 quarter hours 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

Three 200 courses 3 

IL Electives: 25 quarter hours 

1. Approved electives to establish added proficiency in one area 
to be known as concentration chosen to correspond to the elemen- 
tary curriculum: English, social sciences, sciences, mathematics 
and modem foreign languages 20 

2. Approved elective in related field 5 

in. Specialized Content Courses: 30 quarters hours 

English 331 - 5 

Art 320 -.. 5 

Music 320 5 

Physical Education 320 5 

Mathematics 452 5 

Education 425 5 

IV. Professional Sequence Courses : 40 quarter hours 

Psychology 301 5 

Education 103 or 303; 301, 435, 

436, 446, 447, 448 35 

Total 191 



Bachelor of Business Administration 

(Program for Secondary School Teachers of Business Education) 
I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. Music 200, Art 200, or Philosophy 110 5 

3. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

4. Principles of Economics (Ec. 201, 202) 10 

5. American Government (Pol. Sc. 113) 5 

6. Freshman Mathematics including 5 hrs. of Statistics 15 

7. One of the following requirements of two courses : 10 

Botany 121, 122 
Chemistiy 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 



I 



I 



CURRICULA AND COURSE OFFERINGS 61 

Physics 217, 218 
Zoology 101, 102 

8. Select five of the following courses: 25 

English 228 
Sociology 201 
Psychology 201 
Psychology 305 
Economics 326 
History 351 or 352 

II. Courses in Business Education 30-31 

101 Beginning Typing 2 

102 Beginning Typing Continued 2 

103 Intermediate Typing 2 

201 Advanced Typing 2 

111 Shorthand, Beginning 3 

112 Shorthand, Beginning 3 

113 Shorthand, Intermediate 3 

211 Shorthand or Advanced 

Commerce 202-203 . ._ 3, 4 

213 Office Practices 5 

315 Business Communications 5 



III. Courses in Business Administration 25 

B. A. 211,212 10 

Select three of the following courses 15 

1. B. A. 307, Business Law I 

2. B. A. 340, Principles of Marketing 

3. B. A. 375, Personnel Administration 

4. B. A. 462, Human Relations in Industry 

5. Ec. 327, Money and Banking 

6. Ec. 331, Labor and Industrial Relations 

7. Ec. 335, Public Finance 

IV. Physical Education 1 1 1, 1 12, 1 13 and three 200 courses 6 

V. Professional Sequence 30 

Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to 

Teaching 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational 

Psychology 5 

Education 438 - Secondary School 

Curriculum and Methods, 

Business Education 5 



62 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student 

Teaching 15 



191-2 



Bachelor of Arts 

(Program for Secondary School Teachers of English) 
L General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 - 20 

2. One Foreign Language . 20 

3. Art 200 or Music 200 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 351 or 352 5 

6. Two of the following courses: 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113 
Psychology' 201 
Sociology 201 

7. Freshman Mathematics 10 

8. One of the following requirements of two courses: 10 

Botany 121, 122 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Zoology 101, 102 

II. Courses in Major Field 

Students must complete the requirements for a major in 
including English 325 and 410. 

in. Related Fields (Select five courses) 25 

English 228 Philosophy 

History 352 or 351 Foreign Language 
History 354 (200 and above) 

History 341 Fine Arts 
History 348 ( 200 and above) 

History 350 Education 425 
English 341 



CURRICULA AND COURSE OFFERINGS 63 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113, three 200 courses 6 

V. Professional Sequence 30 

Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to Teaching . 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education 439 - Secondary School Curriculum 

and Methods, English 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 



Total 191 

Bachelor of Science 

(Program for Secondary School Teachers of Mathematics) 
I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. Art 200, Music 200 or Philosophy 110 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 351 or 352 5 

6. Two of the following courses : 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113 
Psychology 201 
Sociology 201 

7. Freshman Mathematics 10 

8. One of the following requirements of two courses : 10 
Botany 121, 122 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 

Physics 217, 218 
Zoology 101, 102 

II. Courses in Major Field 55 

Ij Students must complete the requirements for a major in 

Mathematics which includes: 



64 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Mathematics 104, 201, 202, 203, & 311-12; 
321-322; and one of the sequence 301-302; 
401-402 



IIL Related Fields 15 



IV. Physical Education HI, 112, 113 and three 200 courses 



V. Professional Sequence 30 

Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to Teaching ... 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology . 5 

Education 437 - Secondary School Curriculum 

and Methods, General 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 



Total 191 



Bachelor of Science 

(Program for Secondary Teachers of Science-Major in Biology) 
L General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. One Foreign Language . 15 

3. Art 200, Music 200 or Philosophy 110 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 351 or 352 5 

6. Two of the following courses: 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113 
Psychology 201 
Sociology 201 

7. Freshman Mathematics 10 

8. The following courses: 15 

Zoology 101, 102 
Botany 121 



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CURRICULA AND COURSE OFFERINGS 65 

II. Courses in Biology (Junior-Senior level) 10 

Students must complete the recjuirements for a major 
in Biology including Biology 370, 380; Botany 380 or 
Zoology 390 

III. Courses in other Sciences 35 

Chemistry 128, 129, 341, 342, 343 
Physics 211, 212 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 and three 200 courses 6 

V. Professional Sequence 30 

Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

Psychology 301 - Education Psychology 5 

Education 437 - Secondary School Curriculum 

and Methods, General . 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching .15 

Total 201 



Bachelor of Science 

(Program for Secondary School Teachers of Science-Major in 
Chemistry) 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. Art 200, Music 200 or Philosophy 110 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 351 or 352 5 

6. Two of the following courses : 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113 
Psychology 201 
Sociology' 201 

7. Freshman Mathematics and Math. 104 15 

8. Chemistry 128-129 50 



66 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



IL Courses in Chemistry 50 

Chemistry 281, 282 10 

Chemistry 341, 342, 343 15 

Chemistry 491, 492, 493 12 

Chemistry 480 5 

Electiv^es in Chemistry 8 

in. Courses in Other Sciences . 25 

Physics 15 

Zoology 101, 102 10 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 and three 200 courses 6 

V. Professional Sequence 30 

Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to Teaching .... 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education 437 - Secondary' School Curriculum 

and Methods, General 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 



i 



Total 201 

Bachelor of Arts 

(Program for Secondary School Teachers of Social Science) 
I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. One Foreign Language .. .. 15 

3. Music 200, Art 200, or Philosophy 1 10 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 351 or 352 5 

6. Political Science 113, Sociology 201 10 

7. Freshman Mathematics 10 

8. One of the following sequences of two courses: 10 

Botany 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Zoology 101, 102 



CURRICULA AND COURSE OFFERINGS 67 

II. Courses in History 40 

Students must complete the requirements for a major in 
History including History 351 or 352. 

III. Courses in other Social Sciences 30 

1. Political Science (from 300, 301, 302, and 319) 10 

2. Economics 201, 202 10 

3. Geography 111 or Anthropology 201 5 

4. Sociology 350 or Psychology- 201 5 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 and three 200 courses 6 

V. Professional Sequence 30 

Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education 440 - Secondary School Curriculum 

and Methods, Social Science 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 

Total 191 



in. Bachelor of Business Administration 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Business Admin- 
istration with a major in accounting, economics or management, the 
following requirements must be completed in accordance with the 
regulations stated in this bulletin. For major concentrations, see re- 
quirements described under Department of Business Administration. 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Business Admin- 
istration, the minimum requirements in the various fields of study will 
be: 

I. Humanities 

A. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

B. Music, Art, or Philosophy 110 5 



25 

II. Social Sciences 

A. History of Civilization 114, 115 -... 10 

B. Principles of Economics 201, 202 10 



68 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

C. Elective from History, Political Science 113, 
Psychology 201, Sociology 201 



in. Mathematics and Natural Science 



25 



A. Mathematics (must include Mathematics 111 - 

Statistics) 20 

B. Laboratory Science (sequence) 10 



30 

IV. Business Administration 

Introductory Accounting 211, 212 10 

TOTAL FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE 

(Other than Physical Education) 90 

V. Approved electives from the Humanities, the Social 30 

Sciences, Natural Sciences or Mathematics. History 351 
or 352 must be included and English 228 (Fundamentals of 
Speech) is recommended. At least 15 quarter hours must 
be in courses numbered 200 above. 

VI. Business Core Requirements 35 

(Economics majors - see note below) 

B. A. 200, Sur\'ey of Business 

B. A. 307, Business Law I 

B. A. 320, Business Finance 

Economics 327, Money and Banking 

and three selected from the following: 

B. A. 340, Principles of Marketing 

B.A. 360, Principles of Management 

Economics 331, Labor and Industrial Relations 

Economics 335, Public Finance 

Economics 405, Government and Business 
Note : Economics majors may select any approved combin- 
ation from the business core and the major concentration 
courses. 

VII. Major Concentration .. 30 

(see Departmental requirements) 

VIII. Physical Education 6 



Total Requirements 191 

i 



I 



CURRICULA AND COURSE OFFERINGS 69 

Bachelor of Busiiu^ss Adiiiinislration 
(Major in Business Education) 

Sec listing of requirements under TEACHER EDUCATION 

ONE AND TWO YEAR PROGRAMS IN COMMERCE 
Commerce - Secretarial 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for secretarial positions in business after two years of 
study. Students enroll in the Associate in Arts program (listed else- 
where in this bulletin), devoting the permitted 30 hours of elective 
credits to business and commerce subjects as necessary. The Associate 
in Arts degree is awarded upon completion of the program. 



Commerce - Stenographic 

A student who has only one year to spend in college may acquire 
some of the fundamental clerical skills needed for employment as a 
stenographer or clerk-typist. Whether or not a student will be placed 
in beginning theory classes of shorthand or typing will depend upon 
previous training in those subjects; a more advanced standing may be 
approved by the instructor. A certificate is awarded upon completion 
of the following program. 

Commerce 101, 102. 103 6 

Commerce 111, 112, 113 9 

Commerce 213 -. 5 

Business Administration 211 5 

Business Administration 315 5 

English 101, 102 - 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

^Elective 5 



Total Hours 48 

■^Recommended electives include Mathematics 105, English 228. 

IV. Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 

1. English 101-102, 201-202 20 

2. History of the U. S _ 5 

3. History 114-115 10 

4. Mathematics 101-102 10 



70 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

5. Foreign Languages 

(15 qtr. hrs. or 10 qtr. hrs. plus elective) 10-15 

6. Psychology 201, Sociology 201 10 

7. Physics 211, 212 10 

8. Chemistry 128-129, 281-282, 341-342 30 

9. Zoology 101-102, 325-326 20 

10. Biology 351-352 10 

One course from the following: 

Entomology 301 5 

Zoology 357 

Zoology 372 

Zoology 390 

Physical Education 6 

Elective 5 



151-156 



After satisfactorily completing the required number of courses 
and hours listed above, the degree candidate must complete 12 
months in Clinical Medical Technology at an approved hospital. 
With the completion of this work and satisfactorily passing the 
examination given by the Registry of Medical Technologists, the 
student will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Armstrong State College cooperates with Memorial Hospital of 
Chatham County in giving a B. S. degree with a major in Medical 
Technology. This program has been approved by the Council on 
Medical Education of the American Medical Association and by the 
Board of Schools of Medical Technology of the American Society of 
Clinical Pathologists. 

The Coordinator of this degree program is Dr. L. B. Davenport. 
Jr., Head of the Department of Biology. 



V. Associate in Arts in Nursing 

For the two-year (seven or eight quarters) program of Associate 
in Arts in Nursing, the student must complete the curriculum of 58 
quarter hours in academic courses and 68 quarter hours of professional 
clinical courses as listed under the Department of Nursing. 

This program provides the student with the opportunity to ob- 
tain a general education and to study nursing at the college level. 
Graduates are eligible to take the State Examination for licensure 
to practice as registered nurses. 



CURRICULA AND COURSE OFFERINGS 71 

This program is approved by the Georgia State Board of Nursing 
Examiners. 

VI. Associate in Arts 

For the two-year degree of Associate in Arts a student must 
complete the last 45 quarter hours of course work in this program 
at Armstrong State College. The program is designed to provide a 
substantial liberal education as a base for upper-division specialization. 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. History 114, 115 10 

3. One of the following sequences of two courses: 10 

Botany 121, 122 
Chemistry HI, 112 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Zoology 103, 104 

4. Mathematics 101 or 105 5 

5. Two of the following courses: 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113 
Psychology 201 
Sociology 201 
U.S. History 351 or 352 

6. One of the following courses: 5 

Music 

Art 

Philosophy 110 

7. Physical Education 111,112,113 

and three 200 courses 6 

8. Electives* 30 

96 

The Registrar will evaluate the transcripts of students who peti- 
tion for graduation in terms of the requirements for each of the 
following varieties of degree: 

1. Bachelor of Arts with a major in English 

*If a student plans to continue work in the future toward a Bachelor's degree, he should 
select courses that will meet the listed requirements of a Bachelor degree program. 



72 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

2. Bachelor of Arts with a major in English and requirements 

for secondary certification 

3. Bachelor of Arts with a major in History 

4. Bachelor of Arts with a major in History and requirements 

for secondary certification 

5. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music 

6. Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music and requirements 

for secondary certification 

7. Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology 

8. Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology and requirements 

for secondary certification 

9. Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry 

10. Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and require- 
ments for secondary certification 

H. Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics 

12. Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics and require- 

ments for secondary certification 

13. Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

14. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Ac- 

counting 

15. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Eco- 

nomics 

16. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Manage- 

ment 

17. Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Business 

Education 

18. Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 

19. Associate in Arts 

20. Associate in Arts in Nursing 



1 

I 
I 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

Anthropolofn,' page 117 

Art page 94- 95 

Biology page 74- 76 

Botany - page 76- 77 

Business Administration page 79- 83 

Chemistry page 86- 88 

Chinese page 105 

Commerce page 83- 84 

Economics page 84- 85 

Education page 91- 93 

Engineering Graphics page 110 

English page 105-107 

Entomology page 77 

French page 107-108 

Geography page 101-102 

German page 108 

History page 99-101 

Mathematics page 110-112 

Music --- - page 95- 97 

Xursing page 112-115 

Philosophy page 102 

Physical Education page 116-117 

Physical Science page 88- 89 

Physics _.. page 89- 91 

Political Science page 102-104 

Psychology page 117-119 

Sociolog)^ page 119 

Spanish page 109 

Speech page 106 

Zoology page 77- 78 



74 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to (1) withdraw any 
course for which less than ten students register, (2) limit the enroll- 
ment in any course or class section, (3) fix the time of meeting of 
all classes and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as de- 
mand and faculty warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in languages where 
the same or similar courses have been presented for admission from 
high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed, 
for example: Zoology 101-102. 

After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture; the second, 
the number of hours of laboratory; and the third, the number of 
quarter hours of credit the courses carries. ^For example: Botany 121 
— General Botany (3-4-5). 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are generally planned for the fresh- 
man level; courses numbered 200 to 299 for the sophomore level; 
courses numbered 300 to 399 for the junior level; courses numbered 
400-499 for the senior level. 



Anthropology 

(See listing under Department of Psychology and Sociology) 

Art 

(See listing under Department of Fine Arts) 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professor Leslie B. Davenport, Jr., Head; Associate Professors Crosby, 
Thorne and Waffle; Assistant Professor Ashbrook 

Departmental Requirements for the Major in Biology 

The major in biology consists of Zoology 101-102, Botany 121, 
122, and at least 40 quarter hours credit in biology courses (botany, 
zoology, etc.) numbered 300 or above. In addition, biology majors 
must complete the course sequence in organic chemistry (15 quarter 
hours). The course in General College Physics (15 quarter hours) is 
strongly recommended and should be considered essential for those 
who expect to continue the study of biology beyond the B.S. degree. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 75 

Every student acquiring a major in biology must include in his 
program the following courses: Biology 370; Biology 380; and Botany 
380 or Zoology 390/ 

Beginning students who have successfully completed strong 
courses in biology in high school are advised to take the examination 
for advanced placement which are offered with the College Entrance 
Examinations. Arrangements to take these may be made through the 
office of the Dean of Student Affairs. 

Course Offerings 

Biology 210 — Microbiology (3-4-5). Summer. Prerequisities : 10 
hours of biological science with laboratory and 5 hours of inorganic 
chemistry. 

An introduction to the study of micro-organisms with primary 
emphasis on bacteria. The morphology, life history, and public health 
importance of representative bacteria, molds, viruses, protozoa, and 
helminths are considered. This course is intended primarily for nursing 
students. 

Biology 351 — Introductory Microbiology, I. (3-4-5) . Fall. Prerequi- 
sites: 10 hours of biological science, 5 hours of physical science (with 
lab) and 5 hours of organic chemistry. 

A survey of micro-organisms with special emphasis on bacteria 
and their relationship to man. 

Biology 325 — Introductory Microbiology, II. (3-4-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Biology 351. 

A survey of the microscopic and macroscopic fungi common to 
the local geographic area. 

Biology 358 — Histological Technique. (0-10-5). Winter. Prerequi- 
sites: Botany 121-122 or Zoology 101-102. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, 
staining, and mounting plant and animal materials for study. 

Biology 370 — Genetics (3-4-5). Winter. Prerequisites: Botany 122 
or Zoology 101-102. 

An introduction to the principles of biological inheritance. 

Biology 380 — General Ecology (3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisites: Two 
upper division courses in biology (botany or zoology) . 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the 
welfare of man, co-ordinated with a study of populations and com- 
munities in the field. 



76 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Biology 400 — Field Biology. Ten quarter hours credit. Eight 
weeks, summer session. Lectures, laboratory and extensive field studies. 
Prerequisites: 25 quarter hours in the Biological Sciences with at 
least 5 hours in animal science and 5 hours in plant science. Geology 
recommended. At Armstrong State College five hours credit may 
apply toward the major in biology, the other five hours will apply as 
elective credit. 

The study of representative terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna 
and the interplay with their environments. Frequent one day field 
trips within a thirty-mile radius of the Field Station at Rock Eagle 
and one or more extended field trips of several days duration. For 
details, consult the Department Chairman. 

Biology 410 — Cellular Physiology (3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisites: 
Zoology 390 and one other senior division course in biology, plus 5 
hours of ors^anic chemistrv. 

A consideration of the relationships between sub-microscopic 
anatomy and cell chemistry, emphasizing permeability, metabolism, 
and growth. 

Biology 440 — Cytology (2-6-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Two senior 
division courses in biolog)^ 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, growth, differen- 
tiation, and reproduction. 

Biology 450 — Evolution (3-0-3). \Vinter. Prerequisite: major in 
biology (at least 15 qtr. hrs. credit in senior division courses). 

Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

Botany 121 — General Botany (3-4-5). Offered each quarter. 

A study of the structure of the roots, stems, and leaves, basic 
physiology and ecology of plants. Laboratory work on representative 
species. 

Botany 122 — General Botany (3-4-5). Offered each quarter. 
Prerequisite: Botany 121. 

A study of reproduction, heredity, and evolution of seed plants, 
with studies of representative species of the other major plant groups. 

Botany 305 — Identification of Flowering Plants (0-10-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Botany 121. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis on local 
flora. 

Botany 323 — Plant Anatomy (0-10-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Botany 
121-122. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 77 

The origin and dcvcloj^nicnt of the organs and tissue systems of 
vascular plants, and a eoniparati\e study of the structure of roots, 
stems, leaves, flowers and fruits. 

Botany 380 — Plafit Physiology (3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisites: 
Botany 121 and 122. 

A sur\ey of physiological processes occurring in economic plants 
and the conditions which affect these processes. (Not offered 1967- 
68). 

Entomology 301 — Introductory Entomology I (3-4-5). Fall. Pre- 
requisites: Zoology 101-102. 

An introduction to the study of insects — their structure, identifi- 
cation, and biology. (Not offered 1967-68). 

Zoology 101-102 — Introductory Zoology (6-8-10). Both parts are 
offered each quarter. 

A basic course in biological principles wath emphasis upon animal 
life; the course includes consideration of cellular phenomena and a 
survey of the major animal phyla with discussions of their morpholo- 
gy, physiology, ecology, and organic evolution. The second quarter is 
a continuation of the first; no credit is allowed toward graduation 
until the sequence is completed. 

Zoology 108-109 — Human Anatomy and Physiology (6-8-10). 
Winter, Spring. Not open to pre-professional students in the biological 
sciences. 

A basic course considering the gross anatomy, histology, and phy- 
siology of the organ systems. Laboratory work includes thorough 
dissection of a typical mammal as well as basic experiments in physi- 
ology. The second quarter is a continuation of the first; no credit is 
allowed toward graduation until the sequence is completed. 

Zoology 325 — Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Zoology 101-102. 

A survey of the invertebrate animals, their biology, structure, and 
relation to other animals. 

Zoology 326 — Vertebrate Zoology (3-4-5). Prerequisite: Zoology 
101-102. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and na- 
tural history of the vertebrate animals. 

Zoology 355 — Embryology (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequisites: Zoology 
101-102 or equivalent in another biological science. 



78 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



An elementary course in embryology in which the chick is used 
to illustrate the basic principles of developmental anatomy. 

Zoology 356 — Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates (3-6-6). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Zoology 101-102. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertebrates. 

Zoology 357 — Animal Histology (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequisites: Zo- 
ology 101-102. 

A study of the tissues and their organization into organs and 
organ systems in animals. 

Zoology 372 — Parasitology (3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisites: Zoology 
101-102 and Zoology 325. 

A comparative study of the internal and external parasites of man 
and other animals. 

Zoology 390 — General Animal Physiology (3-4-5). Prerequisite: 
Zoology 101-102 and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to general physiological processes. 

Zoology 429 — Endocrinology (3-4-5). Winter. Prerequisites: Zo- 
ology 390 and one other senior division course in biolog\-. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism 
and reproductive cycles. (Not offered 1967-68). 



Botany 

(See listing under Department of Biology) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



79 



DEPARTMENT OF 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Orange Hall, Head; Professors Davis and Bhatia; Associate 
Professor Haas; Assistant Professors McCarthy and Vining. 

Major Concentrations. (For Business Education, see listing under 
Teacher Education). No student will be allowed to take upper divi- 
sion courses unless he has a minimum grade of C in all prerequisite 
courses in his major field. An average of at least 2.0 in his major 
courses will be a requirement for graduation. 



302 Intermediate Accounting I, H 

and four of the following: 
Cost Accounting I 
Cost Accounting H 
Income Taxation I 
Income Taxation II 
Accounting Systems 
Auditing Principles 

Price and Income Theory 
Seminar on Contemporary Economic Prob- 
lems and four of the following: 
Economic History of the United States 
Public Finance 
Economic Development 
Government and Business 
International Trade 
Comparative Economic Systems 
Business Cycles and Forecasting 
Investments 

3. Management 

B.A. 465 Business Policy 

and five of the following: 
B.A. 308 Business Law II 
■"B.A. 315 Business Communications 
B.A. 329 or B.A. 301 Cost or Intermediate Account- 
ing I 
B.A. 375 Personnel Administration 
B.A. 425 Managerial Accounting 
B.A. 460 Production Planning and Control 
B.A. 462 Human Relations in Industry 
Econ 405 Government and Business 
Industrial Psychology 



Accounting 


B.A. 


301, 


B.A. 


329 


B.A. 


330 


B.A. 


436 


B.A. 


437 


B.A. 


440 


B.A. 


450 


Economics 
Econ 401 


Econ 


435 


Econ 


326 


Econ 


335 


Econ 


345 


Econ 405 


Econ 410 


Econ 420 


Econ 


425 


Econ 431 



80 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Course Offerings 
Business Administration 

Business Administration 200 — Survey of Business. (5-0-5). 

A first course in business for Business Administration majors or 
an elective for non-majors who wish to gain an understanding of the 
functioning of business enterprises in our capitalistic system. The 
course will provide a basic familiarity with: (a) the economic, social, 
and political environment in which business enterprises operate, and 
(b) the tools and managerial skills used in business decision-making 
in the various functional areas such as organization, management, 
financing, marketing, production and personnel. (Not open to upper- 
division businses majors who have already taken 300-level work) 

Business Administration 211 — Introductory Accounting I. (5-0-5) . 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of 
accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, working 
papers, accounting statements, controlling accounts, special journals, 
partnerships and corporations. 

Business Administration 212 — Introductory Accounting II. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 211. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as departmental operations, manufacturing accounts, the analysis of 
financial statements, accounting aids to management, statement of 
application of funds. 

Business Administration 301 — Intermediate Accounting I. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Accounting theory and the solution of problems requiring an 
application of accounting theory. 

Business Administration 302 — Intermediate Accounting II. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 301. 

A continuation of Business Administration 301 emphasizing the 
theories of valuation of fixed assets and liability accounts, the appli- 
cation of these theories and the interpretation of financial statements 
prepared on the basis of these theories. 

Business Administration 307 — Business Law I. (5-0-5). 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the following 
subjects: Contracts, offer and acceptance, consideration, rights of 
third parties and discharge: agency, liabilities of principal and agent; 
negotiable instruments, elements of negotiability, endorsement and 
transfer, liabilities of parties. 



COURSE OFl EKINGS 81 

Business Administration 308 — Business Law II. (5-0-5). 

The law applicable to the following subjects: partnership forma- 
tion, powers and liabilities of partners; corporation, formation, powers, 
rights of security holders; sales, vesting of title, warrants, remedies. 

Business Administration 315 — Business Communications. (5-0-5). 

Principles of effective business communications, application of 
these principles to business and technical report writing, correspond- 
ence, and other information media. 

Business Administration 320 — Business Finance. (5-0-5). Prereq- 
uisite: Business Administration 212. 

The internal and external sources of financing for business enter- 
prises; acquisition and management of long-term and shorter-term 
funds; types of securities; equity and debt instruments; problems of 
financial management. 

Business Administration 329 — Cost Accounting I. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 212. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing, 
including job order and process methods. 

Business Administration 330 — Cost Accounting II. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 329. 

Standard cost procedures; budgeting; distribution costs and spe- 
cial cost problems. 

Business Administration 340 — Principles of Marketing. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 or Economics 202. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and 
ser\dces from producers to consumers. Subject is approached from 
the functional, institutional, commodity, and integrated analytical 
viewpoints. 

Business Administration 360 — Principles of Management. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 or 212. 

The basic principles of management applicable to all forms of 
business and to all levels of supervision; the functions of planning, 
organizing, directing, and controlling as components of the manage- 
ment process. 

Business Administration 375 — Personnel Administration. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 or Economics 201. 

Personnel administration as a staff function. Employment stand- 
ards, training, safety and health, employee services and industrial 
relations. 



82 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Business Administration 425 — Managerial Accounting. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Emphasizes theory and practice of accounting from the stand- 
point of those who direct business operations and shape business 
policy. 

Business Administration 436 — Income Taxation I. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 212. 

A study of federal income tax law and regulations; the income 
tax returns of individuals, partnerships, and corporations. 

Business Administration 437 — Income Taxation II. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 436 or consent of instructor. 

A continuation of Business Administration 436 with emphasis on 
corporation and fiduciary returns, gift taxes and estate taxes. 

Business Administration 440 — Accounting Systems. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 302. 

The design and installation of appropriate accounting systems in 
accordance with the needs of the business being serviced. 

Business Administration 450 — Auditing Principles. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 302. 

The principles of audits and financial verifications, standards of 
field work, preparation of audit working papers, writing audit reports, 
and auditing ethics. 

Business Administration 460 — Production Planning and Control. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 or upper-division 
status and consent of instructor. 

Appreciation of the principles of production management is 
developed through study of plant layout, inventory control, materials 
handling, production scheduling, quality control, and associated topics. 

Business Administration 462 — Human Relations in Industry. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 or upper division 
status and consent of instructor. 

A study of the process of integrating people into the work situa- 
tion so that they are motivated to work together harmoniously, pro- 
ductively, and with economic, psychological and social satisfactions. 

Business Administration 465 — Business Policy. (5-0-5). Prereq- 
uisite: Business Administration 360 or consent of instructor. 

The formulation and application of business policy by top man- 
agement. Emphasis is on decision-making. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 83 

Coniiiierce 

Commerce 101 — Be<^lrniing Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper tech- 
nicjue and mastery of the keyboard. 

Commerce 102 — Beginning Typing Continued (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. 

This course is a continuation of speed development. In addition, 
instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulations is given. 

Commerce 103 — Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 101-102 or equivalent. 

A typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed build- 
ing and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, 
minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce 111 — Beginning Shorthand (5-0-3). Fall. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Reading dicta- 
tion and transcription from studied material. A dictation speed of 
65 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 112 — Beginning Shorthand (Continued) (5-0-3). 
Winter. 

A continuation of beginning shorthand from foundation learned 
in fall quarter. Students entering directly into this course must have 
a knowledge of basic brief forms and the fundamentals of beginning 
Gregg shorthand. 

Commerce 113 — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-3). Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of 100 words a minute. 

Commerce 201 — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 103 or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and ac- 
curacy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and 
business papers. Most of the student's works is done on a production 
timing basis. 

Commerce 202 — A continuation of Commerce 201 (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. 

Commerce 203 — A continuation of Commerce 202 (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. An average of 60 words a minute is attained. 



84 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Commerce 211 — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-3). Fall. Prerequi- 
sites: Commerce 111, 112, 113 or equivalent. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are ap- 
plied in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in 
transcribing. Dictating and typing of mailable letters are emphasized. 
A speed of 120 words a minute for five minutes is attained. 

Commerce 213 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 112 or equivalent or permission of instructor. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible, including the instruction of various business machines. Practical 
problems deal with typing, filing and office courtesy. 

Economics 

Economics 201 — Principles of Economics I. (5-0-5). 

A study of the principles underlying the economic institutions 
of the present time and their application to economic problems. 
Aggregative or macroeconomics is emphasized. 

Economics 202 — Principles of Economics II. (5-0-5). 

Microeconomics, with emphasis on the theory of prices and 
factor shares. If a student plans to take only one economics course, 
Economics 201 or Economics 326 would be more siutable than Eco- 
nomics 202. 

Economics 326 — Economic History of the United States. (5-0-5). 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis 
on the period since 1860, and including developments in agriculture, 
industry, labor, transportation, and finance. 

Economics 327 — Money and Banking. (5-0-5) . Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 201. 

Monetary theory, banking theory and practice, central bank con- 
trols, other financial institutions, credit flows, monetary policies to 
achieve desired economic effects. 

Economics 331 — Labor and Industrial Relations. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Economics 201. 

The development and structure of the labor movement in the 
United States; the principles of wage determination; collective bar- 
gaining; and public policy toward labor unions. 

Econo?nics 335 — Public Finance. (5-0-5). Prerequsite: Economics 
201. 



k 



COURSE OFFERINGS 85 

The economic effects of go\ernniental taxation, expenditures, and 
public debt management. The principal sources of revenue and types 
of expenditures at the federal, state and local levels. The proper 
scope of government and issues of fairness in taxation. 

Economics 345 — Economic Development. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 201. 

The nature and causes of economic stagnation in developing 
nations of the world, urgent need for their economic development, 
theoiy of economic growth, ways of fostering development, and bal- 
anced growth and industrialization. 

Economics 401 — Price and Income Theory. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 202. 

Economic analysis, especially the theories of production, price 
detemiination, factor shares, income distribution and determination. 

Economics -^^b — Government and Business. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
upper-division status. 

The effects of public policies upon business and industry, with 
emphasis on anti-trust, taxation, regulatory, and defense policies. 

Economics ^\^ — International Trade. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 202. 

Export-import trade, emphasizing exchange techniques, balance 
of trade and payments accounts, and the theory of international 
specialization and exchange, the relationship of international trans- 
actions to national income. 

Economics 420 — Comparative Economic Systems. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Economics 202. 

Study of economic problems under different economic systems 
such as capitalism, socialism; and introduction to Marxian economic 
theory. 

Economics 425 — Business Cycles and Forecasting. (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Economics 327 or Economics 201 and consent of instructor. 

A study of cycle and growth theories, causes of business fluctua- 
tions, means of prevention or control, policy proposals to maintain 
full employment and price stability. Problems of economic growth and 
forecasting. 

Economics 431 — Investments. (5-0-5). 

The investment risks inherent in different investment media; se- 
lection of appropriate media in accordance with individual or institu- 
tional goals and risk-bearing capacity. Types of investments and 
securities. 

Economics 435 — Seminar on Contemporary Economic Problems. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisites: Economics 201 and 202. 

General problems of production, employment and income, with 
special reference to the specific problems faced by the American 
economic system. 



86 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS 

Professor Fretwell G. Crider, Head; Associate Professors Harris, 
Robbins, and Stratton; Assistant Professor Hill 

Departmental Requirements for the Major in Chemistry 

Quarter 
I. Major Requirements Hours 

A. Lower Division 

General Inorganic Chemistry (128, 129) 10 

Analytic Chemistry (Qual. 281; Quant. 282) 10 

B. Upper Division 

Organic Chemistry (341, 342, 343) 15 

Physical Chemistry (491, 492, 493) 12 

Electives (13 qtr. hrs.) from the following: 13 

Advanced Inorganic (421) 4 qtr. hrs. 

Qualitative Organic Analysis (448) 4 qtr. hrs. 

Instrumental Analysis (480) 5 qtr. hrs. 

Special Problems in Chemistry 
(498, 499) 1-5 qtr. hrs. 

Chemistry 431, 432,441 

II. Requirements in Related Fields 

A. Mathematics through Calculus 5 

B. Physics 15 

Course Offerings 
Chemistry 

Chemistry 121, 122 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Prerequisite: 
Entrance Requirements. 

This course is designed for the student who is pursuing a non- 
science college major. It includes a study of the fundamental laws 
and theories of chemistry emphasizing the descriptive chemistry of 
the elements and their relationships as shown in the Periodic Table. 
The course is a lecture and laboratory study with minimum reliance 
on mathematics. 

Chemistry 128, 129 — General Inorganic (3-4-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 9. 

A study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry 
with a quantitative approach to the subject. This course is designed 
for the science major expecting detailed work in the modern concept 
of the atom, chemical bonding and a thorough treatment of the 



i 



COURSE OFFERINGS 87 

chemistry of particular elements, families and groups. The laboratory 
work includes an understanding of fundamental techniques as applied 
to beginning experiments and a study of properties and preparations. 

Chemistry 281— Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 129. 

Theory and adequate laboratory practice in the analysis of com- 
mon cations and anions. 

Chemistry 2S2~Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (2-9-5). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 281. 

The fundamental theories and practice of gravimetric and volu- 
metric analysis with an introduction to instrumental analysis. 

Chemistry 341, 342, 343— Organic Chemistry (3-6-5). Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 129. 

Three quarter course in the study of aliphatics, aromatic hydro- 
carbons and their derivatives. Includes the study of polyfunctional 
compounds, polynuclear hydrocarbons, carbohydrates, amino acids, 
heterocyclics and related compounds. The course will emphasize 
organic reactions in terms of modern electronic theory. 

Chemistry 350 — Chemical Literature (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 342 or consent of Department Head. 

A study of the use of the chemical library and the important 
journalls, references and information sources. Course will include 
instruction in report writing. (Not offered in 1966-67) 

Chemistry 360 — Biochemistry (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 
343. 

A study of the chemical nature of cellular constituents and their 
metabolisms. 

Chemistry 371 — Industrial Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Consent of Department Head. 

This course present a study of inorganic chemical industries. 
It deals with chemical processes and modern developments in these 
industries. A survey of operations and economics is given. 

Chemistry 372 — Industrial Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of Department Head. 

This course covers the important organic chemical industries in 
the same manner as Chemistry 371. 

Chemistry 421 — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3-3-4). Prereq- 
uisite: Chemistry 282. 



88 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Selected topics in inorganic chemistry tending to increase stu- 
dents' understanding of mechanisms of chemical reactions. Empha- 
sizes the periodicity of elements. 

Chemistry 4^31, 432 — Seminars (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Chemistry 
493, Chemistry 343, or Chemistry 421. 

Selected topics for group discussion. 

Chemistry 441 — Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 343. 

A further study of important organic reactions emphasizing 
theories of reaction mechanisms of organic chemistry. 

Chemistry 448 — Organic Qualitative Analysis (2-6-4). Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 343. 

Systematic approach to the identification of organic compounds. 

Chemistry 480 — Instrumental Analysis (2-9-5). Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 282, 342. 

Includes study of principles involved in the operation and the 
laboratory use of special instruments for analysis. 

Chemistry 491, 492, 493— Physical Chemistry (3-3-4). Prerequi- 
sites: Chemistry 343, 282. Physics 213. Mathematics 104. 

Fundamental principles of physical chemistry including the study 
of solids, liquids, gases, thermochemistry, thermodynamics and solu- 
tions. The course will also cover a study of chemical equilibria, chemi- 
cal kinetics, electrochemistry, colloids, quantum mechanics and nu- 
clear chemistry. 

Chemistry 498, 499 — Special Problems (Schedule and credit 
vary). Prerequisites: Chemistry 493 and consent of Department Head. 

Problems to be assigned and work directed by a member of the 
Department. Supervised research including literature search, labora- 
tory experimentation and presentation of results. Course credit will 
depend on problem. 

Chemistry 105 — Chemistry for Nurses (4-3-5). 

Principles of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with 
special application to nursing practice. 

Physical Science 

Physical Science 111 (5-0-5). No prerequisite. 

A study of the scientific method and its use in man's solutions 
of problems in his physical environment. The student learns the 



COURSE OFI ERINGS 89 

fundamentals of physics and acquires familiarity with the hasic 
formulas and principles. He learns the similarity of the application of 
principles involving small particles to larger or planctaiy particles. 
If student has completed a course in college physics, no credit will 
be given for this course. 

Physical Science 113 (5-0-5). No prerequisite. 

A survey of elementary geology and astronomy. This course 
covers what might be termed a "Biology of the Earth", concerning 
itself with earth materials, weather and climate, rocks and minerals, 
erosion and sedimentation, vulcanism and diastrophism, the law of 
uniform changes and earth history as interpreted from the rock record. 
The astronomy phase and the study of the stars and galaxies starts 
with the planetary system of our own sun. The study proceeds to 
the other stars and stellar systems, including, of course, the nebulae. 
Finally, the course covers general relativity and cosmology, entering 
the frontiers of Physical Science to conjecture on the "science of 
tomorrow". 



Physics 

Physics 211 — General Physics — Mechanics (4-2-5). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 101 and 102 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations, and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of mechanics, sound and heat. Force and motion, work 
and power, energy, torque, the properties of gases and an introduc- 
tion to Thermodynamics are included. 

Physics 212 — Electricity, Magnetism and Basic Light Through 
Geometric Optics. (4-2-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 
and 102, or consent of the instructor. 

Physics 212 comprises a course in electricity, magnetism, and 
geometric optics. It includes the study of static electricity, current 
electricity, magnetism, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, 
capacitance, inductance and alternating current. The nature and 
propagation of light, reflection and refraction, mirrors and lenses, 
optical instruments are covered in the latter part of the course. 

Physics 213 — Light Phenomena and Modern Physics. (4-2-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 and 102 and Physics 212 or 
consent of the instructor. 

Physics 213 continues the study of the phenomena of light, in- 
cluding interference, diffraction, and polarization; and then proceeds 
into modern physics via the quantum theory of radiation, atomic 
structure, and the theory of relativity. 



90 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Physics 217— Mechanics, Sound and Heat (5-3-6). Fall and 
Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or 201. (This course may 
be taken concurrently.) 

Physics 217, 218, and 219 together constitute a thorough course 
in basic physics for engineering students. This course includes classical 
physics, and an introduction to modern physics (to which more than 
one quarter of the three courses is devoted) including the quantum 
theory of radiation, atomic structure, relativity, X-Ray, wave versus 
corpuscular propagation, natural radioactivity, nuclear reactions, 
and artificial radioactivity, nuclear energy and cosmic rays, and the 
fundamental particles. 

The five classroom hours each week include some lectures and 
films, but the solution of a large number of problems is required 
including application of the elements of the calculus. 

The laboratory work is designed to give practice in the art of 
making precise measurements, proficiency in the manipulation of 
apparatus and added familiarity with some of the concepts of physics. 
The theory of errors is stressed enough to give students the ability' 
to decide under what conditions the greater expense of more precise 
measurements is justified. 

Physics 217 is an intensive course in mechanics, sound and heat. 
It includes the study of statics, kinetics, friction, work, power, energy, 
momentum, machines, elesticity, fluid mechanics, harmonic motion, 
wave motion and vibrating bodies, temperature-expansion, heat trans- 
fer, work and heat, and the laws of thermodynamics. 

Physics 218 — Electricity, Magnetism and Basic Light Through 
Geometric Optics (5-3-6). Winter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 
or 201. 

Physics 218 is an intensive course in electricity, magnetism, and 
geometric optics. It includes the study of the ideal gas and the atomic 
view of matter, static electricity, current electricity, magnetism, mag- 
netic fields, electromagnetic induction, capacitance, inductance, alter- 
nating currents, electrical instruments, electromagnetic waves, nature 
and propagation of light, reflection and refraction, mirrors and lenses, 
optical instruments. 

Physics 219 — Light Phenomena and Modern Phenomena and 
Modern Physics (5-3-6). Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or 
201, and Physics 218. 

Physics 219 continues the study of the phenomena of light, in- 
cluding interference, diffraction, and polarization; and then proceeds 
into modern physics via the quantum theors' of radiation, atomic 
structure, and the theories of relativity (see Physics 217, above), 



I 



COURSE OFFERINGS 91 



During this quarter laboratory work is on a "senior course" level and 
is designed to encourage independent thought and to deviate defi- 
nitely from the somewhat stereotyped work of the preceding (juarters. 

Chinese 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

Commerce 

(See listing under Department of Business Administration) 

Economics 

(See listing under Department of Business Administration) 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Professor William W. Stokes. Head; Assistant Professor Coleman 

The purpose of the Department of Education is to co-ordinate 
the college-wide programs of teacher education and to offer pro- 
fessional courses for the pre-service and in-service preparation of 
teachers. For specific requirements of the teacher education pro- 
grams offered by the college, see pages 57-67. 

Course Offerings 

Education 103 — Orientation to Teaching. (5-0-5). 

The study of the status of education and of teaching as a pro- 
fession. The student engages in directed self-study and plans for the 
achievement of his professional goals. 

Education 303 — Orientation to Teaching. (5-0-5). 

For transfer and other students who have not had Education 
103, or the equivalent in preparation for formal admission to the 
teacher education program. 

Education 301 — Child Development and the Educative Process. 
(2-6-5). 

A study of the developmental learning characteristics of pupils 
in relation to ways in which the school environment may elicit 
further development. Students attend seminars on campus and 
serve as teacher aids in selected elementary schools. Application for 
this course must be made with the Co-ordinator of Elementary Edu- 
cation the quarter preceding registration for the course. Prerequisite: 
Admission to Teacher Education. 



92 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Education 425 — The Teaching of Reading. (5-0-5). 

The teaching of reading including methods, techniques, and 
materials. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Education 435 — Elementary School Curriculum. (5-0-5). 

The study of existing instructional programs and experiences 
in curriculum design. Directed observation. Prerequisite: Edu. 301 
and Psy. 301, or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: Edu. 436. 

Education 436 — Elementary School Methods. (5-0-5). 

The study and evaluation of teaching methods, materials, and 
equipment in the various teaching fields. Actual unit development 
in preparation for student teaching. Prerequisite: Edu. 301 and Psy. 
301, or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: Edu. 435. 

Education 437-440 — Secondary School Curriculum and Methods. 
(5-0-5). 

The study of secondary school curriculum with emphasis upon 
materials and methods of teachmg. Directed observation. Registra- 
tion is by section as indicated below: Prerequisite: Admission to 
Teacher Education and Psy. 301. 

Education 437 — Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
General. 

Education 438 — Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Busi- 
ness Education. 

Education 439 — Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
English. 

Education 440 — Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
Social Science. 

Education 446, 447, 448 — Student Teaching. (15 quarter hours). 

Students are placed in selected schools for one quarter as full- 
time student staff members. Classroom teaching experiences and 
other staff responsibilities are jointly supervised by the college staff 
and supervising teachers in the selected schools. Prerequisite: See 
page 58. 

Education Courses Offered in Other Departments 

Art ?>20—Art for the Elementary Teacher. (4-2-5). 

A study of materials and methods for teaching art at the 
elementary school level. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Edu- 
cation. 



I 



COURSE OFFERINGS 93 

English 331— Children's Litfrature. (5-0-5). 

The literary genres usually emphasized in elementary and sec- 
ondary schools will be studied. The primary purpose of this course 
will be to consider how literature may both stimulate the child and 
cater to his interests as well. Secondary purposes will be the con- 
sideration of critical techniques, methodology, and overall usefulness 
of materials studied. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Mathematics 452 — Basic Ideas of Arithmetic. (5-0-5). 

This course is designed to give elementary teachers a clear under- 
standing of the fundamental ideas of arithmetic and to acquaint them 
with the material currently being used in the elementary schools. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 105, and Admission to Teacher Education. 

Music 320 — Music for the Elementary Teacher. (5-0-5). 

An introduction to music skills and materials for the elementary 
classroom teacher. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Physical Education 320 — Health and Physical Education for the 
Elementary Teacher. (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the teaching of health and physical educa- 
tion for the elementai7 teacher. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher 
Education. 

Psychology 301 — Educational Psychology. (5-0-5) . 

The application of behavioral science to the problems of learn- 
ing in the classroom. Prerequisite: Phychology 201 and Admission 
to Teacher Education. 

Engineering 

(See listing under Department of Mathematics) 

English 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Professor Harry Persse, Head; Assistant Professor McKinnell 

Departmental Requirements for the 
Major in Music 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in Music 



94 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

In addition to satisfying the requirements of the core curriculum 
for the Bachelor of Arts Degree, those majoring in music will com- 
plete the following program: 

Lower Division Courses: Music Theory: Music 110, 111, 112 9 

210, 211, 212 9 

Sight-Singing: Music 101, 102, 103 3 

201, 202, 203 3 

Applied Music: Music 100 level 6 

200 level 6 

Total 36 

Upper Division Courses: Music History: Music 310, 311 10 

Music Theory: Music 312, 410 8 

Applied Music: 300 and/or 400 level .. 6 

Total 24 

In addition to the above, the major program must include twenty- 
five quarter hours of approved electives in the fields of Art History, 
Literature, and Philosophy. 

Additional courses in music may be elected, but no more than 
seventy hours in the major field may be applied towards the degree. 



Course Offerings 
Art 

Art 101 — Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5). 

An introduction to the principles of design and the means and 
materials of drawing. 

Art 102 — Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5). 
A continuation of Art 101. 

Art 103 — Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5). 
A continuation of Art 102. 

Art 200 — Art Appreciation (5-0-5). 

The study of theories of art and their application in master- 
works of art from all ages, directed towards increasing the under- 
standing and enjoyment of art for the non-art major. 

Art 201 — Drawing and Painting (0-6-3). 

Drawing and painting from various figures, animals, and objects, 
employing various materials and media. 

Art 202— Drazuing and Painting (0-6-3). 
A continuation of Art 201. 



I 



COURSE OFFERINGS 95 

Art 203— Drawino and Pnintivo (0-6-3). 
A continuation of Art 202. 

Art 290— History of Art (5-0-5). 

A survey of world art from ancient times through the Baroque. 

Art 29\— History of Art (5-0-5). 

A survey of world art from the end of the seventeenth century 
to the present. 

Art 320 — Art for the Elementary Teacher (4-2-5). 

A study of materials and methods for teaching art at the ele- 
mentary school level. 

Art ZOl— Ceramics (3-4-5). 

An introductory course in the fundamentals of pottery, clay, 
modeling, glazing and firing methods. 

Art 302— Ceramics (3-4-5). 

A continuation of Art 301 with emphasis on the potter's wheel, 
and the study of glaze materials. 

Art 303— Ceramics (3-4-5). 

A continuation of Art 302 with emphasis on the potter's wheel 
and an introduction to elementary ceramic technology. 

Course Offerings 
Music 

Theoretical Courses 

Music 1\0—Music Theory (3-0-3). Fall. 

An introduction to the basic theoretical principles of music. 

Music HI — Musics Theory (3-0-3). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 110 with emphasis on part-writing of 
triads and their inversions. 

Music 112 — Music Theory (3-0-3). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 111 through inversions of the dominant 
seventh chord and secondary seventh chords. 

Music lOl—Sight Singing (2-0-1). Fall. 

A study of sight singing techniques applied to diatonic materials. 

Music 102— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Winter. 
A continuation of Music 101. 



96 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Music 103—Sight Singing (2-0-1). Spring. 
A continuation of Music 102. 

Music 210— Music Theory (3-0-3). Fall. 

A continuation of the study of basic materials with emphasis 
on secondary seventh chords and simple modulation. 

Music 211— Music Theory (3-0-3). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 210 introducing altered chords and 
modulation to remote keys. 

Music 212 — Music Theory (3-0-3). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 211 emphasizing chromatic materials. 

Music 201— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Fall. 

A study of sight singing techniques applied to chromatic mate- 



rials. 



Music 202— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Winter. 
A continuation of Music 201. 

Music 203— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Spring. 
A continuation of Music 202. 



The study of the formal prmciples of music as exemplified in 
musical works of various style periods. 



Music 312 — Form and Analysis (3-0-3). 

The study of the formal prmciples of i 
ical works of various style periods. 

Music ^11— Counterpoint (5-0-5). (Not offered 1967-68). 

A study of the contrapuntal techniques of Renaissance and 
Baroque music. 

Music 412— 20th Century Materials (3-0-3). (Not offered 1967- 
68). 

A study of the materials and techniques of 20th Century music. 

Music 450— Orchestration (3-0-3). (Not offered 1967-68). 

An introduction to the techniques of scoring for instrumental 
ensembles and the orchestra. ■ 

Music 350— Conducting (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the problems and techniques of conducting. 



Music 320 — Music for the Elementary Teacher (5-0-5). 

An introduction to music skills and materials for the elementary 
classroom teacher. 



I 



COURSE OFFERINGS 97 

History and Literature Courses 

Music 200 — Music Appreciation (5-0-5). 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy 
fine music by analysis of form, style and mediums of musical expres- 
sion from the great periods of musical art. Lectures, discussions and 
recorded sessions comprise the course. 

Music 310— Music History (5-0-5). 

The history of music in Western civilization from its origins 
through the Baroque period. 

Music 311 — Music History (5-0-5). 

The history of music in Western civilization from the Baroque 
period to the present. 

Music 312— Opera Literature (3-0-3). (Not offered 1967-68). 

A study of operatic masterpieces from the origin of the form to 
the present. 

Music 321 — Music of the Renaissance (3-0-3). (Not offered 
1967-68). 

The development of music from 1450 to 1600. 

Music 322— Music of the Baroque (3-0-3). (Not offered 1967- 
68). 

The development of music from 1600 to 1750. 

Applied Music Courses 

Applied music courses consist of one or two twenty-five minute 
private lessons per week. A special fee of $24.00 for one lesson per 
week or $48.00 for two lessons per week per quarter is applicable. 

No Music major will be permitted to register for applied music 
courses for credit until he has reached an adequate level of pro- 
ficiency in his instrument. The standard of such proficiency will be 
set by the Fine Art Department, and the level of achievement in the 
individual case will be determined by examination. 

Music 130, 131, 132; 230, 231, 232; 330, 331, 332; 430, 431, 432 
— Applied Music. One hour credit per quarter. One twenty-five 
minute private lesson per week. 

Music 140, 141, 142; 240, 241, 242; 340, 341, 342; 440, 441, 442 
— Applied Music. Two hours credit per quarter. Two twenty-five 
minute private lessons per week. 



98 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

French 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

deography 

(See listing under Department of History and Political Science) 

German 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY & 

POLITICAL SCIENCE i 

Professor Roy Carroll, Head; Professors Beecher and Wu; Associate 

Professors Coyle, Haunton, Lanier; Assistant Professors 

Comaskey, Duncan, McCarthy, Patterson, Ro. 

Departmental Requirements for the Major in History 

Students planning to major in history are urgently advised to 
take such courses as will satisfy the basic college requirements for 
the Bachelor of Arts degree during the Freshman and Sophomore 
years. Those planning to continue their study of history in graduate 
school are advised to select French or German as their language. 
The minimum requirement in addition to History 114 and 115 for a 
major in history is forty quarter hours from history courses num- 
bered 300 or above. In selecting courses for a major, the student may 
elect to emphasize the history of the United States, or the history 
of Europe, but he may not present a major exclusively in either of 
these areas. 

Required courses: History 114, 115, and 300, but History 114^ 
and 115 may not be counted in the forty quarter hours required for 
the major. It is the policy of the department to advise all history 
majors to register for History 300 in the first quarter of their Junior 
year or in the first quarter after they elect to major in history. 

The major program must also include proficiency in a foreign 
language equivalent to courses 101 through 104, and 25 quarter hours 
of courses, approved by the department, from these related fields: 
History of Art and Music, Economics, Literature, Philosophy, Political 
Science, and Sociology. 



COURSE Oil ERINGS 99 

Course Offerings 
History 

History 114 — History of Western Civilization. (5-0-5). 

A chronological survey of the main currents of political, social, 
religious, and intellectual activity in western civilization from the 
time of the ancient Mediterranean civilization to 1715. 

History 115 — History of Western Civilization. (5-0-5). 

A continuation of History 114 down to the present. 

History 300 — Problems in Historiography. (5-0-5). 

A study of the nature and meaning of history, some of the prob- 
lems involved in the writing and study of history, and selected 
interpretations. 

History 320 — The Civilization of China and the Far East, Part I. 
(5-0-5). 

The history of East Asian civilization from ancient times through 
the eighteenth century, with special emphasis on characteristic politi- 
cal, economic, and social developments. 

History 321 — The Civilization of China and the Far East, Part 
II. (5-0-5). 

The history of East Asian nations from the nineteenth century 
to the present, with emphasis on political, social, economic, and in- 
tellectual developments. 

History 322— History of Japan. (5-0-5). 

A survey of the history of Japan, with major emphasis placed 
upon the development of Japan since 1600. 

History 323 — History of India and South Asia. (5-0-5). 

A survey of the civilization of South and South-east Asia, with 
principal attention given to India since 1600. 

History 329— History of Russia to 1917. (5-0-5). 

A survey of Russian history during the Kievan, Tatar, Muscovite, 
and Imperial eras. 

History 330 — Twentieth Century Russia. (5-0-5). 

An examination of the forces leading to the downfall of Tsarist 
Russia, the Bolshevik Revolution, and the political, economic, and 
social history of the Soviet era. 



I 



100 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

History 3^1— History of England, 1450-1690. (5-0-5). 

Emphasis is given to the constitutional, religious, and economic 
developments, but social and intellectual phases are treated. 

History 343— Medieval Europe, 395-1350. (5-0-5). I 

A study of Europe from the fourth to the fourteenth century^ 
with particular attention to social, economic, and religious develop- 
ments. 

History 345 — The Late Middle Ages and Renaissance (5-0-5). 

The history of Europe from c. 1300 to 1517 with special emphasis 
on the political, cultural, and intellectual developments which trans- 
formed medieval society into Renaissance men. 

History 347 — The French Revolution and Napoleon. (5-0-5). 

An investigation of the ideas and events of the Old Regime and 
the Enlightenment in France; emphasis is also on the impact of the 
French Revolution and the career of Napoleon upon the major Euro- 
pean nations. 

History 34S— The History of Europe from 1815 to 1900. (5-0-5). 

A study of the most important social, political, and intellectual 
directions of European history from the Congress of Vienna to the 
end of the nineteenth century. 

History 350 — Europe in the Twentieth Century. (5-0-5). 

A study of the major developments in Europe since 1900, with 
emphasis upon the origins and impact of the First and Second World 
Wars. 

History 351 — American History to 1865. (5-0-5). 

A general survey of the political, economic, and social history 
of the United States to the end of the Civil \Var. 

History 352 — American History Since 1865. (5-0-5). 

A general survey of the political, economic, and social history 
of the tJnited States from 1865 to the present. 

History 354 — Social and Intellectual History of the United States 
Since 1865. (5-0-5). 

An examination of political theory, social development, and the 
principal trends of American thought since 1065. 



\ 



COURSE OFFERINGS 101 

History 355 — Studies in American Diplomacy. (5-0-5). 

Studies of American objectives and policies in foreign affairs 
from colonial times to the present. 

History 356 — American Constitutional History. (5-0-5). 

A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the Constitu- 
tion of the United States. 

History 357~The Old South. (5-0-5). 

The coloniel South through secession; development and opera- 
tion of the plantation system; emergence of the ante-bellum social 
and political patterns of the region. 

History 358— The Nezu South. (5-0-5). 

Emphasis is placed upon the social, economic, and political 
readjustments of the late nineteenth century, and the impact of 
industrialism and liberalism in the twentieth century. 

History 359 — Civil War and Reconstruction. (5-0-5). 

The causes and significance of the American Civil War, with 
minor consideration of the military campaigns; political, economic 
and social aspects of Reconstruction. 

History 360 — Recent American History. (5-0-5). 

Beginning with the presidency of Rutherford B. Hayes, the course 
will emphasize populism and progressivism, the period between the 
wars, and postwar readjustment. 

History 361 — Great Historians. 5 quarter hours. (5-0-5). 

The course is designed to acquaint the student with major his- 
torians and historical philosophies through individual reading under 
the direction of the instructor. 

History 362 — Independent Study. (5-0-5). 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual re- 
search and reading in some field of history under the supervision 
of a member of the staff. Emphasis will be on wide reading, confer- 
ences with the adviser, and written reports and essays. Open only to 
seniors with a B average in history and in their overall work. Admis- 
sion will be subject to approval of the individual adviser and of the 
Head of the Department of History. 

Geography 

Geography 111 — -World Human Geography. (5-0-5). 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic activi- 



102 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

ties and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 

Philosophy 

Philosophy llO—Introduction to Philosophy. (5-0-5). 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of 
philosophy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the 
relation of philosophy to art, science and religion. Includes a survey 
of the basic issues and major types of philosophy, and shows their 
sources in experience, history and representative thinkers. 

Philosophy 301. — History of Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval. 

An historical introduction to philosophy, tracing the develop- 
ment of European philosophy from the early Greeks through the 
Renaissance. 

Philosophy 302 — History of Philosophy: Modern. (5-0-5). 

A continuation of Philosophy 301 from the seventeenth century 
to the present. 

Philosophy 320 — Introduction to Oriental Philosophy. (5-0-5). 

Political Science i 

Political Science 113 — Government of the United States. (5-0-5). 

A study is made of the structure, theory, and functions of the 
national government in the United States and some of the major 
problems of the state and local government. The course shows how 
developmental practice has created our government as it stands 
today. 

Political Science 300 — Political Behavior. (5-0-5). 

This course emphasizes the economic, psychological, and social 
aspects of political behavior. It examines the concepts of power, roles 
groups, elites, decision-making, political communications, and sys- 
tems analysis. Consideration is also given to the basic theories, vari- 
ables, and hypotheses used in empirical research in political science. 

Political Science 301 — Comparative Government. (5-0-5). 

An analytical and comparative study of the major European 
governments, with principal emphasis upon the analysis of the con- 
ditions which lead to effective and stable parliamentary government, 
and those which lead to the inefficiency, instability and breakdown 
of such systems. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 103 

Political Science 302 — Comparative Government: Asia. (5-0-5). 

A continuation of Political Science 301, with emphasis on the 
political institutions and problems of government in Asian nations. 

Political Science 303^ — Introduction to Political Science. (5-0-5). 

This course deals with the area of political science as a discipline, 
and serves as an introduction to the systematic study of modern 
government. Attention is given to the role of politics in society; the 
nature and origins of the state; the nature and development of politi- 
cal institutions; the bases of political action; and the theories, forms 
and processes of government. Required of all political science majors. 

Political Science 304 — Public Administration. (5-0-5). 

This is a one quarter course that is primarily concerned with 
organizational theory and bureaucratic behavior, whether public or 
private, but with an emphasis on the behavior of the bureaucracy 
of the national government. This course will also be concerned with 
the political process as it unfolds in the administration of laws enacted 
by the Congress. A number of case studies on the subject will be 
examined in some detail. 

Political Science 305 — State and Local Government. (5-0-5). 

This course is concerned primarily with the political process 
and the behavior of political actors at the local and state levels of 
government primarily in the United States. It is concerned with the 
techniques and research results of the relevant empirical literature 
that has evolved over the past 15 years in the field; i.e., local com- 
munity studies of Floyd Hunter, Robert A. Dahl, and others. 

Political Science 306 — International Law. (5-0-5). 

An introduction to selected public international law topics in- 
cluding: recognition, state succession, jurisdiction, extradition, na- 
tionality, the law of treaties, the law of diplomacy, and the law of 
war. 

Political Science 307 — Constitutional Law. (5-0-5). 

A study of the development of the United States government 
through judicial interpretation of the Constitution. The case study 
method of analysis is used, but some attention is given also to recent 
behavioral writings on judicial decision-making. Prerequisite: Po- 
litical Science 113, or equivalent. 

Political Science 319 — International Relations. (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the theories, forces and practices dominating 
contemporary international relations. 



104 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Political Science 320 — International Relations: The Far East. 
(5-0-5). 

Political Science 331-332— Political Theory. (5-0-5). 

An historical study of the development of ideas relative to the 
state and government from Socrates and Plato to the present. Atten- 
tion is directed primarily to the political thought of a selected group 
of eminent philosophers. 

Political Science 331 — From Socrates to the 17th Century (5-0-5). 

Political Science 332 — From the 17th Century to the Present. 
(5-0-5). 

DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 

Professor Hugh Pendexter III, Head; Professors Anchors, Lubs, Scale, 

Strozier; Associate Professor White; Assistant Professors Bakker, 

Brooks, Carr, Chew, Ramsey and Welsh: Instructor Ferguson. 

Departmental Requirements for the Major in English 

A student majoring in English must complete at least 40 hours 
of upper-division courses (300-400 level) in the major field, of which 
at least 15 hours must be on the 400 level. A major program must 
include at least one of the starred courses in each of the following 
groups: 

I. Shakespeare (404*) 

II. English Literature before 1700 (301*, 302*, 321, 402, 403) 

III. English Literature after 1700 (303*, 305*, 306*, 307*, 311, 
312,322) 

IV. American Literature (309*, 310*, 313, 322) 

V. Comparative Literature or English Language (314*, 318*, 
322*, 325*, 332*, 333* 410*; Chinese 233, French 201, 

227) 

The major shall select one area of specialization from groups 
II-IV and complete at least two additional courses in that area 
(starred or unstarred). English 400 and 490 may, depending on the 
subject, be counted in any area of specialization. 

The major program must also include proficiency in a foreign 
language equivalent to courses 101 through 104, and 25 quarter 
hours of courses, approved by the major department, from these 
related fields: literature in a foreign language, history, philosophy, 
art, music, speech. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 105 

Course Offerings 
Chinese 

Chinese lO\-l02~ElrmeTitary Chmese (10-0-10). (Not offered 
1967-1968). 

A basic training in Chinese conversation and reading. 

Chinese 201 — Intermediate Chinese (5-0-5). (Not offered 1967- 
68). 

Chinese 233— CJiinese Literature in Translation (5-0-5). (Not 
offered 1967-68). 

English 

Students will be assigned to freshman English according to re- 
sults of tests taken before the beo^inninsr of the term. 

English 100 — Fujidamentals of Composition (3-4-5). 

This is the study and practice of sentence and paragraph structure. 
Students must learn to write clearly, logically, coherently, and correctly. 
In the 2-hour reading laboratory students work to improve reading 
comprehension. In the 2-hour writing laboratory they practice in 
composition. 

English 101 — Composition (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Assignment 
to this course is based on entrance test results or the successful com- 
pletion of English 99. English 101 must be completed with a grade of 
"C" in order to enter English 102. A library paper is written during 
the term. 

English 102 — Greek Literature and the Bible (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: English 101. 

Emphasis in composition is on critical papers longer than 1,000 
words. Reading assignments are from classical epics and tragedy, 
and the Bible. 

English 103 — Honors Composition (5-0-5). 

Instruction in this course will not follow the traditional lecture 
method only; the students will read and write a research paper (or 
papers) in the fashion which the instructor thinks will best discipline 
them for independent study. 

English 104 — Honors Composition and Introduction to Literature 
(5-0-5). 



106 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



In this course the students will read material in addition to the 
literature assigned for English 102 and write critical papers on topics 
selected from the periods covered. 

English 201 — Shakespeare and Literature through the 19th 
Century (5-0-5). Prerequisite: English 101, English 102. Literary 
masterpieces from 1400-1850. 

English 202 — Modern World Literature (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
English 101, English 102, English 201. 

Literary masterpieces 1850 to present. 
Speech Courses 

English 221— Theatre Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Practical experience in theatre. The student will work on the 
Masquer's production of the quarter. Only one hour's credit may be 
earned per quarter. The maximum total credit allowed in Theatre 
Laboratory is five quarter hours. 

English 228 — Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5). 

Practice and theory of oral communication. Each student makes 
several major speeches. The physiology of the speech mechanism is 
covered, and articulation is studied within the framework of the In- 
ternational Phonetic Alphabet. 

English 341 — Oral Interpretation (5-0-5). 

A practical course in the oral interpretation of poetry and prose. 
The techniques of literature analysis are stressed along with the vocal 
techniques needed to communicate an author's mood and meaning. 
Period Courses (poetry and prose, with a slight sampling of drama). 

English 301 — (5-0-5) Renaissance -yidloiy through Spenser. 

English 302— (5-0-5) 77^/1 C^ntwr>' - Donne through Milton. 

English 303— (5-0-5) Restoration and 18th Century- 1660-1798. 

English 305— (5-0-5) 19th Century L Romantics 

English 306 — (5-0-5) 19th Century IL Victorian 

English 307— (5-0-5) Twentieth Century British 

English 308 — (5-0-5) American Literature j beginning through 
Twain 

English 310 — (5-0-5) American Literature from the rise of Na- 
turalism to the present 

English 332 — (5-0-5) Medieval and Renaissance European Lit- 






I 



erature 



II 



COURSE OFFERINGS 107 

English 333 — (5-0-5) Modern European Literature 
Genre Courses 

English 331 — (5-0-5) Children's Literature (will not apply to- 
ward English major.) 

English 313 — (5-0-5) American Novel 

English 314 — (5-0-5) The European Novel 

English 318 — (5-0-5) Greek and Roman Drama in Translation 

English 321— (5-0-5) English Drama to 1850 (excluding Shake- 
speare) 

English 322 — (5-0-5) Modern British, American, and Continen- 
tal Drama, Ibsen to present 

English 325 — (5-0-5) Advanced Grammar — An objective exami- 
nation of the structural patterns of modern English by application of 
the new analytic and descriptive methods. (Not a review of traditional 
grammar.) 

English 375— (5-0-5) The British Novel 
Senior Courses 

English 400— (1-5) -0-( 1-5) Seminar 

English 402— (5-0-5) Milton (Not offered 1967-68) 

English 403— (5-0-5) Chaucer 

English 404 — (5-0-5) Shakespeare 

English 410 — (5-0-5) History of the English Language 

English 490— (1-5) -0-( 1-5) Independent Study 

* French 

French \^\-\Q2-\02>— Elementary French (15-0-15) 

A course for beginners. The approach is primarily oral^ and daily 
practice with tape recordings is required. Students who own tape 
. machines may have tapes recorded for home practice. 

r! No credit for graduation or transfer will be given until the 

sequence is completed. 

French 110 — Elementary French (3-0-3) 

French 111 — Elementary French (3-0-3) 

French 112 — Elementary French (4-0-4) 

♦See footnote on page 109. 



108 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



These are the same courses as French 101-102 above, but more 
is allowed for covering the work, 
these sections on advice of the instructor. 



time is allowed for covering the work. Students will be enrolled for 



Frejich 104 — Intermediate French (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Three 
quarters of college French or three years of high school French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 201 — French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Se- 
lected plays of Comeille, Moliere and Racine. 

French 227 — French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: French 104. A study of Romantic prose, poetry, 
and drama, with lectures and discussions in French. 



*G 



ernian 



German \0\-\Q2-\0?>— Elementary German (15-0-15) 

Drill upon pronunciation and elements of grammar, conversa- 
tion and the training of the ear as well as the eye. German is used 
as much as practicable in the classroom instruction. The course in- 
cludes reading of texts and translations, conversations, dictation, and 
dialogues. 

No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is completed. 

German 110 — Elementary German (3-0-3). Fall 

German 111 — Elemeiitary German (3-0-3). Winter 

German 112 — Elementary German (4-0-4). Spring 

These are the same courses as German 101 - 102 above, but more 
time is allowed for covering the work. Students will be enrolled for 
these sections on advice of the instructor. 

German 104 — Intermediate German, (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Three 
quarters of college German or three years of high school German. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 



•See footnote on page 109. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 109 

* Spanish 

Spanish m\-\02— Elementary (10-0-10). 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 

the elements of Spanish reading, composition and con\'ersation. No 
credit for graduation will be given until sequence is completed. 

Spanish 103— Elementray (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Two quarters of college Spanish or two years of 
high school Spanish. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammer, conversation and readings. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professor Lane Hardy, Head; Professors Sanchez-Diaz, Stubbs, 
Winn; Associate Professor Laffer; Assistant Professors Semmes, Under- 
wood. 

All degree programs require at least 10 hours of mathematics. 
This requirement may be satisfied in any one of three ways: 

(a) For LIBERAL ARTS MAJORS (English, history, etc.) : 
Mathematics 105 and any one of these courses: Mathematics 
106, 107, 108, 109. 

(b) For SOCIAL SCIENCE MAJORS (psychology, sociology, 
business administration, etc.): Mathematics 101 and 
Mathematics 111. 

(c) For SCIENCE MAJORS (physics, chemistry, mathematics, 
etc.) : Mathematics 103 and Mathematics 104. 

Students should consult with the department of their major for 
possible variations on the above options (a), (b), (c). 

Departmental Requirements for the Major in Mathematics 

A major in mathematics will consist of at least 6 courses (30 
qtr. hrs.) beyond the calculus sequence (Mathematics 104-201-202- 
203). Normally a student would accomplish this as follows: Mathe- 



•Studcnts who have studied a foreit^n language in high school will be placed in college 
courses according to tests given before the fall quarter. 



110 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

matics 311-312; 321-322; and at least one of the sequences: 301- 
302; 401-402. 

Every major program must include Mathematics 311-312 and 
at least one of these sequences: 301-302; 401-402. A student may, 
however, substitute for the 321-322 sequence. 

It is recommended that a mathematics major support his work 
in mathematics with at least 15 qts. hrs. of approved elective courses 
in related fields. 

Course Offerings 
Engineering 

Engineering Graphics 113 — (0-6-2). 

Topics of study include lettering (capital and lower case) ; the 
use of the instruments; geometric construction; orthographic projec- 
tion; emphasis on descriptive geometry concepts as applied to the 
solution of problems involving orthographic projection of solids, 
auxiliary' views, and points, lines and planes. 

Engineering Graphics 114 — (0-6-2). Prerequisite 113. 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points, 
lines and planes by use of the revolution method; intersection of sur- 
faces; warped surfaces: the development of surfaces. Practical appli- 
cations are emphasized. 

Engineering Graphics 115 — (0-6-2). Prerequisite, 114. 

Topics of study include sections and conventions; dimensioning; 
pictorial representation; detail sketches; shop processes; assembly 
drawings from detail sketches; working pictorial sketches; introduc- 
tion to charts and graphs; reproduction processes, ink tracing on cloth; 
graphical calculus. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 101 — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Sets, functions and their graphs, equations, logarithm and ex- 
ponential functions, polynomials, right triangle trigonometry, elemen- 
tary statistics and probability. 

Mathematics 103 — Pre-Calculus Mathematics (5-0-5). Fall, Win- 
ter, Spring. Prerequisites: SAT scores of 500 or better on both verbal 
and mathematics, 8 semesters of high school mathematics or its equi- 
valent (algebra 1, 2, Geometry, Trigonometry) ; or a grade of C or 
better in Mathematics 101. 



I 






COURSE OFFERINGS 111 



Sets, functions, graphs, real numbers, polynomial functions, trig- 
onometric functions, inverse functions. 

Mathematics 104 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5) . Fall, 
Spring. Prerequisites: Satisfactory qualifying score on the C.E.E.B. 
Advanced Placement Test Level I or (this applies for the academic 
year 1967-1968 only) a satisfactory score on the Armstrong Calculus 
Placement Test (given during the orientation week of the Fall quarter 
— 1967 only) or a grade of C or better in Mathematics 103. 

The real numbers (especially the completeness property), co- 
ordinate systems, introduction to the integral, areas, differential cal- 
culus, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. 

Mathematics 105 — An Introduction to Modern Mathematics I. 
(5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

This course and Mathematics 106, 107, 108, 109 are designed 
to introduce the non-science major to modern mathematical concepts 
and to suggest an appropriate cultural setting for the subject. 

Mathematics 106 — An Introduction to Modern Mathematics IIj 
Abstract Algebra. (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 105 or consent of instructor. 

This course as well as Mathematics 107, 108, 109 will proceed 
in the same spirit as Mathematics 105. A specific area of mathematics 
will be studied in an effort to acquaint the liberal arts student with 
the work of contemporary mathematicians. Appropriate topics will be 
selected from one of the following areas: Abstract algebra, modern 
geometry, analysis, mathematics logic. 

Mathematics 107 — An Introduction to Modern Mathematics II, 
Logic (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 105 or consent of instructor. 

Mathematics 108 — An Introduction to Modern Mathematics II, 
Geometry (5-0-5. Prerequisite: Mathematics 105 or consent of in- 
structor. 

Mathematics 109. — An Introduction to Modern Mathematics II, 
Analysis (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 105 or consent of in- 
structor. 

Mathematics 111 — Elementary Statistics (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, 
Spring. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 or its equivalent. 

Mathematics 201 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104. 

The differential and integral calculus of exponential, logarithmic 
and inverse trigonometric functions, elementary differential equations, 
algebra of vectors. 



112 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Mathematics 202 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. 

Some vestor analysis, analytic geometry of two and three dimen- 
sions, conies, polar and cylindrical coordinates, the Mean-Value 
Theorem, Cauchy's Theorem, Taylor polynomials. 

Mathematics 203 — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. 

Problems involving extrema, the theorems of L'Hopital and ap- 
plications, infinite sequences and series. The solution of linear ordinary 
differential equations both by operator methods and series. 

Mathematics 235 — Finite Mathematics (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 101. 

Mathematics 301, 302, 303 — Advanced Calculus (5-0-5). Prereq- 
uisite: Mathematics 203. 

Mathematics 305 — Differential Equations (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 201. 

Mathematics 311, 312, 313 — Abstract Algebra (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 203. 

Mathematics 321, 322, 323 — Projective and Related Geometries 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Mathematics 401, 402, A()Z—Real Variables (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 203 and consent of instructor. 

Mathematics 411, 412 — Complex Variables (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 203. (Not offered in 1967-68). 

Mathematics 421, 422 — Numerical Analysis (5-0-5) . Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 203. (Not offered in 1967-68). 

Mathematics 452 — Basic Ideas of Arithmetic (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 105. 

This course is designed to give elementary teachers a clear under- 
standing of the fundamental ideas of arithmetic and to acquaint them 
with the material currently being used in the elementary schools. 

Mathematics 490 — Seminar (1-0-1). 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 

Assoc. Professor Doris Bates, R.N., Director; Instructors Rose Marie 

Blase, R.N., Anne Mayer, R.N., Sybil Wilson, R.N., 

Nancy Duffy, R.N., Barbara Rundbaken, R.N. 

The Associate of Arts Degree Program in Nursing provides the 
student with the opportunity to obtain a general education and to 



COURSE OFFERINGS 113 

study nursing at the college level. Graduates are eligible to take the 
State Examination for licensure to practice as registered nurses. 

The musing educational program is developed by progressing 
from simple to complex situations in nursing which evolve from basic 
concepts fiuidamcntal to the total needs of the individual. 

Student nurses participate in nursing laboratoiy experiences at 
Memorial Hospital of Chatham County, the Warren A. Candler Hos- 
pitals, and other community agencies. Students are assigned to the 
clinical area and are responsible for providing their own transporta- 
tion. Continuation in the program second quarter is dependent upon 
maintaining a 2.0 average first quarter. 

Students who enroll in this program have opportunities for per- 
sonal, intellectual, and socio-ethical development, as well as having 
the personal satisfaction of becoming a member of a professional group 
which has unlimited opportunities after graduation. 

Freshman Course Sophomore Course 

Qtr. Hrs. Qtr. Hrs. 

English 101 5 Sociology 201 5 

Chemistry 105 5 Nursing 201 10 

Nursing 101 7 History 351 5 

Psychology 201 5 Nursing 202 . 10 

Zoology 108 5 P.E. 208 1 

Nursing 102 7 Humanities Elective 5 

Psychology 305 5 Nursing 203 10 

Zoology 109 5 P.E. 113 1 

Nursing 103 7 Nursing 204 10 

Nutrition 101 . 5 P.E. 204 . 1 

Microbiology 201 5 — 

Nursing 104 . 7 



Course Offerings — Freshman 

Nursing 101 — Fundamentals of Nursing, and 

Nursing lOlL — Selected Laboratory Experiences. (5-4-7). 

The underlying philosophy of this introductory course is that the 
logical approach to the care of the sick is through a developmental 
path based on a patient's typical day. Sound principles of professional 
ethics and the historical development of the nursing profession are 
correlated. Students are given opportunity to develop beginning nurs- 
ing skills, to understand and apply basic principles, and to identify 



114 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

nursing care needs of individual patients. Clinical experience in com- 
munity hospitals is given under supervision. 

Nursing 102 — Introduction to Care of the Physically III, and 

Nursing 102L — Selected Laboratory Experiences. (5-4-7). Pre- 
requisite: Nursing 101. 

This course is a continuation of Fundamentals of Nursing. The 
students develop more complicated nursing skills and an awareness of 
the interrelatedness of medical-surgical nursing problems, and the 
sociological, physiological, and psychological needs of the patients. 
The problemsolving technique is introduced. Selected nursing practice 
is provided in applying the principles of comprehensive care to patients 
in the hospital. 

Nursing 103 — Nursing in Maternal — Child Health, and 

Nursing 103L — Selected Laboratory Experiences. (4-6-7). Pre- 
requisite: Nursing 102. 

This first course in Maternal and Child Health emphasizes the 
study of the care and development of the child and the effect of illness 
during the growing years on individual development and that of the 
family. Beginning with conception through childhood and adole- 
scence, this course will establish the framework of knowledge for the 
study of the nursing needs of the individual and the family that will 
be developed during the curriculum. Laboratory experience is planned 
selectively and utilizes agencies concerned with children and their 
families. 

Nursing 104 — Nursing in Maternal — Child Health, and 

Nursing 104L — Selected Laboratory Experiences. (4-6-7). Pre- 
requisite: Nursing 103. 

This course is a continuation of learning in maternal and child 
health nursing. It is designed to assist the student in the application of 
appropriate principles to care of the obstetrical patient, beginning with 
conception through the prenatal period, labor and delivery, post 
partum, and the care of the newborn infant. Emphasis is placed on 
problems occurring during this period. 

Course Offerings — Sophomore 

Nursing 201 — Nursing in Mental-Physical Illness, and 

Nursing 201L — Selected Laboratory Experiences. (5-10-10). Pre- 
requisite: Nursing 104. 

Nursing in Mental-Physical Illness is an integrated study of the 
typical problems interrupting the human life cycle from adolescence 



COURSE OFFERINGS 115 

to middlc-agc. In the pliysical illness nursing units, emphasis is placed 
on meeting the nursing needs of these medical-surgical })atients. In the 
mental illness units, emphasis is placed on meeting the nursing needs 
of the people in all age groups with emotional disorders. Selected ex- 
periences with hospitalized patients are provided each student to 
reinforce his/her learning. 

Nursing 202 — Nursing in Physical Illness I and 

Nursing 202L — Selected Laboratory Experiences. (5-10-10). Pre- 
requisite: Nursing 201. 

Nursing in Physical Illness I continues to follow the adult human 
life cycle. Emphasis is placed on exploring the typical problems of 
middle age. Selected experiences with patients are provided each 
student to reinforce his/her learning, related to the care of the 
chronically or acutely ill medical surgical patient. 

Nursing 203 — Nursing in Physical Illness II and 

Nursing 203L — Selected Laboratory Experiences. (5-10-10). Pre- 
requisite: Nursing 202. 

Nursing in Physical Illness II is a continuation of the study of the 
typical problems interrupting the adult human life cycle from middle 
age, through senescence to death. 

Selected experiences with patients are provided each student to 
reinforce theoretical learnino^. 

Nursing 204 — Advanced Nursing Problems. (Seminar). Prerequi- 
site: Nursing 203. 

Nursing 204L — Selected Lab orator atory Experiences (2-16-10). 

Legal responsibilities and current trends in nursing are explored 
as well as the role of the beginning nurse. 

Laboratory experiences are designed to enhance breadth and 
depth of knowledge and development of skills in contrast to the 
preceeding courses when emphasis was on the acquisition of new 
knowledge and behaviors. 



Music 

(See listing under Department of Fine Arts) 

Philosophy 

(See listing under Department of History and Political Science) 



116 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Roy J. Sims, Head; Assistant Professors Tapp and Bedwell; 
Instructor Hickman. 

Course Offerings 

Physical Education 111 — Conditioning Course (0-2-1). Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carries, 
road work, duel combatives, and simple games. 

Physical Education 112 — Team Sports [0-2-1) .\^m\.tT. 

Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 113 — Elementary Swimming (0-2-1) . Spring. 

Physical Education 114 — Officiating of Basketball (1-3-2). 
Winter. 

Consists of a study of rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substitute for P. E. 112. 

Physical Education 201 — Elementary Tennis (0-2-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 203 — Senior Life Saving and Instructors' 
Course in Swimming (2-3-2) . Spring. May be substituted for P. E. 113. 

Physical Education 20^— First Aid (3-0-1). Winter. 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid. 

Physical Education 205 — Folk Rhythms (0-2-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 206 — Beginning Modern Dance (0-2-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 207 — Tap Dance for Beginners (0-2-1). 

Physical Education 208 — Adult Recreative Sports (0-2-1). 

Golf, ping-pong, pool, card games, chess, checkers and other 
quiet games. 

Physical Education 232— Bowling (0-2-1). \Vinter. 

Physical Education 233 — Badminton (0-2-1). 

Physical Education 234 — Trampoline (0-2-1). 

The student is taught the proper care and use of the trampoline. 
He learns to perform the following skills: seat drop, knee drop, front 



COURSE OFFERINGS 117 



drop, back drop, pull over, cradle, turntable, swivel hips, spotting, 
and somersault. 

Physical Education 236 — Intermediate Modern Dance (0-2-1). 
Prerequisite : P. E. 206. 

A continuation of Physical Education 206 with emphasis on 
dynamics, composition and choregraphy. 

Physical Science 

(See listing under Department of Chemistry and Physics) 

Physics 

(See listing under Department of Chemistry and Physics) 

PoHtical Science 

(See listing under Department of History and Political Science) 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY & 
SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Robert H. Cormack, Head; Professor Thompson; 
Assistant Professors Arger and Davidson 

Students who intend to major in Psychology should complete 
Psychology 201-202 before the end of their sophomore year. They 
should also complete Zoology 101-102 and Mathematics 103-111-235 
as early as possible. 

Course Offerings 
Anthropology 

Anthropology 201 — Man and His Culture (5-0-5) . 

An introduction to the study of man as a cultural animal, the 
development of human societies from preliterate beginnings, the 
rise of complex social organizations with an outline study of the 
major cultures developed by man. 

Psychology 

Psychology 201 — Introductory Psychology I (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the vocabulary, concepts and methods of 
the science of behavior. Discussion and experiments focus on the 



118 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



problems of perception, learning and motivation. Psychology 201 
is prerequisite to all other courses in psychology. 

Psychology 202 — Introductory Psychology II (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Psychology 201. 

An extension of Psychology 201. The fundamentals of intelligence, 
personality, emotion and interpersonal behavior are introduced. 

Psychology 301 — Educational Psychology (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Psychology 201. 

The application of behavioral science to the problems of learn- 
ing in the classroom. Primarily for teacher preparation. 

Psychology 307 — Experimental Psychology I. Perception (4-2-5). 
Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 

An experimental-theoretical approach to the nature of perception. 
Special attention is given to the psychophysical methods. 

Psychology 308 — Experimental Psychology 11, Learning & Moti- 
vation (4-2-5). Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 

An examination of the methodology and theory associated with 
the various forms of learning and their motivational concomitants. 

Psychology 309 — Experimental Psychology III, Comparative & 
Physiological Psychology (4-2-5). Prerequisite: Psychology 201 and 
Zoology 101-102. 

Introduction to the biological bases of behavior. The structure 
and function of the nervous system is studied and related to the be- 
havior of humans and other organisms. 

Psychology 305 — Developmental Psychology (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Psychology 201. 

An introduction to the nature of genetics and maturational 
variables and their effects on behavior. Emphasis is placed on the 
development of psycho-motor skills, aptitudes and attitudes in the 
human. 

Psychology 311 — Theories of Personality (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Psychology 201. 

A study of selected personality theories v^ith emphasis on normal 
behavior. Attention will be given to both experimental and clinical 
data. The determinants of personality structure and the development 
of personality will be examined from divergent points of view. 

Psychology 303 — Social Psychology (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Psych. 
201. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 119 



The study of the behavior of others as determinants of the behavior 
of the individual. The cultural milieu and group pressure will be ex- 
amined in teiTTis of their effects on behavior. 

Pyschology 310 — History of Psychology (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Psychology 201. 

A study of the basic ideas in psychology from early animism to 
modem behaviorists. Special attention is given to the philosophical 
bases at various times in the history of psychology. 

Sociology 

Sociology 201 — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the concepts and methods of the science of 
human group behavior. Includes the study of socialization, the role 
of the individual in society and the major social institutions and proces- 
ses. 

Sociology 350 — Social Problems (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Soc. 201. 

An examination of behavioral deviancy and social disorganization 
in the context of sociological theory. 

Sociology 351 — Population and Problems (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Sociology 201. 

The study of the methods of population analysis and the factors 
involved in population change. 

Spanish 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

Speech 

(See listing under Department of Language and Literature) 

Zoology 

(See listing under Department of Biology) 



INDEX 

Academic Advisement 48 

Academic Regulations 37- 47 

Accelerated Program, High School ...., 25- 26 

Accounting Major Requirements 79 

Administration, Officers 7 

Admission to Accelerated Program 25- 26 

Admissions 20- 32 

Advanced Placement 22 

Advisement 41- 42 

Alumni Office 11 

Anthropology Course : - 117 

Application Forms 20 

Application Requirements 20- 22 

Art Courses 94- 95 

Associate in Arts 70- 72 

Athletics 54 

Attendance Regulation 44- 45 

Auditing 24- 47 

Bachelor of Arts 56- 57 

Bachelor of Arts Requirements 56- 57 

Bachelor of Business Administration 67- 68 

Bachelor of Science 56- 57 

Bachelor of Science Requirements 56- 57 

Biology Courses 75- 76 

Biology Department ... 74- 78 

Biology Requirements .. 74- 75 

Botany Courses : 76- 77 

Business Administration 79 

Business Education 60- 62 

Calendar 3- 4 

Chemistry Courses 88 

Chemistry Degree Requirements 86 

Chemistry and Physics Department 86 

Chinese Courses 105 

Clubs 54- 55 

Commerce Courses 83- 84 

Commerce-Secretarial Programs 69 

Commission, Armstrong State College 6 

Community Services, Office 18- 19 

Conduct .- 53 

Counselling Services 48 

Course Load 44 

Course Offerings, Index 73 

Dean's List 44 

Degree Requirements, Regulations 42- 43 

120 



INDEX- (CoiitM.) 

Degrees Offered 56- 72 

Economics Courses 84- 85 

Economics Major Requirements 79 

Education Courses 91-92 

Education Degree Requirements 57- 67 

Education Department 91 

Engineering Courses 110 

English Courses 105-107 

English Degree Requirements 104 

Entomolog)' Courses 77 

Evening Classes 18 

Faculty 9- 15 

Fees 33- 36 

Financial Aid 49- 53 

Fine Arts Department 94- 97 

Foreign Students 26- 27 

French Courses 107-108 

Geography Course ...101-102 

German Courses 108 

Heads of Departments 7 

Health 55 

History of College 17- 18 

History Courses 99-101 

History Degree Requirements 98 

History and Political Science Department 98 

Honor System _ 37- 41 

Honors 44 

Housing . .- _ 55 

Language and Literature Department .104-109 

Late Registration Fee 33 

Library 18 

Management Major Requirements 79 

Mathematics Courses 110-112 

Mathematics Degree Requirements 109 

Mathematics Department 109-112 

Medical Technology 69- 70 

Music Courses 95- 97 

Music Degree Requirements 93- 94 

Nursing, A.A. Degree 53-55, 70 

Nursing Courses 113 

Nursing Degree Requirements 113-114 

Nursing Department 112-115 

Organizations 53- 55 

Orientation 48- 49 

Out of State Tuition 33 

121 



INDEX- (Cont'd.) 

Philosophy Courses 102 

Physical Education Courses 116-117 

Physical Education Department 116-117 

Physical Education Program 45 

Physical Science Courses 88- 89 

Physics Courses 89- 91 

Political Science Courses 102-104 

Probation and Dismissal 45- 46 

Psychology Courses 117-119 

Psychology and Sociology Department 117-119 

Publications _ 54 

Readmission of Former Students 24 

Refunds 35- 36 

Regents 5 

Registration 27 

Reports and Grades 43- 44 

Residency Requirements 28- 29 

Scholarships - 49 

Sociology Courses 1 19 

Spanish Courses 109 

Special Students 24 

Staff, Administrative 7 

Student Activity Fee 33 

Student Government 54 

Student Services and Activities 48- 55 

Teacher Education 57- 67 

Transfer Applicants, Requirements 22- 24 

Transient Students 24- 25 

Veterans 27 

Vocational Rehabilitation 27 

Withdrawal 46- 47 

Zoology Courses 77- 78 



122 



<<■■» 



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Bulletin of 

Armstrong State College 

Savannah, Georgia 



A Four- Year College of the 
University System of Georgia 




SUMMER FALL 1968^190^ V^INTER SPRING 
Volume XXIII Number 8 



Membership in 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



1968 


CALENDAR 


1968 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S MTWT F S' 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


1969 


CALENDAR 


1969 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9' 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 








1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



May 


20 


June 


3 




10 




1 1 




12 




14 


July 


4 




8 




15-19 


August 


7-9 




14 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1968-1969 

SUMMER QUARTER, 1968 

Last day for freshman and transfer students 

to file all papers required in the application 

for admission 
Last day for transient students (for Summer 

Quarter only) to file all papers required in 

the application for admission 
Registration 
Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 
Lost day to change classes 
Holiday 

Mid-Term reports due 
Pre-advisements for Fall Quarter 
Examinations 
Graduation 

FALL QUARTER, 1968 

Sept. 1 Last day for freshman and transfer students to 1 

file all papers required in the application 
for admission 
9-12 Freshman Orientation 

18 Advisement for sophomores, juniors and 

seniors 
Registration for returning sophomores, juniors 

and seniors 
Registration for all evening students 
Registration for all new students 

Classes begin 

Lost day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for Winter Quarter 

Go. and U.S. history and government test 

Thanksgiving Holidays 

Examinations 

WINTER QUARTER, 1969 

Nov. 2 Administration of Scholastic Aptitude Test 

for applicants who wish to enroll in January. 
(Deadline for filing application for test is 
October 5, 1968, or October 19, 1968, up- 
on payment of late registration fee.) 







19 


9 a 


m. 


-1 p.m. 


6 p 


m. 


-8 p.m. 
20 


9 a 


m. 


-1 p.m. 
23 
24 
27 


Nov. 




4 

11-15 

18 

28-29 


Dec. 




9-11 


k 







Dec. 



Jan. 



Feb. 



March 



16 



3 

7 
10 

10 
17-21 
12-14 



Last day for freshman and transfer student 
to file all papers required in the applicatioi 
for admission. 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for Spring Quarter 

Examinations 



March 



3 





20 




21 




22 




23 


April 


21 




28 


May 


M 




28-30 


June 


2 


May 


20 


June 


2 




9 




10 




11 




16 


July 


4 




7 




14-17 


August 


6-8 




13 



SPRING QUARTER, 1969 

Last day for freshman and transfer student t 
to file all papers required in the applicatior|l 
for admission 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for Summer and Fall Quarter i 

Honors Day Assembly 

Examinations 

Graduation j 

SUMMER QUARTER, 1969 | 

Last day for freshman and transfer student:! 

to file all papers required in the applicatiori 

for admission ^ 

Last day for transient students (for Summeri 

Quarter only) to file all papers required m 

the application for admission 
Registration I 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit j; 

Last day to change classes 
Holiday 

Mid-term reports due 
Pre-advisement for Fall Quarter 
Examinations 
Graduation 



Sept. 



Dec. 



8-12 

19 

8-10 



FALL QUARTER, 1969 

Last day for freshman and transfer student? 

to file all papers required in the applicatior 

for admission 
Freshman Orientation 
Registration 
Examinations 



I /GOVERNING BOARD. 
^MINISTRATION and FACULTY 

Regents of the University System 



Itate 


WILLIAM S. MORRIS, III 


Augusta 


at Large 


(Jan. 5, 1967 -Jan. 1, 197 A) 




.tate 


JACK ADAIR 


Atlanta 


at Large 


(Jan. 13, 1965 -Jan. 1, 1971) 




tate 


ROY V. HARRIS 


Augusta 


at Large 


(Feb. 17, 1967 -Jan. 1, 197 Jf) 




tate 


JOHN A. BELL, JR. 


Dublin 


at Large 


(Jan. 1, 1963 -Jan. 1, 1970) 




tate 


CAREY WILLIAMS 


Greensboro 


at Large 


(Jan. 1, 1962 -Jan. 1, 1969) 




'irst 


ANTON F. SOLMS, JR. 

(Jan. 1, 1962 -Jan. 1, 1969) 


Savannah 


econd 


JOHN L. SPOONER 
(Jan, 8, 1968- Jan. 1, 1975) 


Donalsonville 


hird 


T. HIRAM STANLEY 

(Jan. 13, 1965 -Jan. 1, 1972) 


Columbus 


ourth 


H. G. PATTILLO 

(Feb. 5, 1965 -Jan. 1, 1970) 


Decatur 


ifth 


W. LEE BURGE 

(Jan. 8, 1968 -Jan. 1, 1975) 


Atlanta 


ixth 


JAMES C. OWEN, JR. 
(Feb. 5, 1965 -Jan. 1, 1971) 


Griffin 


Bventh 


JAMES V. CARMICHAEL 
(Jan. 19, 1966 -Jan. 1, 1973) 


Marietta 


ighth 


JOHN W. LANGDALE 

(Jan. 13, 1961, -Jan. 1, 1971) 


Valdosta 


inth 


JAMES A. DUNLAP 

Jan. 10, 1966 -Jan. 1, 1973) 


Gainesville 


'^nth 


G. L. DICKENS, JR. 
(Feb. 5, 1965 -Jan. 1, 1972) 


Milledgeville 



G 



Regents' Officers 



JOHN W. LANGDALE Chairma 

H. G. PATTILLO Vice-Chaii-ma 

GEORGE L. SIMPSON, JR. ChanceUc 

MARIO J. GOGLIA Vice Chancellor for Researc 

HARRY S. DOWNS Assistant Vice Chancelk 

MARTIN B. ROBERTS Assistant Vice Chancelk 

for Administration and 
Planning 

HENRY G. NEAL Executive Secretar 

JAMES A. BLISSIT Treasun 

FRANK C. DUNHAM Plant and Businei 

Operations 
ROBERT M. JOINER Public Affaii 

Officers of Administration 

Henry L. Ashmore Presides 

Joseph I. Killorin Dean of the Collec 

James T. Rogers Dean of Student Affaii 

Donald D. Anderson Associate Dea 

for Community Strvia 
JuLE C. Rossiter ComptrolU 

Jack H. Padgett Registrc 

Virginia M. Arey Admissions Offici 

Martha DeWitt Director of Financial Ax 

Joseph A. Buck Director of Studer, 

Activitit 
Tom Llewellyn Director of Public Informatio 

Heads of Departments 

Doris Bates Allied Health Servia 

Leslie B. Davenport Biolog 

Orange W. Hall Business Administratio 

Fretwell G. Crider Chemistnj and Physit 

William W. Stokes Educatio 

Hugh Pendexter, III English and Speee 

J. Harry Persse FiJie An 

William L. Easterling Foreign Languagi 

Roy Carroll History and Political Scieru 

F. Lane Hardy MathematU 

Larry Tapp (Acting Head) Physical Educatio 

W. Bryce Hill Police Administratis 

Robert Cormack Psychology and SocioloQ 

Regina Yoast ....:.„ Libraria!^ 



Administrative Staff 

3S Marjorie a. Mosley Secntanj to the Prcsideyit 

S. Elizabeth H. Carter Secretary to the Dean 

of the Collc(/c 

s. Peggy B. Strong Secretary to the Faculty, 

Gamble Buildinq 
:&. Rebecka Pattillo Secretary to the Faculty, 

Science Building 
S. LuciLE M. Williams Secretary to Departtnents 

of Education and Police 
Administration 

;s. Barbara Tankersley Sea-etary to the Dept. of 

Allied Health Sei'vices 
S. Virginia D. Nall Secretary to Dean of Student 

Affairs 
5. Doris Cole Secretary, Office of Student Affairs 

:s. Margaret J. Sharpton Secretary to the Registrar 

:s. Bertis Jones I.B.M. Operator 

:s. Joyce Weldy Secretary to Registrar for 

Records 

S. Betty Clary Secretary to the Associate Dean 1. 5 

for Community Services L— - 

S. Eugenia Edwards Circulation Assistant 

;S. Susie S. Chirbas Assistant Cataloger 

:s. Claire H. Opper Catalog Assistant 

'^. Hazel Thompson Serials Assistant 

:s. Eleanor Salter Secretary to the Librarian 

S. Corinne H. McGee Assistant to the Controller 

:s. Betty DeYoung Secretary to the Comptroller 

IS. Rosemary Anglin Bookkeeper 

ts. Naomi Lantz Cashier 

:hard F. Baker Superintendent, Buildings and 

Grounds 

V Ryan Assistant Superintendent, 

Buildings and Grounds 

lOMAS Nease Manager, Student Center 

ss Elizabeth Pound Manager, Book Store 

s. Jo Weeks . Campus Nurse 

^S. Launa Johns Receptionist, PBX Operator 

LLIAM E. Brown _ Supervisor of Mail 



The Faculty 



BILL E. ALEXANDER, A.B., Morris Harvey College; M.l 
Georgia Southern College 

Athletic Director 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

M. LORRAINE ANCHORS, A.B., M.A., Baylor University 

Professor of English 

DONALD D. ANDERSON, B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.i 
George Peabody College; Ed. D., Auburn University 
Associate Dean for Community Services 

HENRY L. ASHMORE, B.A.E., M.A.E., D.Ed., University 
Florida 

President 

ROBERT L. BACKUS, A. B. A., Beckley College; A.B., Morr 
Harvey College; M.S., Georgia Southern College 
Assistant Athletic Director 
Instructor in Physical Education 

JAN BARKER, B.A., M.A., University of Virginia 
Assistant Professor of English 

ARDELLA PATRICIA BALL, A.B., Fisk University; M.S.L.; 
Atlanta University 

Cataloger 

DORIS W. BATES, B.S., Simmons College; M.S., Boston Univc 
sity 

Head, Department of Allied Health Services 
Associate Professor of Nursing 

GEORGE H. BEDWELL, B.S., Sanford University; M.A. Univ< 
sity of Alabama 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

W. ORSON BEECHER, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.i 
University of Georgia i 

Professor of History 

* JAMES M. BELFORD, B.A., University of the South; M.ES 
University of Georgia 

Instructor in English 

ALEX D. BELTZ, B.A., M.A., Walla Walla College; B.A. of E 
Western Washington State; Ph. D., Michigan State Univ< 
sity 

Associate Professor of Biology 9 



lARYL JEAN BELTZ, B. Mus., University of Southern Califor- 
nia; M. Mus., Lewis and Clark Collect* 

Itistructor hi Ai>})livd Mnsic (PidHo) 

ARVAN K. BHATIA, B.A., M.A., Punjab University; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University 

Professor of Economics 

OY M. BLACKBURN, JR., B.A., Emory University; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Montreal; D.D.S., Emory University School of Den- 
tistry 

Associate Professor of Dental Hygiene 

OSE MARIE BLASE, B.S. in Nursing, Mt. St. Agnes College; 
M.S., University of Maryland 

InstrpActor in Nursing 

[ADALINE P. BONEY, A.B., Winthrop College; M. Ed., Georgia 
Southern College 

Assistant Professor of History 

OHN G. BREWER, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

KENT BROOKS, B.A., M.A., The University of Texas 
Assistant Professor of English 

[OONYEAN S. BROWER, B.S., M.A., University of Massachu- 
setts 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

7AYXAND BROWN, B.S., Emory University; M.S., University 
of Washington 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

OSEPH A. BUCK, B.A., Auburn University; M.S., Florida State 
University 

Director of Student Activities 

tOY CARROLL, B.A., Ouachita Baptist College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Vanderbilt University 

Head, Departmejit of History and Political Science 
Professor of History 

JAMES WALTER CARTER, A.B., M.A., University of Florida 
Instructor in English and Applied Mu^ic (Organ) 

JOSEPH R. CELLI, B.M.E., Hartt College of Music 
Instructor in Applied Mu^ic (Oboe) 

^RANK CHEW, B.A., Georgia Southern College; M.F.A., The 
University of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of English 
Director, ''Masquers" 



i 



CLINTON L. CHINA, B.A., University of Richmond; M.S., No 

Carolina State University; Ph.D., University of Tennesse* 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

ROSS L. CLARK, B.A., Tulane University 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

BERNARD J. COMASKEY, B.A., Fordham College; M.A., N 
York University 

Assistant Professor of History 

IRWIN D. COOLEY, B.S., Duke University; M.S., University 
Florida; Ph.D., University of Texas 

Professor of Mathematics 

ROBERT H. CORMACK, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of C 
cinnati 

Head, Department of Psychology and Sociology 
Professor of Psychology 

WILLIAM E. COYLE, A.B., Emory University; M.A., Georgetoj^ 
University; Ph.D., Florida State University 

Associate Professor of History & Political Science 

FRETWELL G. CRIDER, B.S., Ph.D., University of North Ca: 
lina 

Head, Department of Chemistry and Physics 
Professor of Chemistry 

LESLIE B. DAVENPORT, JR., B.S., College of Charleston; M. 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., University of Geoni 
Head, Department of Biology 
Professor of Biology 

LAMAR W. DAVIS, B.S., M.S., University of South Carolir 
Certified Public Accountant 

Professor of Business Administration 

WILLIAM R. DeCASTRO, B.S., Florida Southern College; M.B.. 
University of Oklahoma 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

MARTHA DeWITT, A.B., Salem College; M.Ed., University 
Virginia 

Director of Financial Aid 

NANCY DUFFY, B.S., University of Iowa 

Instructor in Nursing 

JOHN DONALD DUNCAN, B.S., College of Charleston; Mj, 
University of South Carolina 

Assistant Professor of History 






LIAM L. EASTERLING, B.S., Western Carolina College 
M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Diploma, Sorbonne, France 

Head, Department of Foreign Languages 
Professor of French and Spanish 

RY B. FERGUSON, B.A., Washington State University; M.A., 
University of Washington 

Instnoctor in German 

JLIAN R. FRIEDMAN, B.A., Emory University; LL.B., Uni- 
versity of Georgia; LL.M., New York University 
Instructor in Business Administration 

i:HARD GIBBS, A.B., M.A., University of Alabama 
Assistant Professor of History 

IMIE F. GROSS, B.A., Baylor University; B.D., Southern Bap- 
tist Seminary; M.A., Auburn University 

Assistant Professor of History 

'EDERICK C. HAAS, B.B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Hofstra University 
Associate Professor of Business Administration 

lANGE W. HALL, B.S., Air Force Institute of Technology; 
M.B.A., Hofstra College; Ph.D., University of Florida 
Head, Department of Business Administration 
Professor of Business Administration 

IRISTINE HAMILTON, B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
Instructor in Nursing 

tHN R. HANSEN, B.S., Troy State College, M. Ed., University 
of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

:UTH SIMS HARDEE, B.M., Stetson University; M.S., Florida 
State University 

Instructor in Education 

LANE HARDY, A.B., Oglethorpe University; M.A., Emory 
University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Head, Department of Mathematics 
Professor of Mathematics 

;NRY E. HARRIS, B.S., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Associo.te Professor of Chemistry 

•:HARD HAUNTON, A.B., A.M., Indiana University 
Associate Professor of History 

•EGINALD C. HAUPT, JR., L.L.B., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Business Administration 



*TED HENKLE, Diploma, Julliard School of Music 4| 

Instructor in Applied Music (Violin) 

RAYMOND L. HILL, B.S., United States Military Academy; I;. 
C.E., University of California, M.S., University of Florid. ' 
Assistant Professor of Physics \ 

W. BRYCE HILL, A.B., Northwestern State College; A.B., I 
versity of California 

Head, Department of Police Administration 
Associate Professor of Police Administration 

JOHN S. HINKEL, M.S., University of Florida 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

*PHILIP HOFFMAN, B.B.A., M.B.A., University of Geori 
Certified Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

MAX T. JOHNS, B.B.A., M.B.A., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of Economics 

♦HOLLAND BALL JUDKINS, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy; M.B ., 
University of Pennsylvania 

Instructor in Business Administration 

JOSEPH I. KILLORIN, A.B., St. John's College; M.A., Ph 
Columbia University 

Dean of the College 

*DONALD EDWARD LaBLANC, A.B., M.Ed., Mercer Univerfi 

Instructor in History 

WALTER B. LAFFER, B.S., Case Institute of Technology; Ph. 

Ohio State University 

Professor of Mathematics 






OSMOS LANIER, JR., B.A., LaGrange College; M.A., Au 
University; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Associate Professor of History 

MARGARET S. LUBS, B.Mus. Converse College; B.A., Univen 
of Georgia; M.A., Columbia University 1 

Professor of English and French 

JOHN C. McCarthy, jr., B.B.A., university of Miami; M.B. 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

KENNETH P. McKINNELL, B.F.A., The University of Geori 
Assistant Professor' of AH 

♦CHARLES A. McMURRAY, JR., B.S., High Point College; M 
University of North Carolina 

Instructor in Chenustry 



(iOTHY M. MANNING, B.S., State University of New York 
;it Buffalo; Master of Librarianship, University of Wash- 
ington 

CaMoger 

ANCIS L. MANNION, JR., B.I.E., University of Florida 
Instructor in Mathematics 

VK MAYER, B.S., M.A., Columbia University 
Instructor in Nursing 

' I.IJAM S. MEDART, A.B., M.D., Washington University 
Professor of Biochemistry 

(U:RT E. L. morgan, B.B.A., M.A., Memphis State Univer- 
sity; Certified Public Accountant 

Assistant Professor of Bu^ness Administration 

^[N F. NEWMAN, B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., 
(leorgetown University; Ph.D., University of Florida 
Associate Professor of Political Science 

ffHN M. PARR, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instiructor in Engineering aTid Mathematics 

[JGLAS F. PARRY, B.A., M.A., University of Utah; Ph.D., 
Syracuse University 

Coordinator, Elementary Education 
Professor of Education 

SERT L. PATTERSON, B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan College; 
M.A., University of Kentucky 

Assistant Professor of History 

\:K H. PADGETT, A.B., Wofford College; M.A., University 
of North Carolina 

Registrar 

JLENN PEARCE, B.B.A., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Business Administration 

KES PEARSON, B.A., M.A., University of Oklahoma; M.A. in 
I Library Science, University of Minnesota 
I Cataloger 

ISH PENDEXTER, III, A.B., Bov^doin College; M.A., North- 
I western University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
j Head, Department of English & Speech 

\ Professor of English 

llES H. PERSSE, B.F.A., University of Georgia; M.M., D.- 
' Mus., Florida State University 

Head, Department of Fine Arts 
Professor of MuMc 



VIRGINIA RAMSEY, A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A 
Emory University 

Assistant Professor of English 

♦JOCELYN S. REITER, B.Mus., Eastman School of Music; 4.' 
Mus., University of Nebraska 

Instncctor in Applied Music {Voice) 

PAUL E. ROBBINS, B.S., University of Pennsylvania; Ph 
Georgia Institute of Technology , 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

JAMES T. ROGERS, B.S., Delta State College; M.R.E., New r- 
leans Baptist Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Florida S1:< 
University 

Dean of Student Affairs 

JULE C. ROSSITER, A.A., Armstrong State College 3 

Comptroller ^ 

BARBARA RUNDBAKEN, B.S., Michigan State University 

Instructor in Nursing 

RAFAEL SANCHEZ-DIAZ, B.S., University of Puerto Rico; M: 
University of Texas; Ph.D., University of California 
Professor of Mathematics 

R. JOANNE SCARBOROUGH, B.S., Winthrop College; M. 
University of Iowa 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

LEA LESLIE SEALE, B.A., University of Southwestern Loui- 
ana; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
Professor of English 

JAMES L. SEMMES, B.S. United States Naval Academy; M 
Florida State University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

*DON L. SILHACEK, B.Sc, M.Sc, University of Nebraska; Ph. 
University of Wisconsin 

Part-time Professor of Chemistry 

ROY J. SIMS, B.S., David Lipscomb College; M.S., Universit; 
of Tennessee 

Head, Departmeyit of Physical Education 
Professor of Physical Education 

WILLIAM W. STOKES, B.A.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D., University! 
Florida ^ 

Head, Department of Education 
Professor of Education 



:^DRIC STRATTON, B.Sc, Nottingham University, England; 
Ph.D., Birkbeck College, London, England 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

f)BERT I. STROZIER. A.B., University of Georgia; M.A., Ph.D., 
Florida Stiite University 

Professor of Eyiglish 

JiROL HELEN SUTTON, B.S. in Nursing, University of South 
Carolina 

Instructor in Nursing 

^TH E. SWINSON, B.S., in Ed., Georgia Southern College; M.A. 

in Library Science, George Peabody College for Teachers 
I Assistant Professor 

^ Reference Librarian 



L.WRENCE M. TAPP, B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee 
Acting Head, Physical Education Department 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

DROTHY M. THOMPSON, A.B., Monmouth College; M.A., 
North-western University; Certificate in Psychiatric Social 
Work, Western Reserve University 

Professor of Psychology 

rANCIS M. THORNE, III, B.S., Stetson University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Georgia 

Associate Professor of Biology 

ILE J. UNDERWOOD, B.A., M.A., The University of Florida 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

r:AN W. VINING, B.S., University of Georgia; M.Ed., Georgia 
Southern College 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

•HN A. WELSH, III, A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Vanderbilt 
University 

Assistant Professor of English 

IRTHA H. WHICKER, A.B., Catawba College; M.A., Wake 
Forest University 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

JARLES C. WHITE, B.S., East Carolina College; M.A., South- 
ern Illinois University 

Assistant Professor of English 

^LLIAM S. WINN, B.D., A.B., Emory University; M.A., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

Professor of Mathematics 



SANDRA WOLFE, M.A., Texas Technological College \ 

Temporary Instricctor of English 

CLARKE S. WORTHINGTON, B.A., University of Arizona; M.i 
Northern Illinois University 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

K. C. WU, B.A., Grinnell College; M.A, Ph.D., Princeton Univ( 
sity 

Professor of History and Political Science 

REGINA YOAST, B.A., Texas Christian University; B.S. in 1 
brary Science, Columbia University 

Librarian 



E 



* Part-Time Instructor 



Armstrong College Commission 

The Commission controls certain endowment and scholarship f uni 
Dr. IRVING VICTOR, Chairman 
Mr. EDWARD BARTLETT 
Mrs. ARCHIE HERMAN 
Mr. JOHN A. PETERS, Jr. 
Mr. JOHN RANITZ, Jr. 
Mr. HARRY SWICORD 

Ex-Officio 

Dr. THORD MARSHALL 

ROBERT F. LOVETT, The Honorable 

J. CURTIS LEWIS, Jr., The Honorable 

Mr. HAL HOERNER 

Mr. SIDNEY RASKIN 



i 



1/ PURPOSES AND PROGRAMS 

A college is primarily a community of teachers and 
students who organize their energies for the work 
of the mind. Success in college means that a student 
has acquired those liberating skills of the mind that 
enable a man or woman to live the most fruitful life 
possible for him or her; that he has discovered the 
usefulness of those skills for understanding the world 
and for living in it competently and conscientiously. 

Armstrong State College attempts to provide a 
climate where the student is induced to make con- 
nections between what he thinks and does and the 
best that has been thought and done. It is a climate 
intending to nourish the judging, critical and free 
man, responsible to himself and to his fellow man be- 
cause he is developing and testing his own ideas and 
values. 

Here the student works under able teachers to 
acquire liberal arts, and with their aid to explore man 
and his world through the insights of the humanities, 
the natural sciences and the social sciences. These 
studies are the core of every four year degree pro- 
gram. 

In addition, the complex professional resources of 
the college make it the center for professional pro- 
grams, such as those in elementary and secondary 
education, nursing, and business, which require a 
sound academic training as well as the development 
of professional skills. The college is the natural center 
for the creation of numerous programs, often through 
short non-credit courses and institutes, which apply 
the college's resources to the many problems arising in 
a large urban community. In this sense, the education- 
al role of the college is truly multi-purpose. 

FOUR-YEAR DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of history, English, 
music, political science, and psychology 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, chem- 
istry, and mathematics. 



Bachelor of Business Administration in the fields 
of accounting, management, and economics. 

(Each of these above degrees may be taken along 
with an approved program leading to certification for 
secondary school teaching.) 

Bachelor ef Science in Elementary Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education. 

TWO YEAR DEGREES 

Associate in Arts. This degree is offered as 
preparation for higher degrees in the liberal arts and 
professions and for positions in business after two 
years of college. The student planning to transfer 
from Armstrong State College into a professional or 
academic major program not offered here should, at 
the beginning of his freshman year, consult the catalog 
requirements of the school he plans to attend. Arm- 
strong State College offers the first year of programs 
in forestry and veterinary medicine; the first two 
years of programs in engineering, industrial manage- 
ment, physical education, physics, pharmacy ; the first 
three years, or the entire pre-professional programs, 
in dentistry, law, medicine, optometry, and other 
fields. 

Associate in Arts in Nursing. This degree pre- 
pares graduates for the state examination for li- 
censure as registered nurses. 

Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene. 

Associate in Arts in Police Administration. 

HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 

Armstrong State College was founded on May 27, 
1935, as Armstrong Junior College, by the Mayor and 
Alderman of the City of Savannah to meet a long felt 
need for a college in the community. The College was 
housed in the Armstrong Building, a gift to the city 
from the family of George F. Armstrong, and over the 
years built or acquired five more buildings in the 
neighborhood of Forsyth Park and Monterey Square. 
The College, as Armstrong College of Savannah, 
became a two-year unit of the University System of 
Georgia on January 1, 1959, under the control of the 
Regents of the University System. 

In 1962, the Mills Bee Lane Foundation purchased 
a new campus site of over 200 acres, selected by the 
Regents. The new campus, with seven new buildings, 
was occupied in December, 1965. 



In 1964, the Regents conferred upon Armstrong 
the status of a four-year college, with the right to of- 
fer the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science, and Bachelor of Business Administration. 
The College now offers fourteen major programs 
leading to these degrees, and, in addition, the two 
year Associate Degree in Nursing, in Dental Hygiene, 
and in Police Science. 

The College community includes about 2100 stu- 
dents and 84 full-time faculty members. 

Armstrong State College retained its accreditation 
as a junior college by the Southern Association of Col- 
leges and Schools when it became a four-year college. 
In the process of following the procedure required by 
the Association for accreditation as a senior institu- 
tion, Armstrong State College expects to be accredited 
as a senior institution in the fall of 1968, with ac- 
creditation retroactive to January 1, 1968. 

LIBRARY 

The Lane Library is a modern two-story building 
completed in the winter of 1965. The building is com- 
pletely air conditioned and fully carpeted. The li- 
brary is equipped with well-designed furniture of the 
highest quality. A reading room and individual carrel 
desks are available on both floors. There is an attrac- 
tively furnished periodical and newspaper room on the 
first floor. Faculty carrels, group study rooms, a 
seminar room and a staff -faculty room are available 
on the second floor. All stacks are open. 

The library's collection is comprised of books, 
periodicals, pamphlets, documents, newspapers, maps, 
microfilm, microcards, and other materials. Cataloged 
volumes in the library total approximately 50,000. 

The periodicals subscription list of 475 titles is 
well balanced and carefully chosen to meet the require- 
ments of students and faculty. 

A microfilm reader-printer, a microcard reader and 
a copying machine are available in the library for 
faculty and students use. 

Services and regulations are specified in the library 
handbook, available on request to the Librarian of the 
college. 

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

Short Courses, Workshops and Seminars. These 
are planned, organized and administered by the office 
in response to group interest, or to meet a community 



need brought to the attention of the Dean. All are 
offered on a non-credit basis and, except in a very 
few cases, there are no special requirements or pre- 
requisites for admission. An additional brochure of 
the non-credit and credit courses, under the heading 
of "Schedule of Evening Classes" is mailed out before 
the beginning of every quarter; anyone wishing to 
do so may have his name placed on this mailing list. 
Subjects covered vary widely; the series is designed 
to offer something to appeal to almost any adult 
taste, from Computer Programming to Interior Deco- 
ration. The Dean is always glad to arrange courses 
for candidates preparing to take professional exami- 
nations in engineering, insurance, real estate and 
many others; the college has been approved as an 
Examination Center for a number of these examina- 
tions. One-day workshops, such as the annual Writers' 
Workshop, are also planned and managed by this 
office. 

EVENING CLASSES 

In addition to the full daytime schedule, Armstrong 
offers a schedule of classes in the evening, including 
most of the required courses for some programs lead- 
ing towards a degree. 

Students employed during the day must limit 
their enrollment to one or two courses each quarter. 



3/ADMISSION 
TO THE COLLEGE 

Application forms for admission to Armstrong 
State College are provided by the Admission Officer 
upon request. Any application cannot be considered 
until all required forms are properly executed and 
returned to the Admissions Office. Applications must 
be one file in the Admissions Office at least twenty 
days before the opening of the quarter in which the 
applicant wishes to enter. Deadlines for submitting 
applications for the 1968-69 session are: 

For Summer Quarter, 1968-69 — May 20 (New 

freshmen and 
transfers) 
June 3 (Transient 
students — Sum- 
mer only) 
For Fall Quarter, 1968 —September 1 

For Winter Quarter, 1969 —December 16 
For Spring Quarter, 1969 — March 1 
For Summer Quarter, 1969 — May 20 (New 

freshmen and 
transfers) 
— June 2 (Transient 
students — S um- 
mer only) 
For Fall Quarter, 1969 —September 1 

The applicant must be at least sixteen years old 
on or before registration date and must give evidence 
of good moral character, promise of growth and de- 
velopment, seriousness of purpose, and a sense of 
social responsibility. Armstrong State College reserves 
the right to examine and appraise the character, the 
personality, and the physical fitness of the applicant. 
The College further reserves the right to examine 
any applicant by the use of psychological, achieve- 
ment, and aptitude tests and to require additional 
biographical data and an interview before the appli- 
cant is accepted or rejected. If an interview is re- 
quired, the applicant will be notified. 



Armstrong State College reserves the right to 
refuse to accept any or all of the credits from any- 
high school or other institution, notwithstanding its 
accredited status, when the College determines through 
investigation or otherwise that the quality of instruc- 
tion at such high school or other institution is for 
any reason deficient or unsatisfactory. The judgment 
of the College on this question shall be final. 

The Admissions Officer may refer any applicant 
to the Admissions Committee of the College for study 
and advice. The ultimate decision as to whether an 
applicant shall be accepted or rejected shall be made 
by the Admissions Officer subject to the applicant's 
right of appeal as provided in the policies of the 
Board of Regents of the University System. 

On the basis of his achievement as reflected by 
his high school grades and on his potential ability 
as shown by his scores on the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test, an evaluation of each applicant's readiness to 
undertake college work will be made. 

The Admisions Officer shall, as promptly as prac- 
ticable, inform the applicant of the action taken upon 
his application. 

The College reserves the right to terminate accep- 
tance of applications when enrollment capacity is 
reached. The College further reserves the right to 
reject an applicant who is not a resident of the State 
of Georgia. 

All students enrolled at Armstrong State College 
are required to sign the Honor Pledge at the time of 
their initial registration. For a detailed explanation 
of the Honor System see the REGULATIONS section 
of this catalogue. 

Specific requirements for admission are discussed 
below. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMAN APPLICANTS 

1. Certificate of graduation from an accredited 
high school (or successful completion of the General 
Educational Development Test [GED] with no score 
less than 45). 

2. A transcript of the applicant's high school 
record to be submitted by the high school directly to 
the College. 

3. A minimum of sixteen units of high school 
credit, including the following specific subjects: 

English — 4 units 

Mathematics — 2 units (One unit must be in 
algebra, although two units of algebra are 



desirable. For students entering the enj?i- 
neerin^ or scientific fields, two units of al- 
gebra and one of geometry are needed.) 
Science — 2 units 
Social Studies — 2 units 
Other units sufficient to graduate. 

4. Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. 
Official results of this test must be filed with the 
Admissions Office by the final date for submitting 
application for the quarter in which the student wishes 
to enroll. 

The Scholastic Aptitude Test is given in all states 
and numerous foreign countries in November, Decem- 
ber, January, March, May, and July. Students wish- 
ing to make application to take the test may secure 
application forms from their secondary school prin- 
cipal or counselor, or by writing directly to the College 
Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, 
New Jersey 08540, or Box 1025, Berkeley, California 
94701, for an application form and the Bulletin of 
hiformation which is available without charge. Appli- 
cants who w^ish to enroll at the beginning of the 
Winter Quarter should take the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test in November. 

5. Application fee of $10 which must accompany 
the application form. This fee does not bind Arm- 
strong State College to admit the applicant nor does 
it indicate acceptance of the applicant's qualifications. 
The fee will not be credited toward the matriculation 
fee in the event that the applicant is accepted as a 
student and it will not be refunded in the event that 
the applicant does not enroll as a student. An appli- 
cant who fails to enroll in the quarter for which he 
is accepted must reapply for admission if he wishes 
to enter the institution at a later time by resubmis- 
sion of fee by the date specified. 

6. Emergency Surgery or Medication Permit 
signed by the parents of a student (or the student 
himself if over 21 years of age) must be returned 
prior to admission either authorizing or not author- 
izing the College to take whatever action is deemed 
necessary in the case of an emergency until the parents 
can be reached. 

7. Physical examinations prior to admission are 
required for all entering students with the exception 
of the following: Evening students, special students, 
transient students, and auditors. 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Armstrong State College gives advanced placement, 
or in some cases college credit, for college level high 
school courses, on the basis of the high school teacher's 
recommendation, the student's grade on the Advanced 
Placement Examination of the CEEB, and approval 
by the appropriate department chairman of Armstrong 
State College. 
SUMMER ON TRIAL 

A freshman applicant who fails to meet the reg- 
ular standards for admission may consult the Admis- 
sions Officer about requirements for trial admission 
during the summer quarter. 
REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER APPLICANTS 

1. Transfer applicants will follow the same pro- 
cedures as freshman applicants, except that transfer 
applicants who will have achieved sophomore standing 
at the time of their entrance will not be required to 
submit their high school records. Such records may 
be required by the Admissions Office but normally 
the transcripts of previous college records will suffice 
in place of the high school record. A transfer appli- 
cant must ask the Registrar of each college he has 
previously attended to mail an official transcript of 
his record to the Admissions Office at Armstrong 
State College, regardless of the transferability of the 
credits. 

2. Transfer applicants with less than sophomore 
standing (less than 45 quarter hours completed) must 
meet entrance requirements of both freshman and 
transfer applicants and will be required to submit 
their high school records as well as transcripts of 
college records. 

3. A transfer applicant will not be eligible for 
admission to Armstrong State College unless he is 
eligible to return to the last college attended on the 
date he expects to enter Armstrong. A student who 
is on suspension from another college because of poor 
scholarship or disciplinary reasons will not be eligible 
for admission. 

4. A transfer applicant will be considered for 
admission to Armstrong State College if, on all work 
attempted at other institutions, his academic perform- 
ance as shown by his grade point average is equivalent 
to the minimum standard required by Armstrong State 
College students of comparable standing. (See chart 
under Academic Probation and Dismissal Policy on 
page 52.) 

5. Credit will be given for transfer work in which 



the student received a grade of "D" or above with 
the percentage of "D" and ''D-f " grades not to exceed 
twenty (20) per cent of the total hours being trans- 
ferred. College credit will not be allowed for such 
courses as remedial English and remedial mathematics 
or courses basically of secondary school level. 

6. Credits earned at an institution which is not 
a member of the appropriate regional accrediting 
agency can be accepted on a provisional basis only. 
A student transferring from an institution which is 
not a member of the regional accrediting agency must 
achieve a "C" average on his first fifteen quarter 
hours of work at Armstrong in order to be eligible 
to continue. His transfer credits would then be evalu- 
ated in certain areas by examination. 

7. The amount of credit that Armstrong will 
allow for work done in another institution within a 
given period of time may not exceed the normal 
amount of credit that could have been earned at Arm- 
strong during that time. A maximum of 100 quarter 
hours may be transferred from a junior college. For 
a bachelor's degree, 90 quarter hours of junior and 
senior level work will be required (except in certain 
approved programs in mathematics, the natural sci- 
ences, and music), of which the last 45 quarter hours 
in courses numbered 200 and above must be taken 
at Armstrong. At least half of the courses offered 
in the major field must be taken at Armstrong. 

8. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted 
toward a degree may be taken by correspondence or 
extension courses. No correspondence courses may 
be used to meet requirements in the major field or 
the related field for the bachelor's degree. No cor- 
respondence courses may be taken while a student 
is enrolled at Armstrong State College. Correspond- 
ence credit will not be accepted for courses in English 
composition or foreign language. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Applicants who possess a bachelor's degree or its 
equivalent and who wish to take courses for personal 
enrichment or advancement may be admitted as special 
students. Such an applicant will submit the applica- 
tion form and fee and will have official transcripts 
of his college records mailed to the Admissions Office 
by the final date for submitting applications for the 
quarter in which he wishes to enroll. 
AUDITORS 

Armstrong State College grants to certain persons 
who are not regularly admitted students special per- 



mission to audit courses. Such applicants will not be 
required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given 
by the CEEB but must meet all other requirements 
for admission and pay regular fees. A special form 
for permission to audit courses may be obtained from 
the Admissions Office. 
READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

A student who has not been enrolled at Armstrong 
for one or more quarters must apply for readmission 
on a form provided by the Admissions Office. A 
former student who has not attended another college 
since leaving Armstrong may be readmitted provided 
he is not on suspension at the time he wishes to re- 
enter. A former student who has attended another 
college since leaving Armstrong must meet require- 
ments for readmission as a transfer student or as 
a transient student, whichever is applicable. A stu- 
dent who is readmitted after an absence from the 
College for more than two years must meet degree 
requirements as listed in the catalogue in effect at 
the time of his return. 
TRANSIENT STUDENTS 

Transient student status means that a student is 
admitted to Armstrong State College only for a speci- 
fied period of time, normally a summer quarter, with 
the understanding that he is to return to his own 
college for the next quarter. An applicant for tran- 
sient status must file a regular application form and 
submit a statement from his Dean or Registrar that 
he is in good standing and has permission to take 
specific courses at Armstrong to be transferred to 
his own institution when satisfactorily completed. 
Since transient students are not admitted as regular 
Armstrong students, transcripts of college work com- 
pleted elsewhere are not usually required of such 
applicants. A transient student who wishes to remain 
at Armstrong longer than one quarter must submit 
an additional statement from his Dean or Registrar 
or he must meet all requirements for regular admis- 
sion as a transfer student. 

ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE/HIGH SCHOOL 
ACCELERATED PROGRAM 

This program marks a new venture for this com- 
munity in which college and high school join to chal- 
lenge intellectually able young men and women to 
test their interests and their capacity to learn. 
The Program 

High school students who have completed the 
eleventh grade, who have met the criteria for admis- 



sion to the projrram and who maintain its standards 
will be permitted to enroll in one course each quaiter 
at Armstrong State College while they complete the 
senior year of high school. Upon graduation from 
high school, these students will be admitted upon 
application as regular students of the College and 
will be given full college credit for the courses taken 
at Armstrong. 

Through this program, a student may complete 
over two-thirds of the freshman year of college be- 
fore he begins his regular college career. 

The maximum number of college courses possible 
is: 

Summer 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Fall 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Winter 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Spring 1 course ( 5 qtr. hours) 

Summer (following 
high school gradu- 
ation and admission 
to Armstrong) 3 courses (15 qtr. hours) 

7 courses (35 qtr. hours) 
The College Courses 

Every student accepted in this program must take 
a course in English or mathematics first. Thereafter 
he may choose any freshman course, with permission 
of his college adviser. 
Criteria of Admission 

The College will consider a student for this pro- 
gram only upon written recommendation of his high 
school principal. In the view of the College, it is only 
the principal who can judge the circumstances that 
may make the program valuable and practicable for 
any student. 

To be admitted to the progi^am a student must 
satisfy all of these criteria: 

1. written recommendation by the Principal of 
the high school; 

2. completion of the eleventh grade in an ac- 
credited high school ; 

3. a combined verbal and math score of 1000 on 
CEEB tests; 

4. an average grade of B or better in academic 
subjects (English, mathematics, science, social 
studies, language) through the ninth, tenth 
and eleventh grades as averaged by the Arm- 
strong State College Admissions Officer. 

5. written permission of the parents. 



26 



Standards 

A student forfeits the privilege of this program 
if in any quarter his grade in the college course is 
below C or his high school average in academic courses 
is below B. 

Procedure for Admission 

A high school principal may recommend students 
following the fifth six-week period of the students' 
eleventh year. The recommendation to the College 
must be made by May 15th if the student intends to 
begin in the summer. The principal may recommend 
following the full eleventh year by August 15th if 
the student intends to begin in the fall. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

A student from a country other than the United 
States who is interested in attending Armstrong must 
meet the following requirements before application 
is made: 

1. He must have met the requirements of 
paragraph 3, under REQUIREMENTS FOR 
FRESHMAN APPLICANTS, in regard to units 
in the subjects required at Armstrong. 

2. He must have an official transcript of his 

academic record mailed to the Admissions 
Office at Armstrong with an official transla- 
tion. 

3. He should take the SAT of the College En- 
trance Examination Board in the testing cen- 
ter nearest his home and ask that the results 
be sent to Armstrong. 

If the applicant meets the academic requirements 
for admission, he will be sent an application form. 
After it has been returned and approved, the appli- 
cant will be sent an 1-20 Form (I-20A and I-lOB), 
which he can then take to the American Consul to 
ask for a student visa. 

No scholarships are available for students who 
are not legal residents of Georgia. All foreign students 
must pay non-resident fees. 

ADMISSION OF VETERANS 

After having been accepted at Armstrong State 
College and upon receipt of Certification of Eligibility 
and Entitlement from the Veterans Administration, 
veterans may attend under Public Law 358 (Veterans 
Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966), PubHc Law 815 
(disabled). Public Law 894 (disabled), Public Law 
634 (war orphans), or Public Law 361 (children of 
permanently disabled veterans). Students under Pub- 



lie Law 358, 361, or 634 should be prepared to pay 
tuition and fees at the time of registration. 
APPLICANTS SPONSORED BY VOCATIONAL 
REHABILITATION 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabili- 
tation or other community agencies must apply at 
least six (6) weeks before the beginning of any quar- 
ter to insure proper processing of application. 
FINANCIAL AID 

(See STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES 
section of this Bulletin for further information.) 
REGISTRATION AND ORIENTATION 

Prior to the Fall Quarter a period of orientation is 
set aside to assist new students in becoming acquainted 
with the College, its curriculum, extra-curricular ac- 
tivities, student leaders, counselors, members of the 
faculty and the administration. Complete instructions 
concerning registration are made available to all stu- 
dents at the beginning of the registration period. 
Registration includes counseling, academic advisement, 
selection of courses, enrollment in classes, and pay- 
ment of fees. Full details regarding orientation and 
registration are provided to all incoming students 
during the summer preceding their initial enrollment. 
RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS OF THE BOARD 
OF REGENTS 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, the 
applicant must establish the following facts to the 
satisfaction of the Registrar. 

1. A student who is under 21 years of age at the 
time he seeks to register or re-register at the 
beginning of any quarter will be accepted as 
a resident student only upon a showing by him 
that his supporting parent or guardian has 
been legally domiciled in Georgia for a period 
of at least twelve months immediately pre- 
ceding the date of registration or re-registra- 
tion. 

2. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia 
is appointed as guardian of a non-resident 
minor, such minor will not be permitted to 
register as a resident student until the expi- 
ration of one year from the date of appoint- 
ment, and then only upon proper showing that 
such appointment was not made to avoid pay- 
ment of the non-resident fee. 

3. If a student is over 21 years of age, he may 
register as a resident student only upon a show- 



28 



ing" that he has been domiciled in Georgia for 
at least twelve months prior to the registra- 
tion date. 

Any period of time during which a person 
is enrolled as a student in any educational in- 
stitution in Georgia may not be counted as a 
part of the twelve months' domicile and resi- 
dence herein required when it appears that the 
student came into the State and remained in 
the State for the primary purpose of attending 
a school or college. 

4. A full-time faculty member of the University 
System, his or her spouse, and minor children 
may register on the payment of resident fees, 
even though the faculty member has not been 
a resident in Georgia for twelve months. 

5. If the parents or legal guardian of a minor 
change residence to another state following a 
period of residence in Georgia, the minor may 
continue to take courses for a period of twelve 
consecutive months on the payment of resident 
fees. After the expiration of the twelve months' 
period the student may continue his registra- 
tion only upon the payment of fees at the non- 
resident rate. 

6. Military personnel and their dependents may 
became eligible to enroll in institutions of the 
University System as resident students pro- 
vided they file with the institution in which 
they wish to enroll the following: 

a. A statement from the appropriate military 
official showing that the applicant's ''home 
of record" is the State of Georgia ; and 

b. Evidence that applicant is eligible to vote 
in Georgia; or 

c. Evidence that applicant, if under 18 years 
of age, is the child of parents who are 
registered to vote in Georgia; and 

d. Evidence that applicant or his supporting 
parent or guardian filed a Georgia State 
income tax return during the preceding 
year. 

7. All aliens shall be classified as non-resident 
students ; provided, however, that an alien who 
is living in this country under a visa permit- 
ing permanent residence or who has filed with 
the proper federal immigration authorities a 
Declaration of Intention to become a citizen of 



the United States shall have the same privilege 
of (lualifyin^'- for resident status for fee pur- 
poses as has a citizen of the United States. 

8. Teachers in the public schools of Georgia and 
their dependents may enroll as students in Uni- 
v^ersity System institutions on payment of resi- 
dent fees, when it appears that such teachers 
have resided in Georgia for nine months, that 
they were engaged in teaching during such 
nine months' period, and that they have been 
employed to teach in Georgia during the en- 
suing school year. 

9. If a woman who is a resident of Georgia and 
who is a student in an institution of the Uni- 
versity System marries a non-resident of the 
State, she may continue to be eligible to attend 
the institution on payment of resident fees, 
provided that her enrollment is continuous. 

10. If a woman who is a non-resident of Georgia 
marries a man who is a resident of Georgia, she 
will not be eligible to register as a resident stu- 
dent in a University System institution until 
she has been domiciled in the State of Georgia 
for a period of twelve months immediately pre- l ^g 
ceding the date of registration. | 



i 



Admission to the Associate 
in Arts Degree in Nursing 

PROGRAM IN NURSING 

Nursing calls for a variety of skills and aptitudes 
and offers unlimited opportunities for different kinds 
of service. Therefore, a candidate for the nursing pro- 
gram should have good physical and mental health as 
well as those personal qualifications appropriate for 
nursing. For these reasons the Admissions Commit- 
tee selects students whose abilities, interests, and per- 
sonal qualities show promise of success in the program 
and in the field of nursing. Factors influencing the 
decision of the Admissions Committee are: achieve- 
ment as shown on the secondary school record, ability 
as measured by the Scholastic Aptitude Test, motiva- 
tion for nursing, health, personal qualities, and social 
adjustment. Applicants who, in the judgment of the 
Admissions Committee, present high overall qualifica- 
tions are selected. Since applications are processed as 
received, applicants are encouraged to apply early in 
the senior year of high school or as early in the year 
preceding admission as possible. Application forms are 
3Q I available from the Admissions Officer of the College. 

' The preferred age for applicants, married or single, 

at the time of entrance is 18. The upper age limit is 
40 years. Applicants who have not reached their 18th 
birthday but who can show evidence that they will 
reach their 20th birthday by the date they are sche- 
duled to complete the program will be considered. The 
State of Georgia requires, as do most other states. 
United States citizenship, either natural born or nat- 
uralized, for registered nurse licensure. Candidates 
for admission to the nursing program who are not 
citizens may be admitted only under certain circum- 
stances and should make individual inquiries. 
How to Apply 

1. Complete the application form for admission to 
Armstrong State College and return it with the 
non-refundable $10 application fee. Mark the 
application For Nursing Only. 

2. Complete the Personal Data Sheet for the De- 
partment of Nursing. 

3. Have the medical form completed by a licensed 
physician. 

4. Have the dental form completed by a dentist. 

5. Take the National League for Nursing Aptitude 
Test on one of the dates scheduled on campus. 



Applications for the National League for Nurs- 
ing Aptitude Test may be obtained from the 
Department of Nursing? at Armstrong State 
College or from the Director of Admissions at 
Armstronjr State College. 

6. Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the 
College Entrance Examination Board as early 
in the year as i)ossible. When ai)plying for the 
test, be certain to list Armstrong State College 
as one college to receive your scores. 

7. Have a transcript of your high school record 
mailed from the high school directly to the 
Admissions Office at Armstrong. (A transfer 
student should also ask the Registrar of each 
school or college she/he has previously attended 
to mail an official transcript of her/his record 
to the Admissions Office at Armstrong, regard- 
less of the transferability of the credits.) 

8. Send or have sent, two written letters of refer- 
ence, directly to the Admissions Office, from 
non-family members (teachers, employers, or 
other qualified persons) who have known you 
for at least three years. 

9. Send or have sent to the Admissions Office a 
certified copy of your birth certificate. 

OTHER INFORMATION 

1. It is recommended that applicants who have 
been away from school for a considerable period 
of time enroll in at least one course in an ac- 
credited college of their choice during the 
school year or summer preceding their planned 
entrance to the nursing program. 

2. Except in unusual circumstances, no credit will 
be given for nursing courses taken in another 
school of nursing. 

3. An applicant on academic suspension or proba- 
tion from another college will not be considered. 

4. Nursing students are responsible for providing 
their own transportation to and from campus 
to the clinical area. (i.e. community hospitals 
and other health agencies). 

5. Armstrong State College does not provide stu- 
dent housing. It is necessary for the students 
whose homes are not located in Savannah to 
make private arrangements for living accom- 
modations. The responsibility for procuring 
suitable Housing rests with the student and 
her/his parents. Effective September, 1968, 



private apartments will be available adjacent 
to the campus. 

6. Students are required to wear the official stu- 
dent uniform of the Department of Nursing. 
Uniforms will be ordered during the Winter 
Quarter and may be purchased from the Col- 
lege Bookstore. 

7. Fees for a nursing student will be the same as 
for any other student at Armstrong. Please 
refer to the fee section of the current Bulletin. 

8. Nursing students are admitted once each year 
in the fall. Seven consecutive quarters of 
full-time study are required for completion of 
the program. 

9. All nursing courses must be taken in sequence. 
Each nursing course has a pre-requisite begin- 
ning with Fundamentals of Nursing. 

10. All students must take the National League for 
Nursing Pre-Nursing Aptitude and Guidance 
Examination. 

11. Students accepted for the nursing program will 
be sent information on supplies and equipment 
needed for the Fall Quarter approximately two 

I weeks before the opening of school with ap- 

32 proximate charges. 

12. Admission into Armstrong State College does 
not in any way guarantee formal admission in- 
to the Department of Nursing. This will be 
accomplished after one quarter in the nursing 
program in which a "C" average (2.0) must 
be attained. 



Admission to the Associate 
in Science Degree in Dental Hygiene 

Second to None in Desii-ability as a Career 

The profession of Dental Hygiene is an ideal career 
for young women interested in science and health serv- 
ices. The growing and constant demand for graduate 
Dental Hygienists assures a young woman of regular 
hours and good compensation. 

A dental hygienist works under the general super- 
vision of a dentist and performs a number of dental 
functions. Her activities usually include performing 
oral prophylaxis (cleaning of the teeth), instructing 
patients in dental health, taking, developing and moun- 
ting dental x-rays, applying fluorides and sometimes 



assisting the dentist in chaiiside and luboratory duties. 

There are certain personal qualifications which are 
essential for a successful dental hygienist. These are 
good health, neat appearance, high moral character, a 
desire to be of service to others, and the ability to get 
along well with people. 

The Armstrong State College program consists of 
seven quarters of full time study. (Two academic 
years and the intervening summer). Applicants are 
matriculated once each year, in September. 

There are no definite age requirements or restric- 
tions for the basic Dental Hygiene program. How- 
ever, all applicants must be graduates of an accredited 
high school or its equivalent. Students may be either 
married or single and must be citizens of the United 
States, either natural born or naturalized. 

Applicants must meet the admission requirements 
for Armstrong State College and the School of Dental 
Hygiene. 

The major part of an applicant's secondary school 
work should be in the college preparatory program and 
should include two years of mathematics. Because of 
the heavy emphasis on science in the dental hygiene 

curriculum, it is important that applicants have a good 

foundation in chemistry and biology. The quality of 33 

the candidate's work in high school English and so- 

cial studies is most important in evaluating her total 
qualifications for admission to the Dental Hygiene 
program. Other factors which influence the decision 
of the Dental Hygiene admissions committee are: a 
"C" or better average in high school, an acceptable 
score (composite — verbal and mathematical) on the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the College Entrance 
Examination Board, and an average of 4 on the Dental 
Hygiene Aptitude Test. 

HOW TO APPLY 

1. Complete the application form for admission 
to Armstrong State College and return it with 
the non-refundable $10 application fee. Mark 
the application For Dental Hygiene Only. 

2. Complete the Personal Data Sheet for the De- 
partment of Dental Hygiene. 

3. Have the medical form completed by a physi- 
cian. 

4. Have the dental form completed by a dentist. 

5. Take the Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test on one 
of the three dates scheduled on campus. Ap- 
plications for the Dental Hygiene Aptitude 



3 



Test may be obtained from the Department of 
Dental Hygiene at Armstrong State College or 
from the Director of Admissions at Armstrong 
State College. 

6. Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test given by the 
College Entrance Examination Board as early 
in the year as possible. When applying for the 
test be certain to list Armstrong State College 
as one college to receive your scores. 

7. Have a transcript of your high school record 
mailed from the high school directly to the 
Admissions Office at Armstrong. (A transfer 
student should also ask the Registrar of each 
school or college she has previously attended 
to mail an official transcript of her record to 
the Admissions Office at Armstrong, regard- 
less of the transferability of the credits). 

OTHER INFORMATION 

1. It is recommended that applicants who have 
been away from school for a considerable period 
of time enroll in at least one course in an ac- 
credited college of their choice during the 
school year or summer preceding their planned 
entrance to the Dental Hygiene program. 

2. For the Associate in Science Degree no credit 
will be given for Dental Hygiene courses taken 
in another School of Dental Hygiene. 

3. An applicant on academic suspension or proba- 
tion from another college will not be considered. 

4. Dental Hygiene students are responsible for 
providing their own transportation to and from 
campus and to community agencies when as- 
signed for field experiences. 

'5. Armstrong State College does not provide stu- 
dent housing. It is necessary for the students 
whose homes are not located in Savannah to 
make private arrangements for living accom- 
modations. The responsibility for procuring 
suitable housing rests with the student and 
her parents. Effective September, 1968, pri- 
vate apartments will be available adjacent to 
the campus. 

6. Students are required to wear the official stu- 
dent uniform of the Department of Dental 
Hygiene. Uniforms will be ordered during the 
Winter Quarter and may be purchased from 
the College Bookstore. 



7. Fees for Dental Hygiene Students will be the 
same as for any other student at Armstrong. 
Please refer to the Fee Section of the current 
Bulletin. 

8. Dental Hypriene students are admitted once 
each year in the Fall. Seven consecutive quar- 
ters of full-time study are required for com- 
pletion of the program. 

9. All Dental Hygiene clinical courses must be 
taken in sequence. Each Dental Hygiene course 
has a prerequisite beginning w^ith Dental Hy- 
giene 101. 

10. All students must take the Dental Hygiene 
Aptitude Test to be considered for admission. 

11. Students accepted for the Dental Hygiene pro- 
gram w^ill be sent information on supplies and 
equipment needed for the Fall Quarter approxi- 
mately two weeks before the opening of school 
with approximate charges. 

12. Admission into Armstrong State College does 
not in any way guarantee formal admission 
into the Department of Dental Hygiene. This 
will be accomplished after one quarter in the 
Dental Hygiene program in which a "C" aver- 
age (2.0) must be attained. 

Admission to the Associate in Arts 

Degree Program in Police 

Administration 

An Applicant must present: 

1. evidence of high school graduation (or equiva- 
lent) as shown by the high school transcript or Gen- 
eral Educational Development credit (USAFI credits 
or credits earned through his school correspondence 
courses are not accepted) ; 

2. transcripts from all previous colleges attended ; 

3. a letter of recommendation from high school 
principal, teacher, or counselor, and a letter from the 
chief law enforcement officer in your community. 

The applicant must be approved by the faculty of 
the Department of Police Administration. 



4 /FEES 



APPLICATION FEE 

The Application Fee of $10.00 is paid by all stu- 
dents at the time of initial application for admission 
to Armstrong State College. The acceptance of the 
Application Fee does not constitute acceptance of stu- 
dent. This fee is not refundable. 

MATRICULATION FEE 

The Matriculation Fee for students registering for 
the normal course load of fifteen hours is $85.00. Stu- 
dents carrying less than 12 credit hours in a quarter 
will pay at the rate of $7.00 per quarter hour in 
Matriculation Fee. 

OUT OF STATE TUITION 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $110.00 
per quarter in addition to all regular fees. Students 
carrying less than 12 credit hours in a quarter who 
are not legal residents of the State of Georgia will pay 
at the rate of $9.00 per quarter hour Out-of-State Fee 
in addition to all regular fees. 

STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE 

There will be a Student Activity Fee of $12.00 per 
quarter for students registering for a course load of 
twelve or more quarter hours. Students carrying less 
than twelve credit hours in a quarter will pay at the 
rate of $1.00 per quarter hour. This fee is not refund- 
able. 

LATE REGISTRATION FEE 

A late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged to 
students registering on the date listed in the catalog 
as the date on which classes begin. A fee of $5.00 will 
be charged for registrations completed on the date 
listed in the catalog as the 'last day to register for 
credit." 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE FEE 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the changing of a stu- 
dent's schedule after the registration cards have been 
processed. No charge is made if the change is initiated 
by the College. This fee is not refundable. 



Gl 



3 



GRADUATION FEE 

A Graduation Fee for four-year programs of $10.00 
will be collected from each candidate to cover all ex- 
penses including- the rental of cap and gown and the 
cost of the diploma. The fee for Certificate for As- 
sociate in Arts- Degree is $3.50. 

TRANSCRIPT FEE 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of 
his college work. The charge for additional copies is 
$1.00 each. 

MUSIC FEES 

Students enrolled in Applied Music Courses will be 
required to pay a special fee in addition to the regular 
registration and matriculation fees. The fees are in- 
dicated in the description of courses found under 
"Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin and 
are not refundable. 

MAKE-UP TEST FEE 

For cause, a student may arrange with an instruc- 
tor to make up an announced quiz or final examina- 
tion. The arrangements to make up the announced 
test must be made within one week after the student 
returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the making up of any 
announced quiz and a fee of $5.00 for a make-up final 
examination and laboratory examinations, except as 
shown below. The total charges to any one student for 
a final make-up examination in a given subject shall 
not exceed $5.00. All fees will be paid to the Business 
Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quiz- 
zes and final examinations will not be charged are 
as follows: The student was absent (1) on official 
college business; (2) due to illness; (3) because of 
death in the family ; or (4) in observing religious holi- 
days. 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from 
paying the fee must be presented in writing to the 
instructor. 

SHORT COURSES 

Fees are announced for each course when the 
course is announced. No refund can be made for with- 
drawal from a course. 



SUMMARY OF FEES 

Matriculation per quarter $ 85.00 

Student Activity, per quarter 12.00 

TOTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS $ 97.00 

Out of State Tuition, per quarter 110.00 

TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS $207.00 

Matriculation, Part-time Students, per quarter 

hour 7.00 

Student Activity Fee, Part-time Students, per 

quarter hour 1.00 

Non-Resident Tuition, Part-time Students, per 

quarter hour (in addition to Matriculation 

Fee) 9.00 

PRIVILEGE FEES 

Application Fee $ 10.00 

Late Registration — Maximum 5.00 

Special Examinations 2.00 

Final Examinations 5.00 

Graduation in four-year programs 10.00 

Associate in Arts Certificate 3.50 

Transcript, first one free, each additional 1.00 

Change of Schedule 2.00 

REFUNDS 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon written 
application for withdrawal from school. No refunds 
will be made to students dropping a course. Students 
who formally withdraw during one week following the 
scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 
80% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who 
formally withdraw during the period between one and 
two weeks after the scheduled registration date are 
entitled to a refund of 60% of the fees paid for that 
quarter. Students who formally withdraw between 
two and three weeks after the scheduled registration 
date are entitled to a refund of 40% of the fees paid 
for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw 
during the period between three and four weeks after 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund 
of 20% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students 
who withdraw after a period of four weeks has elapsed 
from the scheduled registration date will be entitled 
to no refund of any part of the fees paid for that 
quarter. 



39 



Fees and Charges are Subject to Change at the End 
of any Qioarter 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee 
due the college will have grade reports and transcripts 
of records held up, and will not be allowed to re-reg- 
ister at the college for a new quarter until the de- 
linquency has been removed. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full at the 
time of registration. 

If a check is not paid on presentation to the bank 
on which it is drawn, the student's registration will be 
cancelled and the student may re-register only on pay- 
ment of a $5.00 service charge. 



40 




5/ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

HONOR SYSTEM 

The Honor System at Armstrong State College pro- 
vides all members of the student body with an oppor- 
tunity to participate in self government. The accom- 
panying responsibilities are outlined below. 

The Honor System, written by a joint committee 
of faculty and students, received an overwhelming 
endorsement by both faculty and students during the 
Winter Quarter, 1965. 

The ordinances of the Honor System are as follows : 
I. All students must agree to abide by the rules 
and regulations of the Honor System. A stu- 
dent shall not be accepted at Armstrong State 
College unless he signs the following statement 
at the time of his first registration: 
*'I have read the regulations governing the ^1 

Honor System at Armstrong State College, and I — — 

I understand that as a student at Armstrong, I 
must comply with all of these requirements." 
This statement and all rules and regulations 
governing the Honor System shall be printed in 
the official Bulletin and the Student Handbook. 
The statement shall also be printed on the ap- 
plication form for admission to be signed by 
the student before admission to the College. 
It will be the responsibility of the Honor Coun- 
cil to conduct an extensive orientation program 
at the beginning of each quarter for all newly 
entering students to explain fully the require- 
ments of the Honor System and to allow full 
discussion of these regulations. 
n. The following shall be considered violations of 
the Honor Code: 

A. Academic dishonesty of any kind (giving or 
receiving any unauthorized help on any as- 
signment, test or paper. At the beginning 
of each quarter it shall be the responsibility 
of each teacher to make clear what shall be 
considered unauthorized help in his course). 

B. Stealing only when related to cheating. 



C. Lying before the Honor Council. 

D. Failure to report a known offense. (Lying 
or stealing in any other cases will be con- 
sidered disciplinary, not Honor, matters.) 

in. Ways of reporting a violation of the Honor 
Code: 

A. Self-reporting: A student who has broken 
the Honor Code should report himself to a 
member of the Honor Council. 

B. Anyone (faculty member or student) who 
is aware of a violation of the Honor Code 
must report the matter. This may be done 
in one of two ways: 

1. He may tell the person thought to be 
guilty to report himself to a member of 
the Honor Council no later than the end 
of the next school day. After this des- 
ignated time the person who is aware 
of the violation must inform a member 
of the Honor Council so that the Honor 
Council may contact the accused per- 
son if he has not alreadv reported him- 
self. 
42 2. He may report the suspected violation 
' directly to a member of the Honor Coun- 
cil without informing the accused. 

IV. The Honor Council will be composed of nine 
students. 

A. Selection shall be made by the President, 
Vice-President and Secretary of the Student 
Body, the President and Secretary of the 
Honor Council, together with three faculty 
members appointed by the President of the 
College. Selection shall be based on the fol- 
lowing requirements: 

1. High moral principles and unquestioned 
academic integrity in all their relations 
to fellow students, faculty, and adminis- 
trative officials. 

2. A minimum of C-f for the preceding 
quarter and an over-all average of C4-. 

Any student not in good standing with the 
college in academic or disciplinary matters 
is ineligible to serve on the Honor Council. 
Any member of the Honor Council who falls 
below these requirements will be ineligible 
to continue his term of service. A replace- 



ment will not be selected, however, unless 
the total number of students on the Honor 
Council falls below seven. 

B. The selection committee shall sul)mit a (lues- 
tionnaire to those students who meet these 
requirements. On the basis of the (luestion- 
naires the committee has the power to ap- 
point three seniors, three juniors, and three 
sophomores to serve on the Honor Council. 
At least three committee members shall be 
women and at least three shall be men. This 
distribution may be altered when deemed 
best by the selection committee. The ap- 
pointments shall be made by the second 
Tuesday in March, and the Council shall 
assume its duties on April 1. 

C. The Honor Council shall elect one of its 
members to serve as President and one as 
Secretary. The President shall preside at 
all meetings and trials, and the Secretary 
shall maintain a written record of all pro- 
ceedings. 

D. During summer school, any member of the 

Honor Council who is attending summer i 

classes will serve on the Council for the sum- ^^ 

mer together with other students appointed 
by the Council and the Dean of Student Af- 
fairs. 
V. The Honor Council shall formulate its own by- 
laws and procedure. 

A. An Honor Council meeting shall be called by 
the President of the Council to examine a 
reported violation as soon as possible after 
such a report. When possible the meeting 
of the Council will be held within a week of 
of the violation. 

B. At the meeting the Honor Council will hear 
the accusation, the testimony of any wit- 
nesses, and any defense the accused may 
wish to present. 

C. The accused will have the right to hear all 
witnesses and all evidence brought before 
the Honor Council. 

D. Written notification of the specific charges 
which, if approved, shall be made grounds 
for suspension or dismissal from a class. 

E. The accused will be considered innocent un- 
til proved guilty. 



F. Every trial shall be conducted by a Council 
of at least seven members, including the 
President. In the absence of the President, 
the senior justice shall preside. 

G. The Secretary will keep minutes of all meet- 

ings. All official testimony will be tape 
recorded, provided that the recording de- 
vices are under the control of the Council. 

H. A vote of two-thirds majority of the mem- 
bers of the Honor Council present and vot- 
ing will be necessary for the conviction of 
the accused. The Council, in the event of a 
verdict of guilty, shall determine the pen- 
alty by majority vote. 

I. The vote will be taken by secret ballot. 
VI. Post-trial Procedure. 

A. Immediately upon conclusion of the trial, the 
accused shall be notified of the findings and 
of the recommendation that the Council 
will make to the President of the College. 

B. If the accused is found innocent, he shall be 
notified of the finding and cautioned that 
the trial may be re-opened for good cause 

^^ by the Council within a period of three 

I weeks or at the request of the professor in 

whose course the alleged violation occurred. 

C. If a person is found guilty, the Honor Coun- 
cil will recommend to the President of Arm- 
strong State College one of the following: 

1. Expulsion from the class and denial of 
credit in the course in which the viola- 
tion occurred and denial of the position 
of any elective office. 

2. Suspension from school for any number 
of quarters (the minimum suspension 
will be for the remainder of the quarter 
in which the violation occurs.) 

3. Expulsion from school. 

In cases where the accused is found guilty, the 
Honor Council will report in writing its re- 
commendations to the President of the College 
who will make the final decision. After the 
President of the College has decided on the ac- 
tion to be taken, he will inform, in writing, the 
accused, the professor of the class in which the 
violation occurred, and the accusor of his 
decision. The secretary of the Honor Council 
will then post an official notice on the bulletin 



I 



boards announcinj? his action without mention- 
ing: the name of the accused. 
VII. Although the ('olleRe feels that the above three 
recommendations are ai)propriate for academic 
dishonesty, it also recop:nizes that unique cir- 
cumstances may arise. F^or such cases a series 
of appeals is open to the convicted student. He 
may appeal either the conviction or the punish- 
ment or both in the followinjif ways: 

A. To the President of Armstrong State Col- 
lege in a letter. 

B. The President's decision may be appealed to 
the Chancellor of the University System of 
Georgia in a letter. 

C. The Chancellor's decision may be appealed 
to the Board of Regents of the University 
System of Georgia in a letter. 

VIII. Each student will be required to write on every 
written assignment, test, or paper a pledge that 
he has neither given nor received any unauth- 
orized help on this work. This may be done by 
writing the word ''Pledged" followed by the 
student's signature. 
IX. The Honor System is dependent upon student 
cooperation and support. It is felt that every 
student wishes the credit for his work to be 
unquestioned and the college he has chosen 
to be respected. 
X. A revision of the Honor System will require 
a majority vote of the faculty and of the stu- 
dent body. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Every student who enters Armstrong State College 
indicates at the time he applies for admission what 
major program he hopes to follow toward a degree, 
either at Armstrong or at another college. 

If the student has not yet decided upon a choice 
for his major program, he may attend several advis- 
ing sessions during the orientation period. In fact, 
it is not necessary in many major programs for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree to make a clear choice until 
the end of the sophomore year. If a student waits 
one or two years to choose a major program leading 
to a Bachelor of Science degree, he will probably 
find that he must take additional courses to meet 
graduation requirements. For a student attempting 
to choose a major field during his first two years, 
the Office of the Dean of Students Affairs offers 



EE 



counselling helps, and faculty members are happy to 
discuss aspects of their field. 

During Orientation Week and before registration 
all new entering students, both freshmen and trans- 
fer students, will meet with the faculty adviser for 
the major program they have indicated. The adviser 
will guide them at this time in mapping out a schedule 
for the first two years. The student is then respon- 
sible for taking the courses required for his program, 
as outlined in the college Bulletin, in the proper se- 
quence, during his freshman and sophomore years. 
If the student has questions concerning the courses 
required or the proper scheduling of them during 
these first two years, he should see the faculty adviser 
assigned by his major department to confer with 
students during the pre-advisement period scheduled 
in the college calendar. Since the student is respon- 
sible for fulfilling the requirements of his program, 
he does not need the written approval of a faculty 
adviser in order to register for courses each quarter.* 

During the third quarter of his sophomore year, 
a student hoping to pursue a four-year major pro- 
gram should take to the faculty adviser assigned by 

1 his major department a list of the courses he has 

^^ completed with grades. Having satisfactorily com- 

pleted the requirements for the first two years of 
his major program, he will then be admitted formally 
to the third year of the major program and guided 
by the departmental adviser in mapping out his curri- 
culum for the last two years. During the six quarters 
of his junior and senior years the student must have 
his course selection approved in writing by the depart- 
mental adviser each quarter before registration. The 
proper time for this is during the pre-advisement per- 
iod listed in the college calendar. During these last 
two years, the adviser will keep a record of the courses 
the student takes and the grades he makes, and during 
the fall quarter of the senior year, the adviser will 
signify to the Registrar whether the student has com- 
pleted all requirements for graduation in that major 
program up to that time, and is therefore recom- 
mended for graduation. 



*However, a student must be extremely careful to observe all 
regulations for admission to courses, such as the requirement 
of other prerequisite courses, sometimes with a specified grade. 
Credit for a course is invalid unless all its prerequisite re- 
quirements are observed. 



RELATING TO DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

1. Each student is responsible for fulfilling the 
requirements of the degree program which he 
has chosen, in accordance with the regulations 
of the college catalogue. 

2. Exceptions to course requirements for a degree 
are permitted only by the written approval of 
the Dean of the College upon the recommenda- 
tion of the department head. 

3. A student w^ill graduate under any catalogue in 
effect from his time of entrance to the college. 
However, after an absence from Armstrong 
State College of two or more consecutive years, 
a student must meet the requirements of a 
catalogue in effect after his return. 

4. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted 
toward a degree may consist of courses taken 
by correspondence or extension. No corres- 
pondence courses may be used to meet the re- 
quirements in the major field or related fields 
for the Bachelor's degree or for English com- 
position or foreign language. No correspond- 
ence courses may be taken while a student is 
enrolled. 

5. By state law one of the requirements for a dip- 
loma or certificate from schools supported by 
the State of Georgia is a demonstration of pro- 
ficiency in United States history and govern- 
ment and in Georgia history and government. 
A student at Armstrong State College may 
demonstrate such proficiency by passing 

1) Political Science 113 and History 251 
or History 252, 
or 2) A two hour examination in United 
States and Georgia history and govern- 
ment. 

6. For a Bachelor's degree, a student must earn at 
Armstrong State College the last 45 quarter 
hours of credit before graduation in quarter 
hour credits numbered 200 or above. At least 
half of the courses required in the major field 
must be taken at Armstrong State College. 

7. There must be a grade point average of 2.0 or 
better on each of the following : 

a. on all work taken at Armstrong, 
b- on all courses in major field. 

8. Before a degree will be conferred upon a stu- 
dent by Armstrong State College, all fees must 



Q7 



48 



have been paid, and the Registrar must have 
been notified in writing at least by the end of 
the preceding fall quarter of his intention to 
graduate. A candidate for a degree, unless 
excused in writing by the President, Dean of 
the College, or Dean of Student Affairs, must 
attend the graduation exercises at which a 
degree is to be conferred upon him. 

COURSE AND STUDY LOAD 

The normal course load for full-time students is 
15 quarter hours (and a course in physical education 
during the freshman and sophomore years). An aver- 
age student should devote at least thirty hours each 
week, in addition, to course preparation. 

The maximum course load for a student who works 
full-time is 11 quarter hours. A working student 
should plan about ten hours preparation for each 5 
quarter hour course. 

Permission to enroll for more than 17 quarter hours 
will be granted by the Registrar to a student 

a) with an average grade of "B" for the preceding 
quarter, or 

b) in an engineering program, or 

c) requiring an extra course in one of the two 
quarters prior to graduation. 

No student will be allowed to register for more 
than 21 quarter hours in any one quarter. 

Exceptions to these limitations may be made only 
by the Dean of the College. 

Every student enrolled for 15 quarter hours or more 
must take at least one academic course (or a science 
laboratory section) in the afternoon. (If a student 
plans to work part-time, he should arrange his working 
hours after he registers for courses.) 

REPORTS AND GRADES 

It is felt by the faculty that students in college 
should be held accountable for their scholarship. Ac- 
cordingly, grade reports, warnings of deficient 
scholarship and all such notices are not sent to parents 
or guardians by the Registrar except on request. In- 
stead the students themselves receive these reports 
and are expected to contact their advisers whenever 
their work is unsatisfactory. Report cards are issued 
at the end of each quarter. Reports of unsatisfactory 
grades are issued in the middle of each quarter. Each 
student has access to an adviser; in addition, the Reg- 
istrar and all instructors are available to help any 
student seeking assistance. 



Reports are based on the followin^^ s y stem of 
grrading: 

Numerical S\)i\n Honor Points 

A+ 95-100 4.5 

A 90- 94 4 

B4 85- 89 3.5 

B 80-84 3 

C-f- 75- 79 2.5 

C 70- 74 2 

D+ 65- 69 1.5 

D 60- 64 1 

F Below 60 

I Incomplete 

W Withdrew with no grade 

WF Withdrew failing 

NC No credit 

A student who receives an "I" (incomplete grade) 
should consult his instructor at once and arrange to 
complete the requirements of the course. An *T' grade 
which has not been removed by the middle of the suc- 
ceeding quarter automatically becomes an **F". 

HONORS 

Dean List : Students enrolled for at least five quar- 
ter hours of course work who earn an honor point aver- rrr 

age of at least 3.5 will be placed on the Dean's List, | 

which is published quarterly. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an 
honor point average of 3.2 through 3.5 will be grad- 
uated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students graduating 
with an honor point average of 3.6 through 3.9 will be 
graduated magna cum laude. 

Summa Cum Laude: Those students graduating 
with an honor point average of 4.0 through 4.5 will 
be graduated summa cum laude. 

All work attempted at Armstrong and other in- 
stitutions will be considered in computing honors for 
graduation. 

ATTENDANCE 

The control of student attendance at class meetings 
and the effect of a student's attendance on his grades 
in a course is left entirely to the discretion of the in- 
structor. 

A student is responsible for knowing everything 
that is announced, discussed, or lectured upon in class 
a well as for mastering all assigned reading; he is 
also responsible for turning in on time all assignments 
and tests, including recitation and unannounced quiz- 



3 



zes. The best way to meet these responsibilities is to 
attend classes regularly. An instructor may drop a 
student from any class with a grade of ''WF" if he 
thinks that excessive absence prevents that student 
from satisfactorily fulfilling his responsibilities. If 
such excessive absence is the result of prolonged ill- 
ness, death in the family, college business, or religious 
holidays, the withdrawal grade will be either **W" or 
''WF" depending on the student's status at the time he 
was dropped. Each instructor will be responsible for 
informing his classes on their meeting what constitutes 
excessive absence in the particular class. Each student 
is responsible for knowing the attendance regulation 
in his class and for complying with it. 




PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

All Students who are enrolled for ten quarter hours 
or more on the day schedule are required to complete 
six physical education courses, one in each quarter of 
the freshman and sophomore years (111, 112, 113 in 
the freshman year). 

A student graduating with an Associate in Arts 
Degree in less than six quarters must take one course 
in each quarter of his freshman and sophomore years. 

Students enrolled in the Associate in Arts Degree 
program in nursing are required to complete three 
physical education courses. 

A student who has completed at least six months of 



military service is required to take only four courses of 
I)hysical education, which he may choose from all 
scheduled offerings, during his freshman and sopho- 
more years. 

Physical education is not required of anyone beyond 
the age of 25, or of anyone enrolled primarily in even- 
ing classes. 

The department requires all students to make up 
excused absences; unexcused absences lower the final 
grade. 
ACADEMIC PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

A student failing to maintain the gradepoint aver- 
age indicated for quarter hours attempted will be 
placed on academic probation : 
Quarter Hours Attempted at 

Armstrong and Elsewhere Required Cumulative 

GPA* 
0-15 1.3 

16-30 1.4 

31-45 1.5 

46-60 1.6 

61-75 1.7 

76-90 1.8 

91-105 1.9 

106-120 1.9 

121-135 and over 2.0 

A student on academic probation must (1) at the 
completion of the next 15 quarter hours, achieve the 
cumulative grade-point average required for quarter 
hours attempted, or (2) at the completion of the next 
15 quarter hours, achieve at least a '*C" average for 
these 15 quarter hours and for each successive 15 
quarter hours attempted until he achieves the cumula- 
tive gradepoint average required in the table above. 
(A grade of 'T' (incomplete) will be considered an 
**F'' until it is removed.) 

Failing to meet either of these requirements for 
academic probation, a student will be dismissed from 
the college for one quarter. A third such academic 
dismissal will be final. 

A student re-entering the college after academic 
dismissal is placed on probation and must meet the 
requirement listed above. 

The academic status of students who have at- 
tended other institutions will be determined by using 
only work attempted at Armstrong State College in 



[K 



*When a course is repeated, the grade last received replaces all 
previous grades in this course. 



computing the grade point average. The minimum 
grade point average required of such students must 
correspond to the total quarter hours attempted at 
Armstrong and elsewhere as presented in the chart 
above. Any student whose grade point average drops 
below these minimums will be placed on academic 
probation. 

A student dismissed for academic reasons may ap- 
peal by letter to the President, who will refer the ap- 
peal to the Committee on Academic Standing. Such a 
letter of a appeal should state the nature of any ex- 
tenuating circumstances relating to the academic de- 
ficiency; the letter must be received by the President 
no later than 9 a.m. of registration day. 

DROPPING COURSES 

A student desiring to drop a course after the quar- 
ter has begun must obtain a Drop-Add Notice in the 
Student Personnel Office. The notice must be signed 
by the instructor of the course being dropped and 
returned to the Registrar's office. 

A student who drops a course not more than seven 
school days after the class begin will receive the grade 
of 'W. A student w^ho drops a course after the first 

1 seven school days and before the last eight school days 

52 will receive a grade of **W" or *'W/F", depending on 

his status when he dropped. A student may not volun- 
tarily drop a course during the last eight school days 
of a quarter. 

WITHDRAWING FROM COLLEGE 

Any student who finds it necessary to withdraw 
from college must begin the process in the Student 
Personnel Office. A formal withdrawal is required to 
insure that the student is eligible to return to Arm- 
strong State College at a future date. Any refund to 
which a student is entitled will be considered from the 
date which appears on the withdrawal form. 
AUDITING 

A regular student wishing to ''audit" a course with- 
out receiving credit must obtain the written permis- 
sion of the instructor before he registers for the course. 
(Policy for some courses forbids ''auditing") An 
"auditor" cannot change to regular credit status after 
the first week of class. A student may not change 
from credit status to audit status after the first seven 
class meetings. A student who registers for a course 
as an "auditor" receives no credit, "N.C.", on his 
transcript. Regular schedules of fees apply to audi- 
tors. 



6/ STUDENT SERVICES, 

ACTIVITIES 

The Division of Student Affairs, administered by 
the Dean of Student Affairs, is responsible for all stu- 
dent services and activities. In addition to formal 
classroom instruction, the College recognizes the need 
for providing programs and services which contribute 
to a well-rounded college experience. Such programs 
are administered by the Division of Student Affairs 
through the following individuals: Registrar, Admis- 
sions Officer, Counselors, Director of Financial Aid, 
Director of Student Activities, and the Campus Nurse. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Before and during registration, members of the 
faculty are available to students for assistance in the 
selection of course work and in the scheduling of 
classes. Information concerning degree requirements 
and college regulations is provided and topics of gen- 
eral academic interest may be discussed. 

By the end of the sophomore year, students are 
required to designate a major field and are assigned 
to a faculty adviser in that area. The faculty adviser 
then works closely with the student in planning a pro- 
gram leading to the successful completion of degree re- 
quirements. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The faculty and administration of Armstrong 
State College recognize that students are frequently 
confronted with difficult and important decisions. In 
some instances students need the competent assistance 
of professional persons who have been trained to deal 
with the specific problems of college students. 

In light of these needs, qualified testing and 
guidance counselors are located in the Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs to help students in (1) clarifying educa- 
tional and vocational objectives, (2) developing effec- 
tive study skills and habits, and (3) dealing with prob- 
lems of social and emotional significance. 



ORIENTATION 

Orientation for freshmen is scheduled prior to reg- 
istration for the fall quarter. The program is designed 
to assist students in making the transition from high 
school to college and to acquaint them with school 
policies, traditions, and procedures. The Orientation 
Program includes an introduction to administrative 
officials and faculty ; a presentation of the purposes 
and academic progress of Armstrong State College; 
indoctrination concerning the college's regulations and 
requirements; an introduction to student leaders and 
student activities; a survey of the facilities of the 
school; an opportunity for the student to plan a pro- 
gram with counselors; and social events. Attendance 
is required. 

FINANCIAL AIDS 

A college education for qualified students, regard- 
less of their economic circumstances, is the guiding 
principal behind Armstrong State College's program 
of student financial aid. Through an expanding pro- 
gram of financial aid which offers scholarships, short- 
term loans. National Defense Student Loans, and stu- 
dent employment, Armstrong State College tries to 
make it possible for all qualified students with limited 
resources to attend college. 

In selecting a financial-aid recipient, special con- 
sideration is given to the applicant's record of achieve- 
ment and promise of success as well as his financial 
need. Gift scholarships usually specify high academic 
standards as an eligibility requirement ; otherwise full- 
time students in good standing who progress normally 
toward their degree-goal are eligible for financial aid. 

Armstrong State College uses the College Scholar- 
ship Service which evaluates the Parents' Confidential 
Statement. Freshmen may secure this form from the 
local high school counselor, from the office of Student 
Affairs of the College, or from the College Scholarship 
Service, P. 0. Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey. Appli- 
cations which do not include this financial data are in- 
complete and cannot be considered. Applications for 
scholarships must be filed before May 1. Final action 
cannot be taken until the applicants have been ac- 
cepted for admission to the college; thus, early appli- 
cation is urged. 

If a student on scholarship withdraws from school, 
he is obligated to reimburse the college for the scholar- 
ship within one quarter following the date of with- 
drawal. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

Alpha Phi Omega 

Alpha Tail Beta 

Armstronjr State College Alumni Association 

Chatham County Teachers' Association 

Chatham Education Association Scholai'ship 

Civitan Club of Savannah 

Garden City Lions Club 

Edward McGuire Gordon Memorial Scholarship 

Elks Aidmore Auxiliary (Nurses) 

Robert W. Groves Scholarships 

Junior Chamber of Commerce Scholarships 

Kiwanis Academic Award 

Liberty National Bank Scholarship 

Arthur Lucas Memorial Scholarship 

Metropolitan Kiwanis Club of Savannah 

National Secretaries Scholarship 

Pilot Club of Savannah 

Plumrite 

Port City Lions Club 

Azalea Chapter, American Business Women's Club 

Rebel Chapter, American Business Women's Club 

Savannah Business and Professional Women's Club 

Savannah Gas Company 

Savannah Pharmaceutical Association 

Harry G. Strachan, III, Memorial Scholarship 

Strachan Shipping Company 

REGENTS' SCHOLARSHIPS 

Another source of scholarship aid for students who 
are residents of the State of Georgia is the Regents' 
Scholarship. These scholarships, varying from $250 to 
$1,000, are awarded to superior students who are in 
need of financial assistance to attend college. To be 
eligible for a Regents' Scholarship, a student must 
have grades or predicted grades that place him in the 
upper 25% of his class. Recipients of Regents' Scholar- 
ships are expected, upon completion of their program 
of study, to reside in the State of Georgia and work 
one year for each $1,000 of scholarship aid received. 

Further information on these scholarships and ap- 
plication forms may be obtained from the Office of 
Student Affairs at the College. The deadline for ap- 
plying for the Regents' Scholarships is April 30. 

FEDERAL PROGRAMS OF ASSISTANCE 

Educational Opportunity Grants are available to a 
limited number of students with exceptional financial 
need who require these grants in order to attend col- 



lege. To be eligible, the student must also show acad- 
emic or creative promise. 

Grants will range from $200 to $800 a year and can 
be no more than one-half of the total assistance given 
the student. As an academic incentive to students, an 
additional award of $200 may be given to those stu- 
dents who were in the upperhalf of their college class 
during the preceding academic year. 

NATIONAL DEFENSE STUDENT LOANS 

High school graduates who have been accepted for 
enrollment or who are already enrolled at Armstrong 
State College and who need financial help for educa- 
tional expenses, are eligible for student loans. Finan- 
cial need determinations are made on the basis of in- 
formation included in the Parents Confidential State- 
ment. 

The loans bear interest at the rate of 3 per cent per 
year. Repayment of the principal may be extended 
over a ten-year period, except that the institution may 
require a repayment of no less than $15 per month. 

If a borrower becomes a full-time teacher in an 
elementary or secondary School or in an institution of 
higher education, as much as half of the loan may be 

1 forgiven at the rate of 10 per cent for each year of 

56 teaching service. 

GEORGIA HIGHER EDUCATION ASSISTANCE 
CORPORATION 

The Georgia Higher Education Assistance Corpora- 
tion guarantees educational loans made by bona fide 
Georgia residents. Under this plan, the student nego- 
tiates with approved banks, savings and loan associa- 
tions, or insurance companies for a student loan. The 
loan application is reviewed and approved by the col- 
lege. The lending institution, with approval of the 
Georgia Higher Education Assistance Corporation, 
makes the loan directly to the student. 

While the student remains in college, GHEAC will 
pay the lending institution six per cent interest. 
When the student terminates college, he becomes re- 
sponsible to the lending institution for repayment 
of the principle together with interest at six per cent. 

FINANCIAL AID APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

A financial aid applicant should take the following 
steps : 

1. File Armstrong State College Financial Aid Ai> 
plication Form with Director of Financial Aid, Of- 
fice of Student Affairs before May 1 for the fall 
quarter. 



2. A])ply for admission to Armstrong? State College 
through the regular Admissions Office. 

3. Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test Kiveii hy the 
College Entrance Examination Board no later 
than January of the senior year and list Arm- 
strong as one college to receive your scores. 

4. Have parents (or guaidian) complete and submit 
the Parents' Confidential Statement to College 
Scholarship Service, Box 176, Princeton, New Jer- 
sey, requesting that the Need Analysis be sent to 
Armstrong State College. 

When the Director of Financial Aid has received all 
items listed above, then and only then, will considera- 
tion be given to the student's request. 

OTHER SOURCES OF FINANCIAL AID TO 
ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Short-term and long-term loans are available at low 
interest rates through the Kiwanis and Rensing Loan 
Funds. 

Clinton Lodge No. 54, F. & A. M. Scholarship — 
This scholarship is for graduates of the regular high 
schools of the Public School System of Chatham Coun- 
ty. Grants will be awarded to students whose family 
income is $7,500 or less; who stand in the top 30% of 
their class; who have a combined SAT score of 900, 
and who are of good character. Return to: Education 
Committee, Clinton Lodge No. 54, F. & A.M., P.O. 
Box 992, Savannah, Georgia, by June 1. 

Solomons' Lodge No. 1, F. & A. M. Scholarship — 
Two scholarships for $240 each to be awarded to a 
graduate of a tax-supported high school. Apply to: 
Committee on Scholarship Awards, Solomon's Lodge 
No. 1, F. & A.M., P.O. Box 1711, Savannah, Georgia. 

Savannah Chapter, National Secretaries Associa- 
tion — One scholarship covering tuition, fees and ex- 
penses, for. a female student majoring in secretarial 
science. Apply to: high school counselor or typing 
teacher. 

William F. Cooper Education Fund — Provides 
scholarships to female students in all fields except law, 
theology, and medicine (nursing and medical technol- 
ogy are acceptable). Apply to: Trust Department, 
Savannah Bank & Trust Company, between April 1 and 
May 31. 

Kennen Foundation Music Scholarships — For piano 
students. Applicants may apply for an audition prior 
to May 1 at Kennen Foundation Headquarters, 1451 
Dale Drive. 



K 



state Teachers Scholarships — Provide scholarship 
funds for residents of Georgia for the purpose of pur- 
suing a full academic program of studies leading to a 
professional teacher's certificate. In order to qualify 
for a State Teacher Scholarship, a student must have 
an average of B or higher. The amount of the scholar- 
ship award will depend on the need of the student. 

The State Scholarship Commission — Provides 
scholarships for students who cannot otherwise fi- 
nance the cost of a program of study in dentistry, 
nursing, pharmacy, social work, paramedical fields 
and other educational and professional fields of study 
as defined and approved by the Commission. 

Ty Cobb Education Foundation Scholarship — Pro- 
vides scholarship aid for residents of the State of Geor- 
gia who have completed their freshman year in college. 
Apply to: Ty Cobb Educational Foundation Scholar- 
ships, Room 454, 244 Washington Street, S.W., Atlan- 
ta, Georgia 30303. 

Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund — Provides 
loans at reasonable interest rates to students in need 
of such aid to attend college. Apply to: Pickett & 
Hatcher Educational Fund, P.O. Box 1238, Columbus, 
Georgia. 

Savannah Pharmaceutical Association Scholarship 
— One scholarship for $200 for a freshman student 
majoring in pre-pharmacy to attend Armstrong Col- 
lege (or the University of Georgia). Apply to: Mr. 
Thomas C. Crumbley, Chairman, Scholarship Com- 
mittee, Savannah Pharmaceutical Association, c/o 
Crumbley 's Pharmacy, 1502 Waters Avenue, Savannah, 
Georgia. 

Chatham Artillery Scholarships — A number of 
scholarships for $250 each to members of the Chatham 
Artillery attending college full time. Apply to the 
Chatham Artillery. 

State Department of Vocational Rehabilitation — 
Students who have had a physical or emotional handi- 
cap, and have been treated successfully, and are ac- 
ceptable for vocational rehabilitation, may receive fi- 
nancial assistance to attend college through the State 
Department of Vocational Rehabilitation. Apply to: 
35 Abercorn Street, Savannah, Georgia. 

STUDENT ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Financial aid is available to students through the 
Work-Study Program and the College Student Assist- 
antship Program. A number of part-time, on campus 
jobs are made available to students who need financial 



assistance. Both the institutional api)licati()n and the 
Parents' Confidential Statement are reciuired foi- all 
types of financial aid. Inteiested individuals should 
contact the Office of Student Affairs i)]ior to the 
bejrinnin^'- of each quarter. 

The Office of Student Affairs also maintains a file 
of available part-time jobs in the community and is 
glad to assist students, whenever practicable, in loca- 
ting- outside work. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

The Placement Office, located in the Office of Com- 
munity Services, assists AiTnstrong State College 
graduates in securing business and professional posi- 
tions. Any senior desiring assistance in securing em- 
ployment should contact this office. 

CONDUCT 

Every student who enrolls in a course at Arm- 
strong State College commits himself, by the act of 
enrolling, to full compliance with the rules and regula- 
tions of the Honor System. This system was written 
by a joint student-faculty committee, at the request 
of the students, and was adopted by an overwhelming 
vote of the student body and of the faculty in 1965. It 
is a fundamental part of our academic community's 
way of life. The Honor System is given under **Acad- 
emic Regulations" in this Bulletin and in the Student 
Handbook. 

Compliance with the regulations and policies of the 
faculty of Armstrong State College and the Regents 
of the University System and Georgia is assumed. 
Gambling, hazing, and the use, possession or consump- 
tion of alcoholic beverage at college functions, whether 
on or off campus is prohibited. For more information 
regarding policies refer to the Student Handbook. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

In addition to an outstanding academic program, 
Armstrong State College offers a complete schedule of 
extra-curricular student activities designed to contrib- 
ute to the development of the student and assist him 
in becoming an active and productive member of the 
community in which he lives. 

Student organizations at Armstrong State College 
reflect the natural variety of interests found in a 
diversified student body. Individuals who seek a well- 
rounded education will avail themselves of the varied 
opportunities afforded through the college program of 
student activities. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The Student Government Association is the official 
g-overning body of the students at Armstrong State 
College. It assists in formulating a program of student 
services and activities, and it strives to express the 
will of the majority of students and to provide experi- 
ence in democratic living. 

All students are automatically members of the Stu- 
dent Government Association and entitled to a vote in 
matters of concern to students. Qualified students 
may seek positions of leadership in the Student Govern- 
ment Association by running for office during the 
spring quarter. 



60 




STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The two official student publications on campus 
are the Inkwell, the college newspaper, and the 
Geechee, the college annual. Both publications are 
produced entirely by students under the supervision of 
qualified faculty members. Financed in part by the 
Student Activity Fund, these publications provide op- 
portunities in creative writing, reporting, and design. 



HEALTH 

Armstrong State College maintains a campus in- 
firmary where a registered nurse is on duty from 
8:15 a.m. until 5 p.m. Students who become ill or 
who are involved in accidents while on campus should 
not hesitate to avail themselves of this service. 

The college also makes available, on a voluntary 
basis, a student health and accident insurance policy. 
The cost of the policy is $12 for a full year. Informa- 
tion regarding the program may be secured in the 
Office of Student Affairs. 
ALUMNI OFFICE 

The prime purpose of the Alumni Office is to 
keep former students informed about the college, 
and to help them keep in touch with each other. Any 
person, who at any time was matriculated as a regu- 
lar student, is eligible for membership in the Alumni 
Association, and upon payment of his dues will re- 
ceive the quarterly newsletter, **The Geechee Gazette," 
and may vote and hold office in the Association. The 
Alumni Office assists in arranging class reunions, 
board meetings, and other functions. For further 
information contact the Director of Public Informa- 
tion. 
HOUSING 

Private apartments for male, female, and married 
students will be available within walking distance of 
Armstrong State College beginning the fall quarter 
of 1968. For further information regarding housing 
please contact the Office of Student Affairs. 
CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS 

A variety of clubs and organizations representing 
varied interests and activities are available to students 
at Armstrong State College. These include academic 
interest clubs, dance and social organizations, hobby 
groups, religious groups, and others. The organized 
clubs on campus are listed below. 
Cheerleaders Science Club 

Photography Club Canterbury Club 

Alpha Tau Beta Phi Kappa Theta 

Delta Chi Wesley Foundation 

Literary Club Baptist Student Union 

Future Secretaries Glee Club 

Geechee Westminister Fellowship 

Masquers Alpha Phi Omega 

Young Democrats Tau Epsilon Phi 

Newman Club Pep Band 

Circle K Young Republicans 

Student Nurses Asso. of Georgia 




ATHLETICS 

Armstrong State College participates in inter-col- 
legiate athletic competition in basketball, baseball, and 
golf. Additional athletic opportunities are provided 
through the Intramural Program in the areas of basket- 
ball, Softball, swimming, and volleyball. 




CULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Armstrong State College provides a variety of 
cultural opportunities for its students. Lectures by 
eminent scholars in the various academic fields and 
musical concerts by outstanding artists are an integral 
part of the program in general education. Student 
dramatic productions under professional direction 
and the student choral society have created distin- 
guished traditions for these groups. The college pur- 
chases a large block of tickets for students to all 
concerts of the Savannah Symphony Orchestra, 



7/ DEGREE PROGRAMS 

AH baccalaureate degrees awarded by Armstrong State College 

[uire as a core curriculum the following minimum number of 

irter hours in the major areas of study: 

Minimum Quarter 
Areas of Study Hours Required 

. Humanities, including, but not limited to grammar and 
composition and literature 20 

[. Mathematics and the natural sciences, including but not 
limited to, mathematics and a 10-hour sequence of lab- 
oratory courses in the biological or physical sciences 20 

. Social sciences, including, but not limited to, history and 
American government 20 

. Physical Education 6 



Total 66 

BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a 
jor in English, history or music, or Bachelor of Science with 
najor in biology, chemistry or mathematics the following re- 
rements must be completed in accordance with the regulations 
ted in this bulletin. Requirements for each major program 
described in the appropriate departmental listing. 
Requirements for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
Science. 
. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

(Core Curriculum) 
Y Qtr. Hrs. 

I 1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

• 2. One Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 15 

3. Music, Art, or Philosophy 110 5 

"A. History of Civilization 114, 115 10 

\J5. History of the United States 251 or 252 5* 

Political Science 113 5* 

6. One of the following courses: 5 

Economics 201 
Psychology 101 
Sociology 201 
one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted 
examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see 
?e 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



EI 



7. Mathematics: an approved sequence 10 

8. One of the following sequences of two courses 10 

Botany 121, 122 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Zoology 101, 102 



85 

11. Courses in the Major Field (i) 50-70 

(No student' will be allowed to take senior division 
courses in his major field unless he has a mini- 
mum of C in all prerequisite courses in that field. 

III. Courses in Related Fields C^) 15-30 

IV. Physical Educational 111, 112, 113 and three 200 
courses 6 

V. Free Electives (^) 15 (or 

more to complete a minimum of 
185 quarter hours, exclusive of 
physical education) 

II. Teacher Education 

The standard credential for teaching in the public schools 
Georgia is the Teacher's Professional Four-Year Certificate (T-4 
To qualify for this certificate, one must have completed an 
proved program designed for a specific teaching field and 
recommended by the college in which the program was complete 
Armstrong State College offers the following approved teachj 
education programs: (see pages 66-71) 

Elementary Education (Grades 1- 8) 
Secondary Programs (Grades 7-12) 

Business Education 

English 

Mathematics 

Science (Biology) 

Science (Chemistry) 

Social Science (History) 



^For its major program a department may not require more than 60 quart 
hours at all levels in the major field, but it may recommend up to 
quarter hours. 

^For its major program a department will require from 15 to 30 quart 
hours of specified courses or approved elective courses in related fieU 
and language courses reaching the degree of proficiency specified by t 
department. (If a course is counted as fulfilling the General Requiremen' 
it will not also fulfill the requirement for "III Courses in Related Fields.' 
Total requirements for II and lU may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 
^For the B.A. and B.S. degrees a minimum of 185 quarter hours, exclusi 
of physical education, is required for graduation. 



VDEMIC ADVISEMENT 

A student who desires to become an elementary or secondary 
)ol teacher should apply during the first quarter of residence 
;he Department of Education for academic advisement. He 
lid follow without deviation the approved program designed 
his preparation and for meeting the requirements the 

ificate to teach. Upon admission to teacher education, stu- 
ts will be assigned advisors as follows : 

(1) Elementary education majors are assigned an advisor 
in the Department of Education who will assist the 
student in planning the total program of studies. 

(2) Students pursuing secondary teaching programs will be 
assigned an advisor in the Department of Education to 
advise the student concerning the professional sequence 
courses and an advisor in the teaching field major to 
approve the courses of the teaching field. Assignment 
of the teaching field advisor will be made by the head 
of the academic department offering the major. 

MISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 

Ul students pursuing a degree program leading toward certi- 
:ion by the Georgia State Department of Education as a 
her must apply for admission to teacher education at Arm- 

ng State College. This application will normally take place 

ng the third quarter of the sophomore year or, for transfer 65 

ents, in the first quarter of the junior year. Application ' — 

is may be secured from the office of the Head of the Depart- 

t of Education. The following criteria are used in admitting 

icants to teacher education : 

1) Completion of at least 75 quarter hours of college credit 

with a ''C" average and completion of Education 103 

or 303 with a "C" or better. 
[2) Competence in oral and written expression. 
•3) Satisfactory physical and emotional health. 
[4) Indication of desirable attitude, character, and teaching 

potential. 

DENT TEACHING 

>tudent Teaching, the culminating activity of the professional 
ence, is provided in selected off-campus school centers. The 
quarter of student teaching is arranged cooperatively by the 
ge, the participating schools, and the supervising teachers, 
lication for admission to student teaching must be made with 
Department of Education during the winter quarter preced- 
the academic year in which the student teaching is to be 
5. The prerequisites for admission to student teaching are: 
'1) Admission to a teacher education program. 
'2) Completion of other required professional sequence 
courses with a grade of "C" or higher. Elementary major 



66 



must make a grade of "C" or higher on all specializ 
content courses taken prior to student teaching. 

(3) "C" average at Armstrong State College on all coun 
attempted, and a "C" average on all courses acceptal 
toward the teaching field or concentration. 

(4) Satisfactory completion of related professional laboi 
tory activities including the "September Experience' 

(5) Satisfactory participation in orientation to stude 
teaching. 

For elementary education majors orientation to student teac 
ing is included in the elementary block (Ed. 435 and 436) whi 
is scheduled the quarter prior to student teaching. For seconda 
majors, the orientation to student teaching is scheduled to m( 
an hour each week during the quarter prior to student teachir 

A student is admitted to student teaching at the time assi^ 
ment is made, which is three months prior to reporting to t 
assigned school. While student preferences and other personal c 
cumstances are considered, the Department of Education reser\ 
the right to exercise its discretion in placing student teachers. 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

I. General Requirements: 91 Quarter Hours 

1. Humanities: 30 quarter hours 

Art 200, Music 200 or Philosophy 110 5 

English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

Speech 228 5 

2. Social Sciences : 35 quarter hours 
Geography 111 5 
History 114, 115, 251*, 252* 20 

Political Science 113* 5 

Psychology 101 5 

3. Sciences: 25 quarter hours 

Botany 121, 122 or Zoology 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 121, 122 or Physics 211, 212 10 

Mathematics 105 5 

4. Physical Education: 6 quarter hours 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

Three 200 courses 3 

II. Electives: 25 quarter hours 

1. Approved electives to establish added proficiency in o 
area to be known as concentration chosen to correspond 
the elementary curriculum : art, English, mathematics, mc 
ern foreign languages, sciences, or social sciences 20 

2. Approved elective in related field 5 

*If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempi 
by examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (i 
page 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



[. Specialized Content Courses: 30 quarter hours 

Art 320 5 

Education 425 5 

English 331 5 

Mathematics 452 5 

Music 320 5 

Physical Education 320 5 

. Professional Sequence Courses: 40 quarter hours 

Psychology 301 5 

Education 103 or 303; 301, 435, 

436, 446, 447, 448 35 

Total 191 

:OGRAM FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 
OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. Music 200, Art 200, or Philosophy 110 5 

3. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

4. Principles of Economics (Ec. 201, 202) 10 

5. American Government (Pol. Sc. 113)* 5 

6. Freshman Mathematics including 5 hrs. of 

Statistics 15 

7. One of the following requirements of tv^o 

courses: 10 

Botany 121, 122 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Zoology 101, 102 

8. Psychology 101 plus four of the following 

courses 25 
Economics 326 
History 251* or 252* 
Psychology 305 
Sociology 201 
Speech 228 
. Courses in Business Education 30-31 

101 Beginning Typing 2 

102 Beginning Typing Continued 2 

103 Intermediate Typing 2 

201 Advanced Typing 2 

one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted 
examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see 
?e 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



EI 



111 Shorthand, Beginning 3 

112 Shorthand, Beginning 3 

113 Shorthand, Intermediate 3 

211 Shorthand or Advanced 

Commerce 202-203 3, 

213 Office Practices 5 

315 Business Communications 5 

III. Courses in Business Administration 

B.A. 211, 212 10 

Select three of the following courses 15 

1. B. A. 307, Business Law I 

2. B. A. 340, Principles of Marketing 

3. B. A. 375, Personnel Administration 

4. B. A. 462, Human Relations in Industry 

5. Ec. 327, Money and Banking 

6. Ec. 331, Labor and Industrial Relations 

7. Ec. 335, Public Finance 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 and three 200 courses 

V. Professional Sequence 
Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to 

Teaching 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational 

Psychology 5 

Education 438 - Secondary School 
53 Curriculum and Methods, 

— -^ Business Education 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student 

Teaching 15 



191-2 

PROGRAM FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHEr 

OF ENGLISH 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. One Foreign Language 20 

3. Art 200 or Music 200 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 251* or 252* 5 

6. Psychology 101 and one of the following 

courses: .10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113* 
Sociology 201 



*If one of these history courses and this political science course are exempt 
by examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (s 
page 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



7. Freshman Mathematics 10 

8. One of the followinK^ requirements of two courses: 10 

Botany 121, 122 

Chemistry 121, 122 

Chemistry 128, 129 

Physics 211, 212 

Physics 217, 218 

Zoology 101, 102 
. Courses in Major Field 

Students must complete the requirements for a major in 
English including English 325 and 410. 
. Related Fields (Select five courses) 25 

Education 425 

Fine Arts 

(200 and above) 

Foreign Language 
(200 and above) 

History 252 or 251 

History 341 

History 348 

History 350 

History 354 

Philosophy 110 

Speech 228 

Speech 341 I 69 j i 

Speech 345 ' ;1 

. Physical Education 111, 112, 113, three 200 courses 6 

. Professional Sequence .. 30 

Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to Teaching ... 5 
Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education 439 - Secondary School Curriculum 

and Methods, English 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 

Total 191 

OGRAM FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 

OF MATHEMATICS 

. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. Art 200, Music 200 or Philosophy 110 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 251* or 252* 5 



bne of these history courses and this political science course are exempted 
^examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see 
\e 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



6. Psychology 101 and one of the following 

courses: .. 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113* 
Sociology 201 

7. Freshman Mathematics 10 

8. One of the following requirements of two 

courses: 10 

Botany 121, 122 

Chemistry 121, 122 

Chemistry 128, 129 

Physics 211, 212 

Physics 217, 218 

Zoology 101, 102 
II. Courses in Major Field . 

Students must complete the requirements for a major 
in Mathematics which includes: 

Mathematics 104, 201, 202, 203, & 311-12; 321- 

322; and one of the sequence 301-302; 401-402 

III. Related Fields 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 and three 200 courses 
V. Professional Sequence 

Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

Psychology' 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

70 I Education 437 - Secondary School Curriculum 

' and Methods, General -. 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 

Total 

PROGRAM FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS OF 

SCIENCE WITH MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Qtr. Hi 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 | 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. Art 200, Music 200 or Philosophy 110 . . 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 251* or 252* 5 

6. Psychology 101 and one of the following 

courses: 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113* 
Sociology 201 

7. Fi'eshman Mathematics 10 



*If one of these history courses and this political science course are exeni 
by examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation ( 
page 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. i 



8. The following courses: 15 

Zoology 101, 102 
Botany 121 
[. Courses in Biology (Junior-Senior level) 40 

Students must c'()nii)lete the requii'ements for a major 
in Biology including Biology 370, 380; Botany 380 or 
Zoology 390 
[. Courses in other Sciences 35 

Chemistry 128, 129, 341, 342, 343 
Physics 211, 212 
■. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 and three 200 courses 6 
. Professional Sequences 30 

Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education 437 - Secondary School Curriculum 

and Methods, General 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 

Total 201 

:OGRAM FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 
OF SCIENCE WITH MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Qtr. Hrs. , 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 [ "71 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. Art 200, Music 200 or Philosophy 110 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 251* or 252* 5 

6. Psychology 101 and one of the following 

courses .. 10 

Economics 201 
Political Science 113* 
Sociology 201 

7. Freshman Mathematics and Math. 104 15 

8. Chemistry 128-129 50 

. Courses in Chemistry . . 50 

Chemistry 281, 282 10 

Chemistry 341, 342, 343 15 

Chemistry 491, 492, 493 12 

Chemistry 480 5 

Electives in Chemistry 8 

. Courses in Other Sciences 25 

Physics 15 

Zoology 101, 102 10 



one of these history courses and this political science course are exempted 
examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see 
je 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



PROGRAM FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHE 
OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

I. General Requirements in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Qtr. Hrs 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. One Foreign Language 15 

3. Music 200, Art 200, or Philosophy 110 5 

4. History of Western Civilization 114, 115 10 

5. History of the United States 251* or 252* 5 

6. Political Science 113*, Sociology 201 10 

7. Freshman Mathematics 10 

8. One of the following sequences of two courses : 10 

Botany 121, 122 

Chemistry 128, 129 

Chemistry 121, 122 

Physics 211, 212 

Physics 217, 218 

Zoology 101, 102 

H. Courses in History 

Students must complete the requirements for a major 
in History including History 251 or 252. 
HI. Courses in other Social Sciences 

1. Political Science (from 300, 301, 302, and 319) 10 

2. Economics 201, 202 10 

3. Geography 111 or Anthropology 201 5 

4. Psychology 101 5 

IV. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 and three 200 courses . 

V. Professional Sequence 

Education 103 or 303 - Orientation to Teaching . . 5 

Psychology 301 - Educational Psychology 5 

Education 440 - Secondary School Curriculum 

and Methods, Social Science 5 

Education 446, 447, 448 - Student Teaching 15 

Total 

III. BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Business A 
ministration with a major in accounting, economics or manaj 
ment-marketing, the following requirements must be completed 
accordance with the regulations stated in this bulletin. For maj 
concentrations, see requirements described under Department 
Business Administration. 

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Business Admi 



"If one of these history courses and this political science course are exemp 
by examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation ( 
page 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



•ation, the minimum requirements in the various fields of study 

I be: 

. Humanities 

A. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

B. Music, Art, or Philosophy 110 5 
. Social Sciences 

A. History of Civilization 114, 115 10 

B. Principles of Economics 201, 202 10 

C. Elective from History, Political Science 113, 

Psychology 101, Sociology 201 5 

25 

. Mathematics and Natural Science 

A. Mathematics (must include Mathematics 111 - 

Statistics) 20 

B. Laboratory Science (sequence) 10 

30 

Business Administration 

Introductory Accounting 211, 212 10 

TOTAL FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE 

(Other than Physical Education) 90 

Approved electives from the Humanities, the Social 30 

Sciences, Natural Sciences or Mathematics. History I 73 

251 or 252 must be included and Speech 228 is recom- ' 

mended. At least 15 quarter hours must be in courses '' 

numbered 200 or above, and at least 10 quarter hours ,4 

must be in courses numbered 300 or above. ;() 

Business Core Requirements 35 |:^ 

(Economics majors - see note below) ;i^ 

B. A. 200, Survey of Business 
B. A. 307, Business Law I 
B. A. 320, Business Finance 
Economics 327, Money and Banking 

and three selected from the following: 
B. A. 340, Principles of Marketing 
B. A. 360, Principles of Management 
Economics 331, Labor and Industrial Relations 
Economics 335, Public Finance 
Economics, 405, Government and Business 
Note: Economics majors may select any approved 
combination from the business core and the major con- 
centration courses. 

VII. Major Concentration 30 

(see Departmental requirements) 
Vm. Physical Education 6 

Total Requirements 191 



74 



BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
(MAJOR IN BUSINESS EDUCATION) 

See listing of requirements under TEACHER EDUCATIO^ 



ONE AND TWO YEAR PROGRAMS IN COMMERCE 
COMMERCE - SECRETARIAL 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those studei 
who wish to qualify for secretarial positions in business after t 
years of study. Students enroll in the Associate in Arts progr 
(listed elsewhere in this bulletin), devoting the permitted 30 hoi 
of elective credits to business and commerce subjects as necessa 
The Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon completion of 1 
program. 

COMMERCE - STENOGRAPHIC 

A student who has only one year to spend in college may acqu 
some of the fundamental clerical skills needed for employment 
a stenographer or clerk-typist. Whether or not a student will 
placed in beginning theory classes of shorthand or typing will 
pend upon previous training in those subjects; a more advam 
standing may be approved by the instructor. A certificate 
awarded upon completion of the following program. 

Commerce 101, 102, 103 6 

Commerce 111, 112, 113 9 

Commerce 213 5 

Business Administration 211 5 

Business Administration 315 5 

English 101, 102 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

♦Elective 5 

Total Hours 48 

♦Recommended electives include Mathematics 105, Speech 228. 



IV. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL 
TECHNOLOGY 

1. English 101-102, 201-202 20 

2. History of the U. S 5 

3. History 114-115 10 

4. Mathematics 101-103 10 

5. Foreign Languages 

(15 qtr. hrs. or 10 qtr. hrs. plus elective 10-15 

6. Psychology 101, Sociology 201 10 

7. Physics 211, 212 10 

8. Chemistry 128-129, 281-282, 341-342 30 

9. Zoology 101-102, 225, 356 20 

10. Biology 351-352 10 



One course from the following: 

Entomology 301 5 

Zoology 357 

Zoology 372 

Zoology 390 
Physical Education 6 

Elective 5 

151-156 
After satisfactorily completing the required number of courses 
I hours listed above, the degree candidate must complete 12 
nths in Clinical Medical Technology at an approved hospital, 
th the completion of this work and satisfactorily passing the 
mination given by the Registry of Medical Technologists, the 
dent will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Armstrong State College cooperates with Memorial Hospital 
Chatham County in giving a B. S. degree with a major in 
iical Technology. This program has been approved by the 
incil on Medical Education of the American Medical Associa- 
i and by the Board of Schools of Medical Technology of the 
erican Society of Clinical Pathologists. 

The Coordinator of this degree program is Dr. L. B. Daven- 
t, Jr., Head of the Department of Biology. 

V. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS IN NURSING V^ 

For the two-year (seven quarters) program of Associate in 

s in Nursing, the student must complete the curriculum of 

quarter hours in academic courses and 54 quarter hours of 

Sessional clinical courses as listed under the Department of 

•sing. 

This program provides the student with the opportunity to 

iin a general education and to study nursing at the college 

:1. Graduates are eligible to take the State Examination for 

isure to practice as registered nurses. 

The curriculum is approved by the Georgia State Board of 

•sing Examiners and has received reasonable assurance of 

•editation from the National League for Nursing. 

VI. DENTAL HYGIENE 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN DENTAL HYGIENE 

For the two-year (seven quarters) program for the Associate 
Science Degree in Dental Hygiene the student must complete 
urriculum of 55 quarter hours in academic courses and 53 
rter hours in professional dental hygiene courses. The pur- 
i of this course of study is to meet the increasing need for 
ng women educated in this rapidly growing and important 
Ith profession. Dental hygienists are in demand to provide 
tal health services in private dental offices, civil service posi- 



tions, industry, and various public health fields. They practe 
under the supervision of a dentist and must pass a state bojd 
examination for licensure. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION 

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Dental Hygiene Educatn 
can be earned by an additional tv^o years (six quarters) of stur. 
This curriculum of 90 quarter hours is designed to prepare deril 
hygienists for careers in teaching in schools of dental hygien 

VII. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS IN POLICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

Armstrong State College provides professional education o 
prepare students for careers in many areas in the administrati 
of criminal justice. The program is offered in cooperation av- 
selected public and private agencies to promote service and 
search. Since the police are charged with the responsibilit 
crime prevention, protection of life and property and assur 
the functions of a democratic free society it is imperative ti 
students going into law enforcement be prepared to meet th 
obligations. 

A strong liberal arts emphasis has been developed in 
program enabling the student to meet new and demanding 
quirements of policing needs. A list of courses comprising 
curriculum has been included elsewhere in this bulletin giv 
the student information on the suggested sequence. 

Specific courses in police administration are open to all s 
dents as electives. Students who plan to follow careers in so< 
work, law, journalism, or special education may find police adir 
istration interesting and useful. Non-majors should consult w 
their faculty advisor before election of these courses. 

For those students seeking a baccalaureate degree, provisi 
have been made at Armstrong State College for transfer of 
police administration credits into the political science curricul 
without loss of credit. Students who plan to graduate witl: 
degree in political science should be in contact with the He 
of that department soon after entering college. 

VIII. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

For the two-year degree of Associate in Arts a student mi 
complete the last 45 quarter hours of course work in this progn 
at Armstrong State College. The program is designed to provi 
a substantial liberal education as a base for upper-division speci 
ization. 

Qtr. Hrs. 

1. English 101, 102, 201, 202 20 

2. History 114, 115 10 

3. One of the following sequences of two courses : 10 

Botany 121, 122 



Chemistry 111, 112 

Chemistry 121, 122 

Physics 211, 212 

Physics 217, 218 

Zoology 101, 102 
4. Mathematics 101 or 105 5 

5 Two of the following courses: 10 

Economics 201 

Political Science 113** 

Psychology 101 

Sociology 201 

U.S. History 251** or 252** 

6. One of the following courses: 5 

Music 

Art 

Philosophy 110 

7. Physical Education 111, 112, 113 

and three 200 courses 6 

8. Electives* 30 

96 

3MPLETE LIST OF MAJOR PROGRAMS OF FOUR 
YEAR AND TWO YEAR DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts with a major in English. 
I Bachelor of Arts with a major in English and requirements 

for secondary certification. 
Bachelor of Arts with a major in History. 
I Bachelor of Arts with a major in History and requirements 

for a secondary certification. 
Bachelor of Arts with major in Political Science. 
Bachelor of Arts with major in Psychology. 
Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music. 
Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music and requirements 

for secondary certification. 
Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology. 

Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology and requirements 
for secondary certification. 

Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry. 

Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and require- 
ments for secondary certification. 

la student plans to continue work in the future toward a Bachelor's 
iTee, he should select courses that will meet the listed requirements of 
bachelor degree program. 

Ime of these history courses and this political science course are exempted 
); examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see 
»e 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



77 I 



13 



13. 
14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

19. 

20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 



Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics. 
Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics and requ:?. 

ments for secondary certification. 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. 
Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in 

counting. 
Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in E>- 

nomics. 
Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in M i- 

agement — Marketing 
Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Bi . 

ness Education. 
Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 
Associate in Arts. 
Associate in Arts in Nursing. 
Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene. 
Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education. 
Associate in Arts in Police Administration. 



I 




8/ DEPARTMENTAL COURSE 
)FFERINGS and REQUIREMENTS 

FOR MAJORS 





Pa^'e 


thropology 


120 


t 


104 


logy 


86 


.any 


87 


siness Administration 


89-92 


jmistry 


95-97 


tnese 


106-107 


nmerce 


92-93 


ital Hygiene 


83-85 


nomics 


93-95 


ication 


99-100 


nneering Graphics 


114-116 


rlish 


101-103 


omology 


87 


nch 


107 


graphy 


111 


man 


107 


:ory 


108-110 


hematics 


114-116 


lie 


105-106 


sing 


81-82 


osophy 


111 


sical Education 


116-117 


sical Science 


97 


sics 


98 


ce Administration 


119 


tical Science 


112-113 


:hology 


120-121 


ology 


122 


nish 


107 


3Ch . 


103 


logy 


87-88 



Hi 



80 



Armstrong State College reserves the right to (1) withdi 
any course for which less than ten students register, (2) 11 
the enrollment in any course or class section, (3) fix the t 
of meeting of all classes and sections, and (4) offer such ae 
tional courses as demand and faculty warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in langua 
where the same or similar courses have been presented for adn 
sion from high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one descript' 
no credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is cc 
pleted, for example: Zoology 101-102. 

After each course name, there are three numbers in par 
thesis. The first number listed is the number of hours of lectu 
the second, the number of hours of laboratory; and the thi 
the number of quarter hours of credit the courses carries. ) 
example: Botany 121 — General Botany (3-4-5). 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are generally planned for 
freshman level; courses numbered 200 to 299 for the sophom- 
level; courses numbered 300 to 399 for the junior level; cour 
numbered 400-499 for the senior level. 

DEPARTMENT OF ALLIED HEALTH SERVICES 

NURSING 

Assoc. Professor Doris Bates, R.N., Director; Rose Marie Bla 
R.N., Asst. Director. 

Instructors: Ann Mayer, R.N., Christine Hamilton, R. N., Nai 
Duffy, R. N., Barbara Rundbaken, R. N., Carol Sutton, R. 
The Associate in Arts Degree Program in Nursing pro\d( 
the student with the opportunity to obtain a general educat 
and to study nursing at the college level. Graduates are eligi 
to take the State Examination for licensure to practice as reg 
tered nurses. 

The nursing educational program is developed by processi 
from simple to complex situations in nursing which evolve fr 
basic concepts fundamental to the total needs of the individu 

Student nurses participate in nursing laboratory experien* 
at Memorial Medical Center, Candler General Hospital Compl 
and other community agencies. Students are assigned to 1 
clinical area and are responsible for providing their own tra] 
portation. Continuation in the program second quarter is depei 
ent upon maintaining a 2.0 average first quarter. 

Students who enroll in this program have opportunities i 
personal, intellectual, and socio-ethical development, as well 
having the personal satisfaction of becoming a member of 
professional group which has unlimited opportunities after gn 
uation. 



FRESHMAN COURSE SOPHOMORE COURSE 

Qtr. Hrs. Qtr. Hrs. 

glish 101 5 Political Science 113* 5 

^emistry 105 5 Nursing 201 8 

Irsing 101 6 History 251* or 252* 5 

irchology 101 5 Nursing 202 8 

Jatomy & Physiology 10 5 P.E. 208 1 

Jrsing 102 6 Humanities Elective 5 

I'chology 305 5 Nursing 203 10 

rsing 103 8 P.E. 113 1 

itrition 105 5 P.E. 204 1 

iirobiology 201 5 Sociology 201 5 
rsing 104 8 

k Course Offerings — Freshman 

JRSING 101— Fundamentals of Nursing I. 
IRSING lOlL — Selected Laboratory Experiences. 

underlying philosophy of this introductory course is that the 
ical approach to the care of the sick is through a developmental 
h based on a patient's typical day. Sound principles of profes- 
lal ethics and the historical development of the nursing profes- 

are correlated. Students are given opportunity to develop 
inning nursing skills, to understand and apply basic principles, 

to identify nursing care needs of individual patients. Clinical 
erience in community hospitals is given under supervision. 
RSING 102 — and Selected Laboratory Experiences — 

Fundamentals of Nursing II (4-6-6) 

requisite: Nursing 101 

s course is a continuation of Fundamentals of Nursing. The 
ients develop more complicated nursing skills and an av^are- 

of the inter-relatedness of medical-surgical nursing problems, 

the sociological, physiological, and psychological needs of the 
ents. The problem - solving technique is introduced. Selected 
sing Practice is provided in applying the principles of com- 
lensive nursing care to patients in the hospital. 
RSING 103 and 104 — and Selected Laboratory Experiences — 

Nursing in Maternal and Child Health 
Nursing I and II (5-9-8), (5-9-8) 

requisite: Nursing 102 

;he Maternal and Child Health Nursing sequence the frame- 
of knowledge, needed for the study of the nursing needs 
he individual and family which will be developed throughout 
curriculum, is established. The course is designed to assist 
student in the application of appropriate nursing principles, 
nning with conception, the prenatal period, labor and delivery, 
care and development of the newborn, the infant and child, 

ne of these history courses and this political science course are exempted 
ixamination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation (see 
2 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



3 



and the effect of illness during the growing years from birt 

adolescence. 

Laboratory experience is planned selectively and utilizes age? 

and facilities concerned with mothers, babies, children and t 

families. 

Course Offerings — Sophomore 
NURSING 201 and 202— and Selected Laboratory Experienc 

Nursing in Physical and Mental 
Illness I and II (5-9-8), (5 

Prerequisite: Nursing 103 and 104 
The physical and mental illness sequence is an integrated st 
of the typical emotional and physical problems interrupting 
human life cycle from adolescence, through middle age, to se 
cence and death. 

Laboratory experiences in community agencies and hospital] 
cilities are provided each student to reinforce theoretical learn 
NURSING 203 — and Selected Laboratory Experiences — 

Advanced Nursing Problems (5-15 

Prerequisite: Nursing 202 
This course is a continuation of Nursing 201 and 202. Conri 
is correlated to strengthen knowledge and skills needed by 
present day beginning nurse in giving physical care and psyi 
logical support to patients. Also current trends in nursing 
explored, as well as responsibilities both legal and professio 
Laboratory experiences are designed to enhance breadth and d€ 
of knowledge in selected clinical areas. 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE 
Associate Professor Roy M. Blackburn, D.D.S. 
GENERAL EDUCATION DENTAL HYGIENE 

Or. EDUCATION 

Anatomy and Physiology 10 5 < 



:c 







Nutrition 105 5 Dental Hygiene 101 and 102 I 

Psychology 101 5 Dental Hygiene 103 2 

English 101 5 Dental Hygiene 104 and 105 .- 

Sociology 201 5 Dental Hygiene 106 2 

Chemistry 105 5 Dental Hygiene 201 3 

*Political Science 113 5 Dental Hygiene 202 and 203 ( 

Microbiology 210 5 Dental Hygiene 204 6 

Health 107 5 Dental Hygiene 205 2 

Speech 228 5 Dental Hygiene 206 3 

* History 251 or 252 5 Dental Hygiene 207 2 

— Dental Hygiene 208 3 

55 Dental Hygiene 209 3 



40 + 13 = 



*If one of these history courses and this political science course are exem 
by examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation 
page 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



ifCHELOR OF SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION 

(In addition to courses listed for Associate in Science in Dental 
^giene Decree the following courses must be completed.) 

5 
5 
5 
5 

20 



Itlish 102 




5 


Dental Hygiene 401 


[th 105 




5 


Dental Hygiene 402 


[th 106, 107, 108, 


or 109 


5 


Dental Hygiene 403 


:tory 114 




5 


Dental Hygiene 404 


Itory 115 




5 




llosophy 110 
totion 301 




5 






5 




ication 303 




5 




chology 301 




5 




chology 305 




5 




ication 437 




5 




I 




55 




1 stives 




15 





70 

Course Offerings 
^TAL HYGIENE 101 and 102— Dental Anatomy and 

Oral Histology I and II (4-2-5), (1-4-3) 

evelopmental study of the embryonic growth of the oral cavity, 
primary tissues and histology of the teeth, the calcification, 
)tion, anatomy, and function of the human dentition and sup- 
ing structures. 

Dental Hygiene students only. 

Dratory — Identification, sketching, cross sectioning and carving 
idividual teeth. Correlated with lectures. For Dental Hygiene 
ents only. 
^TAL HYGIENE 103— Orientation to Fields of Dentistry 

and Dental Hygiene (2-0-2) 

historical background of the dental hygiene movement, and an 
eduction to the profession of dentistry, its fields of specializa- 
and the role of the dental hygienist, with respect to them as a 
iber of the dental health team. 

JTAL HYGIENE 104 - 105— Clinical Dental Hygiene I and II 

(1-4-3), (2-4-4) 

ures and demonstrations in the technique of removing stains 
deposits from the exposed surfaces of the teeth. Work is in- 
uced by practice on manikins. After the student has mastered 
technique she receives clinical experience in oral prophylaxes 
hildren and adults, mouth inspection and charting in the 
al hygiene clinic. 
JTAL HYGIENE 106— Pharmacology and Anesthesiology 

(2-0-2) 

study of drugs and anesthetics with special consideration 

ti to those used in the dental office. This study is to acquaint 



84 



the student with the origin of these drugs and anesthetics, thir' 
physical and chemical properties, modes of administration ^d 
effects upon the body systems. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 201— General and Oral Pathology (3-0 )• 
The principles of general pathology in relationship to the disea ^ 
of the teeth, soft tissues, and supporting structures of the < 
cavity. The importance of early recognition of abnormal cori- 
tions in the mouth by the hygienist is emphasized. j^ 

DENTAL HYGIENE— 202 - 203— Clinical Dental Hygiene III 

and IV (2-8-6), (2-8 

Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 104 and 105. A continuation of 
and 105. The hygienist further learns and applies the princij 
of preventive dental hygiene and oral prophylaxis techniques 
patients in the clinic under supervision. Conference time is u' 
for further teaching, student evaluation, discussion of comn 
problems and situations encountered in the clinical laboratory 
DENTAL HYGIENE 204— Clinical Dental Hygiene V (2-8 
Prerequisite: 202, 203, and 207 — Co-requisite 208. The stu 
continues to learn and apply the principles of preventive dei 
hygiene techniques on adult patients in the clinic under sui 
vision. Conference time covers lav^s governing dental hygi 
practice, professional ethics, areas of employment, office pn 
dures, and discussion of situations encountered in clinical labc 
tory and externship experience. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 205— Dental Health Education (2-0 

Demonstrations and practical applications of modern methods 
dental health education. Teaching techniques, visual aids, mi 
rials, and opportunities for teaching are covered. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 206— Dental Roentgenology and 

X-ray Laboratory (2-4 

A series of lectures and demonstrations on the applications 3 
roentgen rays for dental diagnostic purposes. Includes the elec1r>- 
physics of the apparatus, positioning of the films, angulatior 
the machine, and developing processes. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 207— Dental Materials and 



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Assisting Procedures (1-2 

Basic concepts of dental assisting, laboratory procedures, and c 
tal materials used commonly and the role of the dental hygien 
Field trips to local commercial dental laboratories and the k 
dental supply houses. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 208— Externship (04 

Supervised learning experiences in selected dental offices and f 
trips to local community dental agencies and specialized dental 
fices in order to amplify formal teaching. 
DENTAL HYGIENE 209— Dental Public Health and 

Preventive Dentistry (3-0 

A comprehensive overview of health programs with reference 
the needs of the community. Particular attention is given to m< 



k 



of prevention and control of dental disease, the promotion of 
aital health and opportunities for particii)ati()n by the dental 
ygienist. 
ENTAL HYGIENE 401— Practicum in Dental Hygiene 

Education I (1-8-5) 

n introductory field experience in the college dental hygiene 
inic, with emphasis on observation, individual and small group 
aching and teacher aide work. The first professional course for 
ajors in Dental Hygiene Education. 
NTAL HYGIENE 402— Practicum in Dental Hygiene 

Education II (1-8-5) 

continuation of Dental Hygiene 401. Problems common to begin- 
ng dental hygiene teachers, practices and procedures designed to 
complish program objectives, the establishment and organization 
content, methods of clinical evaluation and supervision in the 
ntal hygiene clinic. 
i:NTAL HYGIENE 403— Practicum in Dental Hygiene 

Education III (1-8-5) 

1 advanced field experience, designed to assist the student in the 
velopment of learning activities, teaching procedures and the 
esentation of materials pertinent to dental hygiene education. 
ie student will develop and teach selected units in the basic den- 
hygiene sequence. 
5NTAL HYGIENE 404— Dental Hygiene Independent Study 

(5-0-5) 

dividual independent study and field work in an area of major 
:«rest with special relevance to dental hygiene and future career 
jectives. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 
See listing under Department of Psychology and Sociology) 

ART 

(See listing under Department of Fine Arts) 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

*rofessor Leslie B. Davenport, Jr., Head ; Associate Professors 

Beltz and Thorne; Assistant Professors Brower and Whicker 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

IN BIOLOGY 

The major in biology consists of Zoology 101-102, Botany 121, 
2, and at least 40 quarter hours credit in biology courses (botany, 
)logy, etc.) numbered 300 or above. In addition, biology majors 
ist complete the course sequence in organic chemistry (15 quar- 
' hours). The course in General College Physics (15 quarter 
ars) is strongly recommended and should be considered essen- 
1 for those who expect to continue the study of biology beyond 
i B.S. degree. 

Every student acquiring a major in biology must include in 
'. program the following courses : Biology 370 ; Biology 380 ; and 
tany 380 or Zoology 390. 



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Beginning students who have successfully completed stro 
courses in biology in high school are advised to take the examii 
tion for advanced placement which are offered with the Colli 
Entrance Examinations. Arrangements to take these may 
made through the office of the Dean of Student Affairs. 

Course Offerings 

BIOLOGY 210— Microbiology (3-4-5). Summer. Prereq ps. 
sities : 10 hours of biological science with laboratory and 5 hoi jOT 
of inorganic chemistry. 

An introduction to the study of micro-organisms with prims y 
emphasis on bacteria. The morphology, life history, and pub 
health importance of representative bacteria, molds, viruses, p 
tozoa, and helminths are considered. This course is intended p 
marily for nursing students. 

BIOLOGY 351— Introductory Microbiology, I. (3-4-5). F 
Prerequisites: 10 hours of biological science, Chemistry 128-1 

A survey of micro-organisms with special emphasis on bacte 
and their relationships to man. 

BIOLOGY 352— Introductory Microbiology, II. (3-4-5). W 
ter. Prerequisite : Biology 351. 

A survey of the microscopic and macroscopic fungi comnc 
to the local grographic area. 

BIOLOGY 358— Histological Technique. (0-10-5). Prereqi'^ 
sites: Botany 121-122 or Zoology 101-102. *■ 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, secti^ 
ing, staining, and mounting plant and animal materials for stu^ 

BIOLOGY 370— Genetics (3-4-5). Winter. Prerequisites: B 
any 122 or Zoology 101-102. 

An introduction to the principles of biological inheritance. 

BIOLOGY 380— General Ecology (3-4-5). Spring. Prereq 
sites: Two upper division courses in biology (botany or zoolog; 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application 
the welfare of man, co-ordinated with a study of populations a 
communities in the field. 

BIOLOGY 410— Cellular Physiology (3-4-5). Spring. Pre 
quisites: At least third quarter junior status; two senior divis; 
courses in biology ; and organic chemistry. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between mic 
scopic anatomy and cell chemistry, emphasizing permeabil 
metabolism, and growth. 

BIOLOGY 440— Cytology (2-6-5). Fall. Prerequisite: If;?' 
senior division courses in biology. 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, growth, differff^^ti 
tiation, and reproduction. 

BIOLOGY 450 — Evolution (3-0-3). Winter. Prerequisi 
majoj* in biology (at least 15 qtr. hrs. credit in senior divis: 
courses). 

Modern concepts in organic evolution. 



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BOTANY 121— General Botany (3-4-5). Offered each quarter. 
A study of the structure of the roots, stenns, and leaves, basic 
iology and ecology of plants. Laboratory work on representa- 
. species. 
BOTANY 122— General Botany (3-4-5). Offered each quarter. 
A study of reproduction, heredity, and evolution of seed plants, 
li studies of representative species of the other major plant 
_ uips. 
BOTANY 305— Identification of Flowering Plants (0-10-5). 
ring. Prerequisite: Botany 121. 

-tudies in the identification of plants with emphasis on local 
ira. 

BOTANY 323— Plant Anatomy (0-10-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
I tany 121-122. 
Tlie origin and development of the organs and tissue systems of 
liar plants, and a comparative study of the structure of roots, 
s, leaves, flowers and fruits. 

OT ANY 380— Plant Physiology (3-4-5). Prerequisites: Bot- 
121 and 122. 
A survey of physiological processes occuring in economic plants 
1 the conditions which affect these processes. (Not offered 
37-68). 

BOTANY 425— Plant Morphology (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
tany 323. 

I Comparative studies of vascular plants with emphasis on form, 
lucture, reproduction, and evolutionary relationships. 
ENTOMOLOGY 301— Introductory Entomology I (3-4-5). Pre- 
luisites : Zoology 101-102. 

An introduction to the study of insects — their structure, identi- 
ation, and biology. 
ZOOLOGY 101— General Zoology (3-4-5). Offered each quar- 

A basic course in biological principles with emphasis upon 

imal life; includes consideration of cellular phenomena and a 

'vey of the major animal phyla. 

: ZOOLOGY 102— General Zoology (3-4-5). Offered each quar- 

. Prerequisite: Zoology 101. 

A continuation of the study of biological principles with em- 
3asis upon animal life; includes consideration of the structure 

1 function of vertebrate organ systems, reproduction, embry- 

gy, genetics, evolution, and ecology. 

ZOOLOGY ION — Human Anatomy and Physiology for Nursing 
Jidents (4-2-5). Winter. Not open to pre-professional students 

the biological sciences. 
i A basic course considering the gross anatomy, histology, and 
J y^siology of the human organ systems. 

ZOOLOGY 225— Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequi- 
: Zoology 101-102. 



A survey of the invertebrate animals, their biology, structu 
and relation to other animals. 

ZOOLOGY 226— Vertebrate Zoology (3-4-5). Prerequisil: 
Zoology 101-102. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, a"' ^ 
natural history of the vertebrate animals. 

ZOOLOGY 355— Embryology (3-4-5). Fall. Prerequisites: Zo 
ogy 101-102 or equivalent in another biological science. 

An elementary course in embryology in which the chick is usl 
to illustrate the basic principles of developmental anatomy. 

ZOOLOGY 356 — Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebral 
(3-6-6). Winter. Prerequisite: Zoology 101-102. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems 
the vertebrates. 

ZOOLOGY 357— Animal Histology (3-4-5). Prerequisites: 2| 
ology 101-102. 

A study of the tissues and their organization into organs ai 
organ systems in animals. 

ZOOLOGY 372— Parasitology (3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisite 
Zoology 101-102 and Zoology 325. 

A comparative study of the internal and external parasites 
man and other animals. 

ZOOLOGY 390— General Vertebrate Physiology (3-4-5). Pi 
requisites : Zoology 101-102 and Organic Chemistry. 

An introduction to the general physiologic processes of t 
vertebrate. 

ZOOLOGY 429— Endocrinology (3-4-5). Prerequisites: Zo< 
ogy 390 and one other senior division course in biology. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metab 
lism and reproductive cycles. 

BOTANY 

(See listing under Department of Biology) 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIOT 

Professor Orange Hall, Head; Professors Davis and Bhatia; A -fl-S) 

sociate Professor Haas; Assistant Professors DeCastro, Johi 

Morgan, and Vining. 

Major Concentrations. (For Business Education, see listiilctio 

under Teacher Education). No student will be allowed to ta) irse 

upper division courses unless he has a minimum grade of C in j tial, 

prerequisite courses in his major field. An average of at least 2§Erat( 

in his major courses will be a requirement for graduation. 

1. ACCOUNTING 

B.A. 301, 302 Intermediate Accounting I, II, and foi 

of the following: 
B.A. 329 Cost Accounting I 
B.A. 330 Cost Accounting II fl 

B.A. 436 Income Taxation I An 



B.A. 437 Income Taxation II 

B.A. 440 Accounting Systems 

B.A. 450 Auditing Principles 

B.A. 455 Advanced Accounting 
>. ECONOMICS 

Econ 401 Price and Income Theory 

Econ 435 Seminar on Contemporary Economic Prob- 
lems, and four of the following: 

Econ 326 Economic History of the United States 

Econ 335 Public Finance 

Econ 345 Economic Development 

Econ 350 Transportation Economics 

Econ 405 Government and Business 

Econ 410 International Trade 

Econ 420 Comparative Economic Systems 

Econ 422 Business Cycles 

Econ 431 Investments 

Econ 445 Independent Study 
5. MANAGEMENT-MARKETING 

B.A. 465 Business Policy, and five of the following: 

B.A. 308 Business Law II 

B.A. 315 Business Communications 

B.A. 329 or B.A. 301 Cost or Intermediate Accounting I 

B.A. 375 Personnel Administration . 

B.A. 411 Marketing Management 89 

B.A. 412 Marketing Research 

B.A. 425 Managerial Accounting 

B.A. 460 Production Planning and Control 

B.A. 462 Human Relations in Industry 

Econ. 350 Transportation Economics 

Econ. 405 Government and Business 

Psych. 320 Industrial Psychology 

Course Offerings 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 200— Survey of Business. 
5-0-5). 

A first course in business Administration majors or an elec- 
"ve for non-majors who wish to gain an understanding of the 
unctioning of business enterprises in our capitalistic system. The 
)urse will provide a basic familiarity with: (a) the economic, 
)cial, and political environment in which business enterprises 
perate, and (b) the tools and managerial skills used in business 
3cision-making in the various functional areas such as organiza- 
on, management, financing, marketing, production and person- 
al. (Not open to upper-division business majors who have al- 
5ady taken 300-level work) 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 211— Introductory Account- 
igl. (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures 



of accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, woi 
ing papers, accounting statements, controlling accounts, spec^ 
journals, partnerships and corporations. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 212— Introductory Accou 
ing II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 211. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problei 
such as departmental operations, manufacturing accounts, t ijei 
analysis of financial statements, accounting aids to manageme^ 51 tl 
statement of application of funds. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 301— Intermediate Accoui 
ing I. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Accounting theory and the solution of problems requiring 
application of accounting theory. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 302— Intermediate Accoui 
ing II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 301. 

A continuation of Business Administration 301 emphasizi: 
the theories of valuation of fixed assets and liability accounts, t 
application of these theories and the interpretation of financ; 
statements prepared on the basis of these theories. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 307— B u s i n e s s Law 
(5-0-5). 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the followi 
subjects : Contracts, offer and acceptance, consideration, rights 
third parties and discharge; agency, liabilities of principal a 
agent; negotiable instruments, elements of negotiability, endor^^^ 
ment and transfer, liabilities of parties. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 308 — Business Law 
(5-0-5). 

The law applicable to the following subjects: partnersh 
formation, powers and liabilities of partners ; corporation, form' ^'^^ 
tion, powers, rights of security holders; sales, vesting of titJ^J' 
warrants remedies. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 315— Business Communicfpi 
tions. (5-0-5). 

Principles of effective business communications, application 
these principles to business and technical report writing, corre 
pondence, and other information media. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 320 — Business Financ* 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

The internal and external sources of financing for busine 
enterprises ; acquisition and management of long-term and shorte 
term funds ; types of securities ; equity and debt instruments ; pro 
lems of financial management. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 329 — Cost Accounting 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufactufphai 
ing, including job order and process methods. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 330 — Cost Accounting 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 329. 



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standard cost procedures; budpretinp:; distribution costs and 
)ecial cost problems. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 340 — Principles of Market- 
g. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 or Eco- 
)mics 202. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods 
ul services from producers to consumers. Subject is approached 
om the functional, institutional, commodity, and integrated ana- 
tical viewpoints. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 360 — Principles of Manage- 

ent. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 or 212. 

The basic principles of management applicable to all forms 

business and to all levels of supervision; the functions of 

aiming, organizing, directing, and controlling as components of 

le management process. 

: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 375 — Personnel Administra- 

m. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 or Eco- 

)mics 201. 

Personnel administration as a staff function. Employment 
andards, training, safety and health, employee services and in- 
■ istrial relations. 

; BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 411 — Marketing Manage- 

. ent (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 340. Man- 

,. rement of marketing organizations, with emphasis on planning 

ganizing and controlling the marketing organization; internal 

id external communications ; marketing management decision- 

aking. 

; BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 412 — Marketing Research 

v)-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 340. Sampling, 

- irvey, experimental and other research techniques for determin- 

g customer preferences and market potentials. Interpretation 

ic^id presentation of research findings for management decision 

aking. 
J BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 425 — Managerial Account- 
Jig. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. Em- 
lasizes theory and practice of accounting from the standpoint of 
nliose who direct business operations and shape business policy. 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 436 — Income Taxation I. 
Ji-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 212. A study of 
^^deral income tax law and regulations; the income tax returns 
[.(I' individuals, partnerships, and corporations. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 437 — Income Taxation II. 

)-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 436 or consent 

' instructor. A continuation of Business Administration 436 with 

ti|nphasis on corporations and fiduciary returns, gift taxes, and 

.tate taxes. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 440 — Accounting Systems. 
»-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 302. The design 



and installation of appropriate accounting systems in accordant 
with the needs of the business being serviced. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 450 — Auditing Principle 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 302. The pri 
ciples of adults and financial verifications, standards of field wor. 
preparation of audit working papers, writing audit reports, an 
auditing ethics. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 455 — Advanced Accountin 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: B.A. 301 and 302. Selected problems 
accounting. Analysis and evaluation of methods used for organi 
ing and solving special accounting problems. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 460 — Production Plannir 
and Control. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 2< 
or upper-division status and consent of instructor. Appreci- 
tion of the principles of production management is develop<l 
through study of plant layout, inventory control, materials bant- 
ing, production scheduling, quality control, and associated topi(. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 462 — Human Relations i 
Industry. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 200 
upper division status and consent of instructor. A study of tl 
process of integrating people into the work situation so that thj 
are motivated to work together harmoniously, productively, a^ 
with economic, psychological and social satisfaction. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 465 — Business Poli( 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 360 or cons< 
of instructor. The formulation and application of business poli| 
by top management. Emphasis is on decision-making. 

COMMERCE 

COMMERCE 101 — Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Wini 
and Spring. 

This couse consists of introductory instruction in the technic 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper tec| 
nique and mastery of the keyboard. 

COMMERCE 102 — Beginning Typing Continued (0-5-2. F{ 
Winter and Spring. 

This course is a continuation of speed development. In additi( 
instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabluations 
given. 

COMMERCE 103 — Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Wini 
and Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 101-102 or equivalent. 

A typewTiter course in which emphasis is placed on s] 
building and accuracy. Special typing problems such as busing 
letters, minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies 
stressed. 

COMMERCE 111 — Beginning Shorthand (5-0-3). Fall. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Reading d\ 
tation and transcription from studied material. A dictation sp( 
of 65 words a minute is attained. 



11 COMMERCE 112 — Beginning Shorthand (Continued) (5-0-3). 

'inter. 

h A continuation of beginning shorthand from foundation learned 

ti fall quarter. Students entering directly into this course must 

rlj.ve a knowledge of basic brief forms and the fundamentals of 

tl(ginning Gregg shorthand. 

COMMERCE 113 — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-3). Spring. 
1; Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Stu- 
:<nt is required to take dictation at the rate of 100 words a minute. 
i: COMMERCE 201 — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter 
jd Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 103 or equivalent. 
iip Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and 
Jl^uracy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts 
itd business papers. Most of the student's work is done on a 
)|oduction timing basis. 

kI COMMERCE 202 — A continuation of Commerce 201 (0-5-2). 
ill, Winter and Spring. 

COMMERCE 203 — A continuation of Commerce 202 (0-5-2). 
nil, Winter and Spring. An average of 60 words a minute is at- 
tained. 

r. COMMERCE 211 — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-3). Fall. Pre- 
iil^iuisites : Commerce 111, 112, 113 or equivalent. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are ap- 

ifjjed in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and 

ei transcribing. Dictating and typing of mailable letters are em- 93 

iliasized. A speed of 120 words a minute for five minutes is 

': :ained. 

COMMERCE 213 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. Prere- 
lisite: Commerce 112 or equivalent or permission of instructor. 
"' Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as 
[ssible, including the instruction of various business machines, 
ifactical problems deal with typing, filing and office courtesy. 

^ ECONOMICS 

^i" ECONOMICS 201 — Principles of Economics I. (5-0-5). 

A study of the principles underlying the economic institutions 

the present time and their application to economic problems. 
jVgregative or macroeconomics is emphasized. 

ECONOMICS 202— Principles of Economics II. (5-0-5). 
^t., Microeconomics, with emphasis on the theory of prices and 
htor shares. If a student plans to take only one economics course, 
i^onomics 201 or Economics 326 would be more suitable than 
nflonomics 202. 

'^ ECONOMICS 326— Economic History of the United States. 
(0-5). 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the 

t ited States from the colonial period to the present, with em- 

is on the period since 1860, and including developments in 

iculture, industry, labor, transportation, and finance. 



ECONOMICS 327— Money and Banking. (5-0-5). Prerequise 
Economics 201. 

Monetary theory, banking theory and practice, central bil 
controls, other financial institutions, credit flows, monetary poli e 
to achieve desired economic effects. 

ECONOMICS 331 — Labor and Industrial Relations. (5-0 ) 
Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

The development and structure of the labor movement in - 
United States ; the principles of wage determination ; collective 1 
gaining; and public policy toward labor unions. 

ECONOMICS 335 — Public Finance. (5-0-5). Prerequis r 
Economics 201. 

The economic effects of governmental taxation, expenditu 
and public debt management. The principal sources of revenue 
types of expenditures at the federal, state, and local levels, 
proper scope of government and issues of fairness in taxation 

ECONOMICS 345— Economic Development. (5-0-5). Prerei, 
site: Economics 201. The nature and causes of economic sta 
tion in developing nations of the world, urgent need for t 
economic development, theory of economic growth, ways of fos" 
ing development, and balanced growth and industrialization. 

ECONOMICS 350— Transportation Economics. (5-0-5). P 
quisite: Economics 201. The economic aspects of transportat: 
significant developments in the fields of highway transport, w; 
transport, and air transport, and in regulatory policy conceniB| 
the transportation industry. 

ECONOMICS 401— Price and Income Theory. (5-0-5). Pne- 
quisite : Economics 202. Economic analysis, especially the theoiBs 
of production, price determination, factor shares, income distrij- 
tion and determination. 

ECONOMICS 405— Government and Business. (5-0-5). Pne- 
quisite: upper-division status. The effects of public policies u;»d 
business and industry, with emphasis on anti-trust, taxation, rej- 
latory, and defense policies. 

ECONOMICS 410 — International Trade. (5-0-5). Prereci- 
site: Economics 202. Export-import trade, emphasizing excha- 
techniques, balance of trade and payments accounts, and .. 
theory of international specialization and exchange, the relatii- 
ship of international transactions to national income. 

ECONOMICS 420 — Comparative Economic Systems. (5-0-£ 
Prerequisite: Economics 202. Study of economic problems un 
different economic systems such as capitalism, socialism; and 
troduction to Marxian economic theory. 

ECONOMICS 422 — Business Cycles. (5-0-5). Prerequisi 
Economics 327 or Economics 201 and consent of instructor, 
study of cycle and growth theories, causes of business fluctuatio 
means of prevention or control, policy proposals to maintain j 
employment and price stability. Problems of economic gi'owth { 
forecasting. 



ECONOMICS 431 — Investments. (5-0-5). The investment 
Lks in different investment media ; selection of appropriate media 
^accordance with individual or institutional goals and risk-bearing 

jacity. Types of investments and securities. 
^►ECONOMICS 435 — Seminar on Contemporary Economic Prob- 

•is. (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Economics 201 and 202. General 
i«)blems of production, employment and income, with special re- 
liance to the specific problems faced by the American economic 
'.tern. 
ji ECONOMICS 445— Independent Study. (5-0-5). Mature stu- 

its of economics may be permitted to undertake special inde- 
^^dent studies in one or more aspects of economics, under the 
^ervision and guidance of a member of the faculty. Normally, 
jb subject matter covered will parallel a bulletin-described course 
^.ich is only infrequently offered. The student will meet fre- 
jjintly with his advisor and will be expected to submit reports in 
j-)th on his studies. Approval of the Advisor and the Department 
dad will be necessary for admittance to this course. 

APARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS 

')fessor Fretwell G. Crider, Head; Associate Professors Brewer, 
ffj Harris, Robbins, and Stratton; Assistant Professor Hill 
^partmental Requirements for the Major in Chemistry 
'*' Qtr. Hrs. 

^j[. Major Requirements 
J A. Lower Division 
'^ General Inorganic Chemistry (128, 129) 



Analj^tic Chemistry (Qual. 28^ ; Quant. 
-^282) 



10 



10 



B. 



15 
12 
13 



Upper Division , ^' 

^ Organic Chemistry (341, 342, 343) 

^ Physical Chemistry (491, 492, 493) 

■' Electives (13 qtr. hrs.) from the following: 

Advanced Inorganic (421) 4 qtr. hrs. 
^' Qualitative Organic Analysis (448) 4 

\ qtr. h^s. 

• Instrumental Analysis (480) 5 qtr. hrs. 

Special Problems in Chemistry 

J (498, 499) 1-5 qtr. hrs.^- 

Chemistry 431, 432, 441,/' 
. Requirements in Related Fields 

A. Mathematics through Calculus 

B. Physics 

Course Offerings 
EMISTRY 

CHEMISTRY 121, 122— General Inorganic (4-3-5). 

;: Entrance Requirements. 

'This course is designed for the student who is pursuing a non- 

t;nce college major. It includes a study of the fundamental laws 



Prerequi- 





and theories of chemistry emphasizing the descriptive chemistr 
the elements and their relationships as shown in the Periodic To 
The course is a lecture and laboratory study with minimum reliac 
on mathematics. 

CHEMISTRY 128, 129— General Inorganic (4-3-5). Prenu 
site: Mathematics 9. 

A study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemi^^ 
with a quantitative approach to the subject. This course is desij 
for the science major expecting detailed work in the modern 
cept of the atom, chemical bonding and a thorough treatmei 
the chemistry of particular elements, families and groups, 
laboratory work includes an understanding of fundamental 
niques as applied to beginning experiments and a study of pr( 
ties and preparations. 

CHEMISTRY 281— Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). 
requisite: Chemistry 129. 

Theory and adequate laboratory practice in the analysis of 
mon cations and anions. 

CHEMISTRY 282 — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (2-J 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 281. 

The fundamental theories and practice of gravimetric and 
metric analysis with an introduction to instrumental analysis. 

CHEMISTRY 341, 342, 343— Organic Chemistry (3-6-5). 
requisite: Chemistry 129. 
96 I Three quarter course in the study of aliphatics, aromatic hyj 

1 carbons and their derivatives. Includes the study of polyfuncti 

compounds, polynuclear hydrocarbons, carbohydrates, amino aj 
heterocyclics and related compounds. The course will emphj 
organic reactions in terms of modern electronic theory. 

CHEMISTRY 350— Chemical Literature (2-0-2). Prerequi^ 
Chemistry 342 or consent of Department Head. 

A study of the use of the chemical library and the impoi 
journals, references and information sources. Course will in( 
instruction in report writing. 

CHEMISTRY 360— Biochemistry (5-0-5). Prerequisite: CI 
istry 343. 

A study of the chemical nature of cellular constituents 
their metabolisms. 

Chemistry 371 — Industrial Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequi,^ 
Consent of Department Head. 

This course presents a study of inorganic chemical indusi 
It deals with chemical processes and modern developments in t| 
industries. A survey of operations and economics is given. 

CHEMISTRY 372— Industrial Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequii 
Consent of Department Head. 

This course covers the important organic chemical industric 
the same manner as Chemistry 371. 

CHEMISTRY 421— Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3-3-4) 
requisite : Chemistry 282. 



^ Selected topics in inorganic chemistry tending to increase stu- 
fits' understanding of mechanisms of chemical reactions. Empha- 
jies the periodicity of elements. 

CHEMISTRY 431, 432 — Seminars (3-0-3). Prerequisites: 

eniistry 493, Chemistry 343, or Chemistry 421. 

Selected topics for group discussion. 

CHEMISTRY 441— Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). Pre- 

uisite: Chemistry 343. 

A further study of important organic reactions emphasizing 

cries of reaction mechanisms of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 448— Organic Qualitative Analysis (2-6-4). Pre- 

uisite: Chemistry 343. 

Systematic approach to the identification of organic compounds. 

CHEMISTRY 480 — Instrumental Analysis (2-9-5). Prerequi- 
:'s: Chemistry 282, 342. 

(Includes study of principles involved in the operation and the 
oratory use of special instruments for analysis. 
CHEMISTRY 491, 492, 493— Physical Chemistry (3-3-4). Pre- 

luisites: Chemistry 343, 282. Physics 213. Mathematics 104. 
Fundamental principles of physical chemistry including the 

liy of solids, liquids, gases, thermochemistry, thermodynamics 

1 solutions. The course v^ill also cover a study of chemical 
ilibria, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, colloids, quantum i — 

;hanics and nuclear chemistry. [^ 

CHEMISTRY 498, 499— Special Problems (Schedule and credit 
y). Prerequisites: Chemistry 493 and consent of Department 
d. 

iiProblems to be assigned and work directed by a member of the 
•artment. Supervised research including literature search, labo- 

jj )ry experimentation and presentation of results. Course credit 

j( depend on problem. 
CHEMISTRY 105— Chemistry for Nurses (4-3-5). 

} Principles of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry 
1 special application to nursing practice. 

' JrSICAL SCIENCE 

^^|?HYSICAL SCIENCE 111 — Physical Environment (5-0-5). 
I requisite: Entrance Requirements. 

i^n elementary survey of the fundamentals of general physics, 
fiiding mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and modern phys- 

Designed for the student who pursues a non-science major, 
course employs lectures, demonstrations, visual aids and 

>lems to assure familiarity with basic formulas and principles. 

' simple mathematics is utilized. No credit is given to a stu- 

. who has completed a course in college physics. 

'HYSICAL SCIENCE 113— Meteorology, Geology, Astronomy 

-5). Prerequisite: Entrance requirements. 



PHYSICS 

PHYSICS 211— Mechanics (4-2-5). Fall, Summer. Prerequise 
Mathematics 101. 

The first part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213 in gen -a. 
physics. Basic classical physics, including mechanics, sound, ac 
heat. Designed for non-science majors with aptitude in mare- 
matics below the level of calculus. Lectures, demonstrations, vi 
aids, problems, and laboratory work to assure familiarity \ 
fundamental laws and principles. 

PHYSICS 212 — Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light (4-2) 
Winter. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 and Physics 211. 

The second part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213. B 
electricity, magnetism, and geometrical optics. 

PHYSICS 213 — Light Phenomena, Modern Physics (4-2 
Spring. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 and Physics 212. 

The last part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213. Contiiit 
the study of light from the viewpoint of physical optics, and ^ 
eludes with the study of modern physics. Laboratory work 
sists of two selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHYSICS 217 — Mechanics (5-3-6). Fall, Summer. Prer 
site: Mathematics 104, or concurrently. 

The first part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219 in ge; 
physics. Basic classical physics, including mechanics, sound, 
I heat. Designed for science majors and engineering students. 

"°l tures, demonstrations, visual aids, problems, and laboratory 

to assure familiarity with fundamental law and principles. 

PHYSICS 218 — Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light (5 
Winter. Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 and Physics 217. 

The second part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219. M!'^ 
electricity, magnetism, and geometrical optics. 

PHYSICS 219 — Light Phenomena, Modern Physics (5- 
Spring. Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 and Physics 218. 

The last part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219. Conti 
the study of light from the viewpoint of physical optics, and 
eludes with the study of modern physics. Laboratory work 
sists of two selected experiments of advanced scope. 



U( 



CHINESE 

(See listing under Department of Foreign Language) 

COMMERCE 

(See listing under Department of Business Administratioi 

DENTAL HYGIENE 

(See listing under Department of Allied Health Services)] 

ECONOMICS 

(See listing under Department of Business Administratic 



fials 
er] 



[APARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

J Professor William W. Stokes, Head; Professor Parry; 
1 Instructor Hardee 

The purpose of the Department of Education is to co-ordinate 
|! college-wide programs of teacher education and to offer pro- 
isional courses for the pre-service and in-service preparation of 
Jchers. For specific requirements of the teacher education pro- 
mis offered by the college, see i)ages 64-71. 



Course Offerings 

^^ EDUCATION 103— Orientation to Teaching. (5-0-5). 

The study of the status of education and of teaching as a pro- 
ijsion. The student engages in directed self-study and plans for 
t! achievement of his professional goals. 
? EDUCATION 303— Orientation to Teaching. (5-0-5). 

For transfer and other students who have not had Education 
|», or the equivalent in preparation for formal admission to the 
icher education program. 

* EDUCATION 301 — Child Development and the Educative 
■»cess. (2-6-5). 

A study of the developmental learning characteristics of pupils 
1 relation to ways in which the school environment may elicit 
^'ther development. Students attend seminars on campus and 
>'ve as teacher aides in selected elementary schools. Application r^ 

S this course must be made with the Co-ordinator of Elementary | 

fucation the quarter preceding registration for the course. Pre- 
' uisite : Admission to Teacher Education. 

EDUCATION 425— The Teaching of Reading. (5-0-5). 

The teaching of reading including methods, techniques, and 
iterials. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

EDUCATION 435— Elementary School Curriculum. (5-0-5). 

The study of existing instructional programs and experiences 
]:urriculum design. Directed observation. Prerequisite: Edu. 301 
il Psy. 301, or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: Edu. 

i;. 

EDUCATION 436— Elementary School Methods. (5-0-5). 

The study and evaluation of teaching methods, materials, and 
? lipment in the various teaching fields. Actual unit development 

preparation for student teaching. Prerequisite : Edu. 301 and 
:/. 301, or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: Edu. 435. 

EDUCATION 437-440— Secondary School Curriculum and Meth- 
)u (5-0-5). 

The study of secondary school curriculum with emphasis upon 
^ terials and methods of teaching. Directed observation. Registra- 
tn is by section as indicated below: Prerequisite: Admission to 
licher Education and Psy. 301. 

I EDUCATION 437— Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, 
ineral. 



00 



EDUCATION 438— Secondary School Curriculum and Meth 
Business Education. 

EDUCATION 439— Secondary School Curriculum and Meto 
English. 

EDUCATION 440— Secondary School Curriculum and Mettd 
Social Science. 

Education 446, 447, 448 — Student Teaching. (15 qm: 
hours). 

Students are placed in selected schools for one quarter as 
time student staff members. Classroom teaching experiences 
other staff responsibilities are jointly supervised by the col 
staff and supervising teachers in the selected schools. PrereBS 
site: See Page 28- Ml 



EDUCATION COURSES OFFERED IN OTHER DEPARTME 

ART 320— Art for the Elementary Teacher. (4-2-5) . 

A study of materials and methods for teaching art at | C 
elementary school level. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher 
cation. [^ 

ENGLISH 331— Children's Literature. (5-0-5). 

The literary genres usually emphasized in elementary and 
ondary schools will be studied. The primary purpose of this coi 
will be to consider how literature may both stimulate the child 
cater to his interests as well. Secondary purposes will be the i 
sideration of critical techniques, methodology, and overall use 
ness of materials studied. Prerequisite: Admission to Teac 
Education. 

MATHEMATICS 452— Basic Ideas of Arithmetic. (5-0-5) 

This course is designed to give elementary teachers a c 
understanding of the fundamental ideas of arithmetic and to 
quaint them with the material currently being used in the ele 
tary schools. Prerequisite: Mathematics 105, and Admission 
Teacher Education. 

MUSIC 320— Music for the Elementary Teacher. (5-0-5). 

An introduction to music skills and materials for the element 
classroom teacher. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educat 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 320— Health and Physical Educal 
for the Elementary Teacher. (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the teaching of health and physical edi 
tion for the elementary teacher. Prerequisite : Admission to Tei 
er Education. 

PSYCHOLOGY 301— Educational Psychology. (5-0-5). 

The application of behavioral science to the problems of lea 
ing in the classroom. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 and Admis 
to Teacher Education. 

ENGINEERING 

(See listing under Department of Mathematics) 



.ini 






DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH & SPEECH 

•ofessor Hujrh Pendexter III, Head; Professors Anchors, Seale, 
1 Strozier; Assistant Professors Bakker, Brooks, Chew, Ramsey, 

Welsh and White. 

KPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN 

ENGLISH 
^ A student majoring in English must com] ete at least 40 hours 
. upper-division courses (300-400 level) in the major field, of 
'.fiich at least 15 hours must be on the 400 level. A major program 
liust include at least one of the starred courses in each of the fol- 
^•ing groups : 
m, Shakespeare (404*) 

ILL English Literature before 1700 (300*, 301*, 321, 402, 403) 
Jl. English Literature after 1700 (303*, 305*, 306*, 307*, 311, 
^ 312, 322) 

jV. American Literature (309*, 310*, 313, 322) 
|V. Comparative Literature or English Language (314*, 318*, 
a! 322*, 325*, 332*, 333*, 410*) 

The major shall select one area of specialization from groups 
MV and complete at least two additional courses in that area 
Ijitarred or unstarred). English 400 and 490 may, depending on 
ie subject, be counted in any area of specialization. 
i The major program must also include proficiency in a foreign 

iguage equivalent to courses 101 through 104, and 25 quarter 

urs of courses, approved by the major department, from these 
tated fields : literature in a foreign language, history, philosophy, 
it, music, speech. 

Course Offerings 
i^GLISH 

; Students will be assigned to freshman English according to re- 
mits of tests taken before the beginning of the term. 

ENGLISH 100— Fundamentals of Composition (3-4-5). (Offer- 
E only in summer.) 

This is the study and practice of sentence and paragraph struc- 
tre. Students must learn to write clearly, logically, coherently, 
id correctly. In the 2-hour reading laboratory students work to 
[prove reading comprehension. In the 2-hour writing laboratory 
hy practice in composition. 

ENGLISH 101 — Composition (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Assign- 
^mt to this course is based on entrance test results or the success- 
t completion of English 100. English 101 must be completed 
Uh a grade of ''C" in order to enter English 102. A library paper 
i written during the term. 

ENGLISH 102 — Composition & Introduction to Literature 
(0-5). Prerequisite: English 101. 

Emphasis in composition is on critical papers longer than 1,000 
« rds. Reading assignments are from classical epics and tragedy, 
Bi the Bible. 



ENGLISH 103— Honors Composition (5-0-5). , 

Instructions in this course will not follow the traditional lect 
method only ; the students will read, and write a research pa 
(or papers) in the fashion which the instructor thinks will best <> 
cipline them for independent study. 

ENGLISH 104 — Honors Composition and Introduction to Li1i 
ature (5-0-5). 

In this course the students will read material in addition to 
literature assigned for English 102 and write critical papers 
topics selected from the periods covered. 

ENGLISH 201— Masterpieces of Literature I (5-0-5). I 
requisite: English 101, English 102. Literary masterpieces fi 
1350-1835. 

ENGLISH 202— Masterpieces of Literature II (5-0-5). Pne 
quisite: English 101, English 102, English 201. Literary mas^i 
pieces 1850 to present. 
Period Courses (poetry and prose, with a slight sampling of drarr.) 

ENGLISH 300 — Early English Literature-Beginning thro 
1485 (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 301— Renaissance-1485 - 1603 (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 302— 17th Century - 1603 - 1660 (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 303— Restoration and 18th Century - 1660 - 1798 ' 
0-5). 

ENGLISH 305— 19th Century I. Romantic (5-0-5). 
■^ ENGLISH 306— 19th Century II. Victorian (5-0-5). 

—J ENGLISH 307— Twentieth Century British (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 308 — American Literature - Beginning throi^ 
Twain (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 310 — American Literature from the rise of Natuil- 
ism to the present (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 332 — Medieval and Renaissance European Literatre 
(5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 333— Modern European Literature (5-0-5). 
Genre Courses 

ENGLISH 331 — Children's Literature (will not apply towjd 
English major) (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 313— American Novel (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 314— The European Novel (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 318— Greek and Roman Drama in Translation (5t- 
5). 

ENGLISH 321 — English Drama to 1850 (excluding Shal'- 
speare) (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 322 — Modern British, American, and Continenil 
Drama, Ibsen to present (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 325 — Advanced Grammer-An objective examinatia 
of the structural patterns of modern English by application of te 
new analytic and descriptive methods. (Not a review of traditioil 
grammar.) (5-0-5). 

ENGLISH 375— The British Novel (5-0-5). 



I 

enior Courses 

f ENGLISH 400— Seminar [(l-5)-0-(l-5)] 

; ENGLISH 402— Milton (5-0-5). 

i ENGLISH 403— Chaucer (Not offered in 1968-69) (5-0-5). 

i ENGLISH 404— Shakespeare (5-0-5). 

t ENGLISH 410— History of the English LangiuiRe (5-0-5). 
ENGLISH 490— Independent Study [(l-5)-0-(l-5)] 

PEECH 
SPEECH 227— Theatre Laboratory (0-3-1). Practical experi- 

ice in theatre. The student will work on the Masquer's production 

'' the quarter. Only one hour's credit may be earned per quarter. 

he maximum total credit allowed in Theatre Laboratory is five 

larter hours. 

♦ SPEECH 228— Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5). Practice and 

^eory of oral communication. Each student makes several major 

leeches. The physiology of the speech mechanism is covered, 

' d articulation is studied within the framework of the Inter- 

^'tional Phonetic Alphabet. 
SPEECH 341 — Oral Interpretation (5-0-5). A practical course 
the oral interpretation of poetry and prose. The techniques 
literature analysis are stressed along with the vocal techniques 
eded to communicate an author's mood and meaning. 
SPEECH 345— History of the Theatre (5-0-5). A survey of 
eatrical art from its beginning to present day. The course i 

t iphasizes the development of the physical theatre. ^^ 

ENTOMOLOGY 

(See listings under Department of Biology) 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

^ofessor Harry Persse, Head; Assistant Professor McKinnell 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
MAJOR IN MUSIC 
The Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in Music 

The college offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major 
music. Within this degree program the student may choose 
concentration from the areas of performance, music literature, 
nsic theory, or music education. 

l''' In addition to satisfying the requirements of the core curricu- 
I n for the bachelor of arts degree, those majoring in music will 
niplete the following program: 

Lower division courses: Music Theory 110, 111, 112 _. 6 

Sightsinging 101, 102, 103 3 

Music Theory 210, 211, 212 6 

Sightsinging 201, 202, 203 3 

Applied Music 140, 141, 142 6 

240, 241, 242 . . 6 

30 



I 



! 



Upper division courses: Music History 310, 311 1« 

Music Theory 312, 412 i 

Applied Music 340, 341, 342 ( 

440, 441, 442 ( 

21 
Additional courses in music may be elected by the studtt 

but no more than seventy hours in the major field may be app' 

towards the degree. 

In addition to the above, the program must include fifteentc 

thirty hours of approved electives in related fields. 

Course Offerings 
ART 

ART 101— Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5). 

An introduction to the principles of design and the means 
materials of drawing. 

ART 102— Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5). 

A continuation of Art 101. 

ART 103— Basic Design and Drawing (3-4-5). 

A continuation of Art 102. 

ART 200— Art Appreciation (5-0-5). 

The study of theories of art and their application in masi 

works of art from all ages, directed towards increasing the unc 

QA I standing and enjoyment of art for the non-art major. 

I ART 201— Drawing and Painting (0-6-3). 

Drawing and painting from various figures, animals, and 
jects, employing various materials and media. 

ART 202— Drawing and Painting (0-6-3). 

A continuation of Art 201. 

ART 203— Drawing and Painting (0-6-3). 

A continuation of Art 202. 

ART 290— History of Art (5-0-5). 

A survey of world art from ancient times through the Baroq 

ART 291— History of Art (5-0-5). 

A survey of world art from the end of the seventeenth cent 
to the present. 

ART 320— Art for the Elementary Teacher (4-2-5) . 

A study of materials and methods for teaching art at 
elementary school level. 

ART 301— Ceramics (3-4-5). 

An introductory course in the fundamentals of pottery, c 
modeling, glazing and firing methods. 

ART 302— Ceramics (3-4-5). 

A continuation of Art 301 with emphasis on the potter's wh 
and the study of glaze materials. 

ART 303— Ceramics (3-4-5). 

A continuation of Art 302 with emphasis on the potter's wl 
and an introduction to elementary ceramic technology. 



Course Offerings 

MUSIC 
Theoretical Courses 



:; MUSIC 101— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Fall. 

I A study of sight singing techniques applied to diatonic ma- 

•rials. 

MUSIC 102— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Winter. 
j A continuation of Music 101. 
' MUSIC 103— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 102. 

MUSIC 110— Music Theory and Eartraining (2-1-2). Fall. An 
troduction to the basic theoretical principles of music and ear- 
aining. 
il MUSIC 111— Music Theory and Eartraining (2-1-2). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 110. 

MUSIC 112— Music Theory and Eartraining (2-1-2). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 111. 

MUSIC 201— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Fall 

A study of sight singing techniques applied to chromatic ma- 
rials. 

l; MUSIC 202— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Winter. 
'* A continuation of Music 201. 

MUSIC 203— Sight Singing (2-0-1). Spring. I 105 

A continuation of Music 202. ' 

• MUSIC 210— Music Theory and Eartraining (2-1-2). Fall. 
I A continuation of the study of music theory introducing modu- 
'fcion and chromatic material. Prerequisite: Music 112. 

MUSIC 211— Music Theory and Eartraining (2-1-2). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 210. 

MUSIC 212— Music Theory and Eartraining (2-1-2). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 211. 
' MUSIC 312— Form and Analysis (3-0-3). 

The study of the formal principles of music as exemplified in 
usical works of the various style periods. 

MUSIC 320— Music for the Elementary Teacher (5-0-5). 

An introduction to music skills and materials for the elemen- 
ry classroom teacher. 

MUSIC 350— Conducting (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the problems and techniques of conducting. 

MUSIC 411— Counterpoint (3-0-3). 

A study of the contrapuntal techniques of Renaissance music. 

MUSIC 412— 20th Century Materials (3-0-3). 

A study of the materials and techniques of 20th Century music. 

MUSIC 420, 421— Piano Pedagogy (2-0-2) (2-0-2). 

Introduction to techniques of piano instruction from the ele- 
jntary through the advanced levels. 



06 



x 



I 

MUSIC 450— Orchestration (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the techniques of scoring for instrumerai 
ensembles and the orchestra. 
History and Literature Courses 

MUSIC 200— Introduction to Music Literature (5-0-5). 

A course designed to help the student understand and en.-\ 
fine music by analysis of form, style and mediums of musisi 
expression from the great periods of musical art. Not open 
music majors. 

MUSIC 310— Music History (5-0-5). 

The history of music in Western civilization from its ori^^ 
through the Baroque period. 

Prerequisite: One year of music theory or permission of a 
instructor. 

MUSIC 311— Music History (5-0-5). 

The history of music in Western civilization from the Barodt 
period to the present. 

Prerequisite: One year of music theory or permission of le 
instructor. 

MUSIC 422— Opera Literature (3-0-3). 

A study of operatic masterpieces from the origin of the f 
to the present. 

MUSIC 490— Independent Study (1 to 5 hours). 
APPLIED MUSIC COURSES 

Applied music courses consist of one or two twenty-five min 
private lessons per week. A special fee of $24.00 for one les 
per week of $48.00 for two lessons per week per quarter is 
plicable. 

No Music major will be permitted to register for applied m 
courses for credit until he has reached an adequate level of p> 
ficiency in his instrument. The standard of such proficiency 
be set by the Fine Arts Department, and the level of achievem«] 
in the individual case will be determined by examination. 

MUSIC 130, 131, 132; 230, 231, 232; 330, 331, 332; 430, 4 
432 — Applied Music. One hour credit per quarter. One twenty-f 
minute private lesson per week. 

MUSIC 140, 141, 142; 240, 241, 242; 340, 341, 342; 440, 4 
442 — Applied Music. Two hours credit per quarter. Two twen 
five minute private lessons per week. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Professor William Easterling, Head; Professor Lubs; Instruc 
Ferguson. 

Course Offerings 

CHINESE 

CHINESE 101-102— Elementary Chinese (10-0-10). (Not 
fered 1968-69). A basic training in Chinese conversation 
reading. 



P> 

I 



etj CHINESE 201— Intermediate Chinese (5-0-5). (Not offered 
)68-69). 

CHINESE 233— Chinese Literature in Translation (5-0-5). 
Not offered in 1968-69). 

i^j *FRENCH 

4 FRENCH 101-102-103— Elementary French (15-0-15). A course 

"Ijr beginners. The approach is primarily oral, and daily practice 

ith tape recordings is required. No credit for graduation or 

•ansfer will be given until the sequence is completed. 
te FRENCH 110 (3-0-3)— 111 (3-0-3)— 112 (4-0-4) .' These are 

le same courses as French 101-102 above, but more time is 
•hewed for covering the work. Students will be enrolled for these 

ilections on advice of the instructor. 
FRENCH 201 — Intermediate French (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
^^hree quarters of college French or three years of high school 

cench. Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 
•' FRENCH 301— French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 

ranch 201. Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere and Racine. 
:J FRENCH 327— French Literature of the Nineteenth Century 
'^5-0-5). Prerequisite: French 201. A study of Romantic prose 

Detry, and drama, with lectures and discussions in French. 

*GERMAN 

, GERMAN 101-102-103— Elementary German (15-0-15). Drill 
^pon pronunciation and elements of grammar, conversation and 
jie training of the ear as well as the eye. German is used as 
luch as practicable in the classroom instruction. The course 
icludes reading of texts and translations, conversations, dicta- 
on, and dialogues. No credit for graduation is allowed until 
^quence is completed. 

GERMAN 110 (3-0-3)— 111 (3-0-3)— 112 (4-0-4). These are 
le same courses as German 101-102 above, but more time is 
(lowed for covering the work. Students will be enrolled for these 
actions on advice of the instructor. 

GERMAN 201— Intermediate German (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
hree quarters of college German or three years of high school 
-erman. Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

^SPANISH 

SPANISH 101-102-103— Elementary Spanish (15-0-15). These 
ourses are for the purpose of providing the student with the 
lements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. No 
redit for graduation will be given until sequence is completed. 

SPANISH 201— Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
hree quarters of college Spanish or three years of high school 
panish. Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 



107 



^Students who own tape machines may check copies of taped lessons out 
f the library. These tapes are recorded at TV2 i. p. s. 



FRENCH 

(See listing under Department of Foreign Languages) 

GEOGRAPHY 

(See listing under Department of History and Political Scien* 

GERMAN 

(See listing under Department of Foreign Languages) 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY & 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Roy Carroll, Head; Professors Beecher and Wu; As 
ciate Professors Coyle, Haunton, Lanier, Newman; As- 
sistant Professors Boney, Comaskey, Duncan, 
Gross, McCarthy, Patterson 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

IN HISTORY 

Students planning to major in history are urgently advi^ 
to take such courses as will satisfy the basic college requireme: 
for the Bachelor of Arts degree during the Freshman and Sop; 
more years. Those planning to continue their study of histc 
in graduate school are ad\ased to select French or German 
their language. The minimum requirement in addition to Hist* 
114 and 115 for a major in history is forty quarter hours fr^ 
history courses numbered 300 or above. In selecting courses i 
a major, the student may elect to emphasize the history of te 
United States, or the history of Europe, but he may not preset 
a major exclusively in either of these areas. 

Required courses: History 114, 115, and 300, but History 14 
and 115 may not be counted in the forty quarter hours requir 
for the major. It is the policy of the department to advise 
history majors to register for History 300 in the first quarter 
their Junior year or in the first quarter after they elect to maj 
in history. 

The major program must also include proficiency in a foreij 
language equivalent to courses 101 through 201, and 25 quart 
hours of courses, approved by the department, from these relat 
fields: History of Art and Music, Economics, Literature, Philc 
ophy. Political Science, and Sociology. 

Course Offenngs 

HISTORY 

HISTORY 114— History of Western Civilization. (5-0-5). 

A chronological survey of the main currents of political, soci; 
religious, and intellectual activity in western civilizaton from t 
time of the ancient Mediterranean civilization to 1715. 

HISTORY 115— History of Western Civilization. (5-0-5). 

A continuation of History 114 down to the present. 



HISTORY 251— American History to 1865. (5-0-5). 
A general survey of the political, economic, and social history 
, the United States to the end of the Civil War. 
^ HISTORY 252— American History Since 1865. (5-0-5). 
A general survey of the political, economic, and social history 
the United States from 1865 to the present. 
HISTORY 300— Problems in Historiography. (5-0-5). 
A study of the nature and meaning of history, some of the 
oblems involved in the writing and study of history, and selected 
terpretations. 
^ HISTORY 320— The Civilization of China and the Far East, 
irt I. (5-0-5). 

' The history of East Asian civilization from ancient times 
(rough the eighteenth century, with special emphasis on char- 
, teristic political, economic, and social developments. 

HISTORY 321— The Civilization of China and the Far East, 
rt H. (5-0-5). 
k' The history of East Asian nations from the nineteenth century 
Mil the present, with emphasis on political, social, economic, and 
tellectual developments. 

i HISTORY 322— History of Japan. (5-0-5). 
i A survey of the history of Japan, with major emphasis placed 
:o!»on the development of Japan since 1600. 
«'! HISTORY 323— History of India and South Asia. (5-0-5). 
^' A survey of the civilization of South and South-east Asia, with 
tlincipal attention given to India since 1600. 
^ HISTORY 329— History of Russia to 1917. (5-0-5). 

A survey of Russian history during the Kievan, Tartar, Mus- 
livite, and Imperial eras. 

iw HISTORY 330— Twentieth Century Russia. (5-0-5). 
^ An examination of the forces leading to the downfall of Tsarist 
I'fissia, the Bolshevik Revolution, and the political, economic, and 
ytcial history of the Soviet era. 

HISTORY 341— History of England, 1450-1690. (5-0-5). 
'If- Emphasis is given to the constitutional, religious, and economic 
^Ivelopments, but social and intellectual phases are treated. 
i^ HISTORY 343— Medieval Europe, 395-1350. (5-0-5). 
'"^ A study of Europe from the fourth to the fourteenth century, 
•th particular attention to social, economic, and religious develop- 
imts. 
HISTORY 345 — The Late Middle Ages and Renaissance. 
-0-5). 

The history of Europe from c. 1300 to 1517 with special em- 

I asis on the political, cultural, and intellectual developments 

'lich transformed medieval society into Renaissance Man. 

HISTORY 347— The French Revolution and Napoleon. (5-0-5). 

An investigation of the ideas and events of the Old Regime 

td the Enlightenment in France; emphasis is also on the impact 



of the French Revolution and the career of Napoleon upon tie 
major European nations. 

HISTORY 348— The History of Europe from 1815 to l^i 
(5-0-5). 

A study of the most important social, political, and intelleclai 
directions of European history from the Congress of Viennatr 
the end of the nineteenth century. 

HISTORY 350— Europe in the Twentieth Century. (5-0-5) 

A study of the major developments in Europe since 1900, ^^ 1 
emphasis upon the origins and impact of the First and Se 
World Wars. 

HISTORY 354— Social and Intellectual History of the Vma 
States Since 1865. (5-0-5). 

An examination of political theory, social development, and u 
principal trends of American thought since 1865. 

HISTORY 355— Studies in American Diplomacy. (5-0-5). 

Studies of American objectives and policies in foreign aff^ 
from colonial times to the present. 

HISTORY 356— American Constitutional History. (5-0-5). 

A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the Constij- 
tion of the United States. 

HISTORY 357— The Old South. (5-0-5). 

The colonial South through secession; development and opear 
tion of the plantation system ; emergence of the ante-bellum socal 
and political patterns of the region. 

HISTORY 358— The New South. (5-0-5). 

Emphasis is placed upon the social, economic, and polit 
readjustments of the late nineteenth century, and the impact 
industrialism and liberalism in the twentieth century. 

HISTORY 359— Civil War and Reconstruction. (5-0-5). 

The causes and significance of the American Civil War, 
minor consideration of the military campaigns; political, econ 
and social aspects of Reconstruction. 

HISTORY 360— Recent American History. (5-0-5). 

Beginning with the presidency of Rutherford B. Hayes, 1 
course will emphasize populism and progressivism, the period 
tween the wars, and postwar readjustment. 

HISTORY 361— Great Historians. 5 quarter hours. (5-0-5) 

The course is designed to acquaint the student with major h 
torians and historical philosophies through individual reading 
der the direction of the instructor. 

HISTORY 362— Independent Study. (5-0-5). 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual : 
search and reading in some field of history under the supervise 
of a member of the staff. Emphasis will be on wide reading, cc 
ferences with the adviser, and written reports and essays. Op 
only to seniors with a B average in history and in their over 
work. Admission will be subject to approval of the individual 
viser and of the Head of the Department of History. 



1 



I 
)GRAPHY 

GEOGRAPHY 111— World Human Geography. (5-0-5). 
\ survey of world human geography, emphasizing population 
•acteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic 
vities and geo-political problems within the major geographical 
3ns. Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expand- 
ivorld populations. 

LOSOPHY 

[PHILOSOPHY 110— Introduction to Philosophy. (5-0-5). 
The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of 
f)sophy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the 
;ion of philosophy to art, science and religion. Includes a sur- 
^of the basic issues and major types of philosophy, and shows 
• sources in experience, history and representative thinkers. 
PHILOSOPHY 301. — History of Philosophy: Ancient and 
j.eval. (5-0-5). 

in historical introduction to philosophy, tracing the develop- 
\c of European philosophy from the early Greeks through the 
[lissance. 

PHILOSOPHY 302— History of Philosophy: Modern. (5-0-5). 
L continuation of Philosophy 301 from the seventeenth century 
8e present. 
(philosophy 320— Introduction to Oriental Philosophy. (5-0- 

ITICAL SCIENCE 

partmental Requirements for the Major in Political 

Science 

I student majoring in Political Science must complete a mini- 
i of forty quarter hours of upper-division courses (300-400 
) in the major field. A major program must include Political 
ice 303 and at least one course from each of the following 
ps: 

American Political Institutions (300, 304, 305, 307) 

Comparative Governrnent (301, 302) 

International Relations (306, 319, 320) 

Political Theory (331, 332). 
I'or the remaining number of required courses, the student 
: have a reasonable distribution of courses from the four areas 
1 above. Political Science 400 (Senior Seminar) may be taken 
permission of the Department Head. 

he major program must also include proficiency in a foreign 
lage equivalent to courses 101 through 201 (French or Ger- 
is recommended for those contemplating graduate work), and 
uarter hours of courses, approved by the department, from 
5 related fields: economics, psychology, history, geography, 
sophy, sociology, and statistics. 



HJL 



uT] 



Course Offerings 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 113— Government of the United Sti 
(5-0-5). 

A study is made of the structure, theory, and functions of 
national government in the United States and some of the m 
problems of the state and local government. The course shows 
developmental practice has created our government as it stj 
today. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 300— Political Behavior. (5-0-5). 

This course emphasizes the economic, psychological, and s^ 
aspects of political behavior. It examines the concepts of po 
roles groups, elites, decision-making, political communications, 
systems analysis. Consideration is also given to the basic theo 
variables, and hypotheses used in empirical research in poli 
science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 301— Comparative Government. (5- 

An analytical and comparative study of the major Euro 
governments, with principal emphasis upon the analysis of the 
ditions which lead to effective and stable parliamentary gov 
ment, and those which lead to the inefficiency, instability 
breakdown of such systems. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 302 — Comparative Government: 
(5-0-5). 

A continuation of Political Science 301, with emphasis on 
political institutions and problems of government in Asian nat: 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 303— Introduction to Political Sci< 
(5-0-5). 

This course deals with the area of political science as a discip 
and serves as an introduction to the systematic study of mo 
government. Attention is given to the role of politics in soci 
the nature and origins of the state ; the nature and developmei 
political institutions ; the bases of political action ; and the theo 
forms and processes of government. Required of all political sci 
majors. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 304— Public Administration. (5-0-| 

This is a one quarter course that is primarily concerned 
organizational theory and bureaucratic behavior, whether publ 
private, but with an emphasis on the behavior of the bureauc 
of the national government. This course will also be concerned 
the political process as it unfolds in the administration of lawi 
acted by the Congress. A number of case studies on the sul 
will be examined in some detail. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 305 — S t a t e and Local GovernnI 
(5-0-5). 

This course is concerned primarily with the political pre 
and the behavior of political actors at the local and state leve 
government primarily in the United States. It is concerned wit? 
techniques and research results of the relevant empirical litera 



it has evolved over the past 15 years in the field; i.e., local com- 
inity studies of Floyd Hunter, Robert A. Dahl, and others. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 306— International Law. (5-0-5). 

An introduction to selected public international law topics in- 
dinir: recognition, state succession, jurisdiction, extradition, na- 
nality, the law of treaties, the law of diplomacy, and the law of 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 307— Constitutional Law. (5-0-5). 
A study of the development of the United States government 
•Qugh judicial interpretation of the Constitution. The case study 
thod of analysis is used, but some attention is given also to re- 
it behavioral writings on judicial decision-making. Prerequisite: 
itical Science 113, or equivalent. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 319— International Relations. (5-0-5). 
An introduction to the theories, forces and practices dominating 
temporary international relations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 320— International Relations: The Far 
it (5-0-5). 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 331-332— Political Theory. (5-0-5). 
An historical study of the development of ideas relative to the 
te and government from Socrates and Plato to the present. At- 
tion is directed primarily to the political thought of a selected 
up of eminent philosophers. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 331— From Socrates to the 17th Cen- 
\i (5-0-5). 

^POLITICAL SCIENCE 332 — From the 17th Century to the 
:sent. (5-0-5). 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 400— Senior Seminar. (5-0-5). 
Designed to permit superior students to pursue research and 
i,iing in some field of political science under the supervision of 
istaff . Open only to seniors with a B average in political science. 

Inission will be subject to approval of the department head. 
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 
Professor Lane Hardy, Head; Professors Sanchez-Diaz, Cocley, 
n, Laffer; Assistant Professors Semmes, Underwood, Brown, 
<le, Hansen, Gibbs. 

\11 degree programs require at least 10 hours of mathematics. 
1 requirement may be satisfied in any one of three ways: 

a) For LIBERAL ARTS MAJORS (English, history, etc.) : 
Mathematics 105 and any one of these courses: Mathe- 
matics 106, 107, 108, 109. 

b) For SOCIAL SCIENCE MAJORS (psychology, sociology, 
business administration, etc.) : Mathematics 101 and 
Mathematics 111. 

c) For SCIENCE MAJORS (physics, chemistry, mathe- 
matics, etc.) : Mathematics 103 and Mathematics 104. 

•indents should consult with the department of their major for 
Ible variations on the above options (a), (b), (c). 



Departmental Requirements for the Major in Mathematics 

A major in mathematics will consist of at least 30 quarter hoi 
beyond the calculus sequence (Mathematics 104-201-202-203). 

Every major program must include Mathematics 311-312 ;i 
at least one of these sequences: 331-332; 401-402. 

It is recommended that a mathematics major support his w 
in mathemati'cs with at least 15 qts. hrs. of approved elecl, 
courses in related fields. 

Course Offerings 
ENGINEERING 

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 113— (0-6-2). 
Topics of study include lettering (capital and lower case) ; 
use of the instruments; geometric construction; orthographic r 
jection; emphasis on descriptive geometry concepts as applied 
the solution of problems involving orthographic projection of soil 
auxiliary views, and points, lines and planes. 

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 114— (0-6-2). Prerequisite 11.-, 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving poii 

lines and planes by use of the revolution method; intersectiorli 

surfaces; warped surfaces: the development of surfaces. Practs 

applications are emphasized. 

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 115— (0-6-2). Prerequisite, IL^ 
Topics of study include sections and conventions ; dimensioni( 
pictorial representation ; detail sketches ; shop processes ; assent 
drawings from detail sketches ; working pictorial sketches ; introd 
tion to charts and graphs ; reproduction processes, ink tracing: 
cloth ; graphical calculus. 

MATHEMATICS 

MATHEMATICS 101— College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall, Win' 
Spring. 

Sets, functions and their graphs, equations, logarithm and 
ponential functions, polynomials, right triangle trigonometry, 
mentary statistics and probability. 

MATHEMATICS 103— Pre-Calculus Mathematics (5-0-5). I 
Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: SAT scores of 500 or better 
both verbal and mathematics, 8 semesters of high school ma 
matics or its equivalent (algebra 1, 2, Geometry, Trigonometi 
or a gi'ade of C or better in Mathematics 101. 

Sets, functions, graphs, real numbers, polynomial functi 
trigonometric functions, inverse functions. 

MATHEMATICS 104— Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-C 
Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: Satisfactory qualifying score on 
C.E.E.B. Achievement Test Level I or (this applies for the acad 
ic year 1968-1969 only) a satisfactory score on the Armsti 
Calculus Placement Test (given during the orientation week of 
Fall quarter — 1968 only) or a grade of C or better in Mathems 
103. " 



The real numbers (especially the completeness property), co- 
jinate systems, introduction to the integral, areas, differential 
Iculus, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. 

MATHEMATICS 105— An Introduction to Modern Mathematics 

(5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. 

This course and Mathematics 106, 107, 108, 109 are designed 

introduce the non-science major to modern mathematical con- 
}ts and to suggest an appropriate cultural setting for the subject. 

MATHEMATICS 106— An Introduction to Modern Mathematics 

Abstract Algebra. (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: 
ithematics 105 or consent of instructor. 

This course as well as Mathematics 107, 108, 109 will proceed 
the same spirit as Mathematics 105. A specific area of mathe- 
itics will be studied in an effort to acquaint the liberal arts stu- 
nt with the work of contemporary mathematicians. Appropriate 
)ics will be selected from one of the following areas: Abstract 
ebra, modern geometry, analysis, mathematics logic. 

MATHEMATICS 107— An Introduction to Modern Mathematics 

Logic (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 105 or consent of 
tructor. 

MATHEMATICS 108— An Introduction to Modern Mathematics 

Geometry (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 105 or consent 
instructor. 

MATHEMATICS 109— An Introduction to Modern Mathematics | , 

Analysis (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 105 or consent of | ' ' -^ ' 

tructor. 

MATHEMATICS 111 — Elementary Statistics (5-0-5). Fall, 
nter, Spring. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 or its equivalent. 

MATHEMATICS 201— Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 

1, Winter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104. 

The differential and integral calculus of exponential, logarith- 
i and inverse trigonometric functions, elementary differential 
lations, algebra of vectors. 

MATHEMATICS 202— Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
nter, Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. 
■Some vector analysis, analytic geometry of two and three di- 
jasions, conies, polar and cylindrical coordinates, the Mean-Value 
'^orem, Cauchy's Theorem, Taylor polynomials. 
'MATHEMATICS 203— Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
j'ing. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. 

Problems involving extrema, the theorems of L'Hopital and ap- 
[ations, infinite sequences and series. The solution of linear 

inary differential equations both by operator methods and 

es. 

MATHEMATICS 235— Finite Mathematics (5-0-5). Prerequi- 

: Mathematics 101. 

MATHEMATICS 305 — Differential Equations with Applica- 

s (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. 



MATHEMATICS 306— Fourier Series and Boundry Value 
lems with Applications (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Mathematics 

MATHEMATICS 311, 312, 313— Abstract Algebra (3-0-3). 
requisite: Mathematics 203. 

MATHEMATICS 331— Vector Analysis (5-0-5). Prerequis 
Mathematics 203. 

MATHEMATICS 332— Mathematical Statistics (5-0-5). Pr 
quisite: Mathematics 202. 

MATHEMATICS 400— Special Topics (1-5) -0- (1-5). 

MATHEMATICS 401, 402, 403 — Introductory Real Varia 
(3-0-3). Prerequisite: Mathematics 311 and consent of instruc 

MATHEMATICS 406, 407, 408, and 409 (5-0-5). 

These courses are the same as Mathematics 106, 107, 108, 
109. 

MATHEMATICS 411, 412— Complex Variables (5-0-5). Pr 
quisite: Mathematics 203. 

MATHEMATICS 431, 432, 433— Projective and Related Geo 
tries (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

MATHEMATICS 452— Basic Ideas of Arithmetic (5-0-5). 1 
requisite: Mathematics 105. 

This course is designed to give elementary teachers a clear 
derstanding of the fundamental ideas of arithmetic and to acquj 
them with the material currently being used in the element 
schools. 
Te] MATHEMATICS 490— Seminar (1-0-1). 

—J MUSIC 

(See listing under Department of Fine Arts) 
NURSING 

(See listing under Department of Allied Health Services) 
PHILOSOPHY 
(See listing under Department of History and Political Sciene- 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Roy J. Sims, Head; Assistant Professors Lawrence 
Tapp (Acting Head), fi. Alexander, G. Bedwell, and J. Scart 
ough; Instructor; B. Backus. 

During the freshman year, students should take Physical 
ucation 111 (Fall), Physical Education 112, and Physical Educat 
113 (Winter and Spring). During the sophomore year, stude 
should elect any other three Physical Education courses. Stude 
unable to participate in the regular program should plan an alt 
nate program with the head of the Department of Physical Edu 
tion. For other department regulations see "Physical Educat 
Program" under academic regulations. 

Course Offerings 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 111 — Conditioning Course (0-2-1 
Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carri' 
road work, duel combatives, and simple games. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 112— Team Sports (0-2-1). Winter. 
Consists of two from the following: basketball, field hockey, 
cer, speedball, and volleyball. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 113— Elementary Swimmin^r (0-2-1). 
1, Winter, and Spring. (Physical Education 202 or Physical Ed- 
tion 203 may be substituted for Physical Education 113. 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 114 — Officiating of Team Sports 
3-2). Fall and Winter. May be either basketball, football, or 
er appropriate team sport. Consists of a study of rules inter- 
tation and actual experience in coaching and officiating in class 
I intramural games. Elective credit, except when substituted 
Physical Education 112. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201 — Elementary Tennis (0-2-1). 
1 and Spring. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 202— Senior Life Saving Course in 
mming (0-2-1). Spring. (May be substituted for Physical 
ication 113). 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 203 — Water Safety Instructors' 
irse (1-2-1). Spring. (May be substituted for Physical Educa- 
1 113). Prerequisite: Physical Education 202 or American Red 
ss Senior Life Saving. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 204 — First Aid (3-0-1). Fall and 
iter. 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid. i 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 205— Folk Rhythms (0-2-1). Spring. HV 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 206 — Beginning Modern Dance 

>-l). Winter. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 207 — Tap D a n c e for Beginners 
M). 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 208— Golf or Other Adult Recreative 
rts (0-2-1). Fall and Spring. 

G^olf, ping-pong, pool, card games, chess, checkers, shuffleboard, 
other quiet games. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 232— Bowling (0-2-1). Winter. 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 233— Badminton (0-2-1). 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 234— Trampoline (0-2-1). 
The student is taught the proper care and use of the trampoline, 
er strict supervision he learns to perform the following skills: 
drop, knee drop, front drop, back drop, pull over, cradle, turn- 
e, swivel hips, spotting, and somersault. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 236 — Intermediate Modern Dance 
-1). Prerequisite: Physical Education 206. 
V continuation of Physical Education 206 with emphasis on 
imics, composition, and choreography. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 320— Health and Physical Education 
the Elementary School Teacher (3-2-5). Fall and Spring. 
pICAL SCIENCE 
fSee listing under Department of Chemistry and Physics) 



PHYSICS 

(See listing under Department of Chemistry and Physics) 



DEPARTMENT OF POLICE ADMINISTRATION! 

Associate Professor, W. Bryce Hill 

Course 
English 101 (or 100), and English 22 
History 251* or History 252* 
Political Science 113*, 305 
Botany 121, 122 or Chemistry 121, 12 
Physics 211, 212, or Zoology 101, IC 
Physical Education 111, 113, 203, 20. 
and two courses in defense tactics 
Psychology 201 
Sociology 201, 350, and Criminology 



Quarter Hours 

10 

5 

10 

10 

6 

5 

15 



TTsl 



61 

Quarter Hours 



Course (Police 
101: 



(5-0-5) Police Administration 

forcement 
(5-0-5) Police Administration 102: 
(5-0-5) Police Administration 103: 
(5-0-5) Police Administration 104: 
(5-0-5) Police Administration 201: 
(5-0-5) Police Administration 202: 
(5-0-5) Police Administration 203 

listics 



Science) 
Introduction to Law 

Police Patrol 
Criminal Law 
Criminal Evidence 
Police Administration 
Criminal Investigatioi 
Introduction to Crim: 



Fall 
Introduction to Law 

Enforcement 101 
English 101 or 100 
Physical Education 

111 
Political Science 113 



Criminal Law 103 
Criminology 
Physical Education: 

Defense Tactics 
Science 



First Year 

Winter 
Patrol 102 
Sociology 201 
Physical Education 

113 
History 251 or 252 



Second Year 



Spring 
Police Administral 

201 
Psychology 201 
Physical Educati( 

201 
Sociology 350 



Criminal Evidence Introduction to Cril 

104 nalistics 203 

Criminal InvestigationPolitical Science 30 

202 Physical Education 

Physical Education : 203 

Defense Tactics Speech 228 

Science 



*If one of these history courses and this political science course are exemj 
by examination in order to meet the state requirement for graduation ( 
page 47), the ten quarter hours shall be allotted to electives. 



)LICE ADMINISTRATION 101 (5-0-5). Intioduction to Law 

Enforcement. 

Survey of law enforcement — the role, histoiy and development, 
nstitutional aspects, modern police practices and the functions 
other agencies involved in the administration of criminal justice, 
ireer Orientation. 
)LICE ADMINISTRATION 102 (5-0-5). Police Patrol. 

Basic operation of the police patrol functions; the responsi- 
lities of patrol officers ; purposes, methods and types of police 
itrol. Determination of patrol beats, areas and deployment. 
3LICE ADMINISTRATION 103 (5-0-5) Criminal Law . 

The nature, sources and types of criminal law. The classifica- 
)n and analysis of crimes and criminal acts in general and the 
:amination of selected specific criminal offenses. 
3LICE ADMINISTRATION 104 (5-0-5). Criminal Evidence. 

Reviews law of arrest, search and seizure, rights and duties of 
ficers and citizens and rules of evidence. General court procedures 
;11 be discussed. 
3LICE ADMINISTRATION 201 (5-0-5). Police Administration. 

The contemporary law enforcement agency, its functions, struc- 
re and operational techniques ; implications of generalized and 
^cialized units. Principles of organizing, staffing, budgeting, 
ntrolling, coordinating, planning and research in law enforce- 
3nt. Prerequisites: P.S. 101 and P.S. 102. 
3LICE ADMINISTRATION 202 (5-0-5). Criminal Investigation. f] 19 \ 

Introduction to criminal investigation procedures including L_ __- 

eory of investigation, case preparation, interrogation, and special 
oblems in criminal investigation. 

)LICE ADMINISTRATION 203 (5-0-5). Introduction to Crimi- 
nalistics. 

The scientific aspects of criminal investigation with emphasis 
•on crime scene recording, collection and preservation of evidence 
d the examination of evidence. Advanced criminalistics are dis- 
ssed to the extent necessary to familiarize the student with the 
lice science laboratory. Prerequisite: P.S. 202. 
)LITICAL SCIENCE 
See listing under Department of History and Political Science) 

EPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY 

[ofessor Robert H. Cormack, Head; Professor Thompson; Asso- 
ciate Professor China; Assistant Professor Worthington. 
I Students who intend to major in psychology should complete 
fychology 101-102 before the end of their sophomore year. Stu- 
Ints are strongly advised to complete as many of the general ed- 
ation requirements as possible before entering their junior year. 
I. Major Field Requirements 

A. All of the following: Psychology 102, 312, 410, 411, 412 

B. Three of the following: Psychology 307, 308, 309, 319 

C. Two of the following: Psychology 303, 305, 311 



II. Related Fields 

A. Zoology 101, 102 

B. Mathematics 101, 103, or 105, 106 and 111, 325 

C. Approved electives 

Course Offerings 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANTHROPOLOGY 201— Man and His Culture (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the study of man as a cultural animal, t 
development of human societies from preliterate beginnings, t 
rise of complex social organizations with an outline study of t 
major cultures developed by man. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYCHOLOGY 101— General Psychology (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the vocabulary, concepts and methods of t 
science of behavior. Discussion and demonstrations assist in si 
veying all the areas of psychology. Psychology 101 is prerequis 
to all other courses in the department. 

PSYCHOLOGY 102 — Advanced General Psychology (4-2-i 
Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

An extension of Psychology 101. Further examination of t 

concepts introduced in Psychology 101. Experiments are design 

to acquaint the student with the techniques of behavioral analys 

120 I PSYCHOLOGY 301— Educational Psychology (5-0-5). Prei 

quisite: Psychology 101. 

The application of behavioral science to the problem of learni: 
in the classroom. Primarily for teacher preparation. 

PSYCHOLOGY 303— Social Psychology (5-0-5). Prerequisit 
Psychology 101. 

The study of the behavior of others as determinants of the \ 
havior of the individual. The cultural milieu and group pressui 
will be examined in terms of their effects on behavior. 

PSYCHOLOGY 305— Developmental Psychology (5-0-5). Pi 
requisite: Psychology 101. 

A study of the origin and development of psychological pi 
cesses. The effects of maturational, learning and social variabl 
on human behavior are examined. 

PSYCHOLOGY 307— Experimental Psychology I. Percepti 
(4-2-5). Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

An experimental-theoretical approach to the nature of perce 
tion. Special attention is given to the psychophysical methods. 

PSYCHOLOGY 308— Experimental Psychology II. Learning 
Motivation (4-2-5). Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

An examination of the methodology and theory associated wi 
the various forms of learning and their motivational concomitan* 

PSYCHOLOGY 309— Experimental Psychology III. Compai 
five & Physiological Psychology (4-2-5). Prerequisite: Psycholoi 
101 & Zoo 101-102. 



Introduction to the biolojrical bases of behavior. The structure 
d function of the nervous system are studied and related to the 
^lavior of humans and other organisms. 

PSYCHOLOGY 311— Theories of Personality (5-0-5). Prereq- 
jite: Psychology 101. 

A study of selected personality theories with emphasis on 
rmal behavior. Attention will be given to both experimental 
d clinical data. The determinants of personality structure and 
i development of personality will be examined from divergent 
ints of view. 

PSYCHOLOGY 312 — Measurement in Psychology (5-0-5). 
erequisite: Psychology 101 & Math 111. 

An examination of the theory of measurement. Reliability and 
lidity techniques are discussed using current psychological tests 

examples. 

PSYCHOLOGY 319— Animal Behavior (4-2-5). Prerequisite: 
ychology 101. 

A study of the adaptations and behaviors with which living 
jfanisms cope effectively with their environment. The labora- 
•y will provide experience in animal care, training and experi- 
jntation. 

PSYCHOLOGY 320— Industrial Psychology (5-0-5.) Prereq- 
;ite: Psychology 101. 

The applications of psychology to the problems of industry. \~\~2] 

imarily for business majors. — 

PSYCHOLOGY 321— Educational Testing (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
e: Psychology 101 or permission of the instructor. 

An introduction to the design, use, interpretation and evalua- 
n of tests for use in the classroom. Primarily for teacher prep- 
ttion. 

PSYCHOLOGY 410— History of Psychology (5-0-5). Open only 
senior psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. 
A study of the basic ideas in psychology from early animism 
modern behavioristics. Special attention is given to the philo- 
|)hical bases at various times in the history of psychology. 
'psychology 411— Senior Seminar (5-0-5). Open only to 
liior psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. 
I A reading and discussion group which will concentrate on 
9cted contemporary issues in psychology. Specific content will 
•y from year to year. 

PSYCHOLOGY 412— Senior Seminar (5-0-5). Open only to 
lior psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. 
A reading and discussion group which will concentrate on se- 
ted contemporary issues in psychology. Specific content will 
y from year to year. 

iPSYCHOLOGY 450— Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5). Open 
y by invitation of the professor. 



SOCIOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY 201— Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). 
An introduction to the concepts and methods of the science! 
human group behavior. Includes the study of socialization, t 
role of the individual in society and the major institutions a 
processes. 

SOCIOLOGY 350— Social Problems (5-0-5). Prerequisite: S' 
20L 

An examination of behavioral deviancy and social disorga 
zation in the context of sociological theory. 

SOCIOLOGY 351— Population and Problems (5-0-5). PreW 
uisite: Sociology 201. 

A study of the methods of population analysis and the facte 
involved in population change. 

SPANISH 
(See listing under Department of Foreign Languages) 

SPEECH 
(See listing under Department of English and Speech) 

ZOOLOGY 
(See listing under Department of Biology) 



22 



INDEX 



identic Advisement 53, 45-48 

idemic Regulations 41-52 

:elerated Program, High School 24-26 

counting Major Requirements 88-89 

ministration. Officers 4 

mission to Accelei*ated Program 25 

missions 19-35 

iranced Placement 22 

nsement - 53, 45-48 

led Health Services Dept. 80-85 

imni Office 61 

thropology Course 120 

plication Forms 19 

plication Requirements - 20-21 

: Courses 104 

iociate in Arts - - 76-77 

iletics - 62 

;endance Regulation 49-50 

iiting 51 

rhelor of Arts . 63-64 

!helor of Arts Requirements 63-64 

ihelor of Business Administration 72-74 

!helor of Science 63-64 

:helor of Science Requirements 63-64 

logy Courses 86 

logy Department 85-88 

logy Requirements 85-86 

any Courses 87 

siness Administration Courses 89-92 

siness Education 67-68 

endar 1-2 

jmistry Courses 95-97 

jmistry Degree Requirements 95 

imistry and Physics Department 95-98 

nese Courses 106-107 

bs 61 

nmerce Courses 92-93 

nmerce-Secretarial Programs 74 

nmission, Armstrong State College -. 14 

nmunity Services, Office 17-18 

iduct 59 

mselling Services 53 

irse Load 48 

irse Offerings, Index 79 

in's List 49 



24 



Degree Requirements, Regulations 4*^ 

Degrees Offered 6,'7 

Dental Hygiene, A.S. Degree 75-76^ 

Dentistry !» 

Dental Hygiene Courses S 

Dental Hygiene Education 7" 

Dropping Courses 

Economics Courses f> 

Economics Major Requirements *, 

Education Courses 99- 

Education Degree Requirements 64 

Education Department 99-: 

Engineering Courses 

Engineering 

English Courses 101- 

English Degree Requirements 

English Speech Department lOl- 

Entomology Courses 

Evening Classes 

Faculty 6- 

Fees - 37- 

Financial Aid 54- 

Fine Arts Department 103-1 

Foreign Students 

Forestry 

French Courses -- 1 

Geography Course - - 1 

German Courses 1 

Heads of Departments - 

Health 

History of College 16- 

Histoi-y Courses - 108-1^ 

History Degree Requirements 1^ 

History and Political Science Department 108-1! 

Honor System 41-' 

Honors . ^ 

Housing .-- ( 

Industrial Management ] 

Late Registration Fee .- i 

Law ] 

Library ] 

Management Major Requirements i 

Mathematics Courses 114-1] 

Mathematics Degree Requirements 113-11 

Mathematics Department 113-11 

Medical Technology 74-' 

Medicine ] 



usic Courses 105-106 

usic Deirree Requirements 103-104 

ursing, A. A. Degree 75, 80-81 

ursing Courses 81-82 

ursing Degree Requirements 80-81 

)tometry 16 

•ganizations 59 

ientation 54 

it of State Tuition 37 

laimacy 16 

lilosophy Courses 111 

lysical Education Courses 116-117 

lysical Education Department 116-117 

lysical Education Program 50 

lysical Science Courses 97 

lysics Courses 98 

ilice Administration, A. A. Degree 75, 118 

)lice Administration Courses 119 

►lice Administration Department 118-119 

»litical Science Courses 112-113 

»liticaJ Science Degree Requirements Ill 

obation and Dismissal 52 

{ychology Courses - 120-121 

jychology Degree Requirements - - 119-120 

jychology and Sociology Department - 119-122 

iblications - 60 

jadmission of Former Students 24 

ftfunds 39 

igents 3-4 

igistration 27 

jports and Grades 48-49 

^^idency Requirements 27-29 

iholarships 55 

fciology Courses 122 

fanish Courses 107 

aecial Students 23 

aff, Administrative 5 

udent Activity Fee 37 

^udent Government 60 

^udent Services and Activities 53-62 

iimmer on Trial 22 

^acher Education 64-66 

fansfer Applicants, Requirements 22-23 

lansient Students 24 

pterans 26-27 

Uerinary Medicine 16 

iicational Rehabilitation 27 

ithdrawal 51 

lology Courses 87-88 



K 



J 



7} 



I 








H^*'l 



»t*i** *» 



4 1 




Vi| 



>!: J^ 



■ 

Hf 

4 M 



Arpistrons 
Stdfe 



orgia 




Bulletin and General Catalogue 
of Four Year Programs 



'1 



Bulletin of 

Armstrong State College 

Savannah, Georgia 



A Four-Year College of the 
University System of Georgia 




SUMMER FALL 



I9W-I970 



WINTER SPRING 



Volume XXXIV 



Number 9 



Membership in 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



1969 CALENDAR 1969 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


1970 CALENDAR 1970 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
l%9-1970 

SUMMER QUARTER, 1969 

20 Lcost day for freshman and transfer students 
to file all papers required in the application 
for admission 
2 Last day for transient students (for Summer 
Quarter only) to file all papers required in 
the application for admission 
9 Registration 

10 Classes begin 

11 Last day to register for credit 
16 Last day to change classes 

4 Holiday 

7 Mid-term reports due 

14-17 Pre-Advisement for Fall Quarter 

6-8 Examinations 

13 Graduation 

FALL QUARTER, 1969 

2 Last day for freshman and transfer students 
to file all papers required in the application 
for admission 
22 First Faculty Meeting 
23-25 Orientation for freshmen 

29 Advisement for sophomores, juniors and 

seniors 

30 Registration for returning sophomores, jun- 

iors, and seniors 

1 Registration for all new students 

2 Classes begin 

3 Last day to register for credit 
6 Last day to enroll in any class 
6 Mid-teiTn reports due 

17-21 Pre-advisement for Winter Quarter 

24 Ga. and U.S. history and government test 

27-28 Thanksgiving Holidays 

5 Last day of class 
8-9 Reading days 

10-12 Examinations 

WINTER QUARTER, 1970 

15 Last day for freshman and transfer students 
to file all papers required in the application 
for admission 



Jan. 


2 
5 
6 


Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 


Jan. 


7 


I^st day to enroll in any class 


Feb. 


5 
16-20 


Mid-term reports due 

Pre-advisement for the Spring Quarter 


March 


6 

9-10 

11-13 


Last day of class 
Reading Days 
Examinations 



SPRING QUARTER, 1970 



March 


2 


Last day for freshman and transfer student? 
to file all papers required in the application 
for admission 




20 


Registration 




23 


Classes begin 




24 


Last day to register for credit 




25 


Last day to enroll in any class 


April 


23 


Mid-term reports due 


May 


4-8 


Pre-advisement for Summer and Fall 
Quarters 




13 


Honors Day Assembly 




22 


Last day of class 




25-26 


Reading Days 




27-29 


Examinations 


June 


2 


Graduation 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1970 



May 22 Last day for freshman and transfer students 

to file all papers required in the application 
for admission 

June 5 Last day for transient students (for Summer 

Quarter only) to file all papers required in 
the application for admission 
12 Registration 

15 Classes begin 

16 Last day to register for credit 

17 Last day to enroll in any class 
July 14 Mid-term reports due 

20-24 Pre-advisement for the Fall Quarter 

August 7 Last day of class 

10-11 Reading Days 

12-14 Examinations 



p 



FALL QUARTER, 1970 



Sept. 


2 


Last day for freshman and transfer students 
to file all papers required in the application 
for admission 




20 


First Faculty Meeting 




22-24 


Orientation 




28 


Advisement of sophomores, juniors and sen- 




29-30 


iors 
Registration 


3ct. 


1 


Classes begin 


3ct. 


2 


Last day to register for credit 




5 


Last day to enroll in any class 


^lov. 


4 


Mid-term reports due 




16-20 


Pre-advisement for the Winter Quarter 




26-27 


Thanksgiving Holidays 


Dec. 


4 


T -ast day of class 




7-8 


Reading Days 




9-11 


Examinations 



I/GOVERNING BOARD 
ADMINISTRATION and FACULTl 

Members of the Board of Regents 

H. G. PATTILLO, Chairman Decatb 

T. HIRAM STANLEY, Vice Chairman Columbu 

JACK ADAIR Atlant 

JOHN A. BELL, JR Dubli 

W. LEE BURGE Atlant 

JAMES V. CARMICHAEL Mariett 

G. L. DICKENS, JR Milledgevill 

JAMES A. DUNLAP Gainesvill. 

ROY V. HARRIS August; 

JOHN W. LANGDALE Valdost 

"4~1 WILLIAM S. MORRIS, III ; August 

' JAMES C. OWEN, JR Griffii: 

ANTON F. SOLMS, JR Savannah 

JOHN I. SPOONER Donalsonvillt' 

CAREY WILLIAMS Greensborc 



Staff of the Board of Regents 

George L. Simpson, Jr Chancelloi 

H. F. Robinson Vice Chancellor 

William L. Bowden Vice Chancellor-Services 

Mario J. Goglia Vice Chancellor-Research 

Shealy E. McCoy Vice Chancellor-Fiscal 

Affairs and Treasurer 

Henry G. Neal Executive Secretary 

James L. Carmon Assistant Vice Chancellor- 
Computing Systems 

Frank C. Dunham Director, Construction 

and Physical Plant 

Robert M. Joiner Director of Public Affairs 

Mrs. Hubert L. Harris Associate Executive Secretary 



Officers of Administration 

iENRY L. Ash MORE President 

'OSEPH I. KiLLORiN Dean of the College 

AMES T. Rogers Dean of Student Affairs 

)ONALD D. Anderson Associate Dean for 

Community Services 

^ULE RossiTER Comptroller 

lACK H. Padgett Registrar 

VIRGINIA M. Arey Admissions Officer 

OSEPH A. Buck Director of Student Activities 

.^OM Llewellyn Director of Public Information 

Heads of Departments 

1 

)0RIS Bates Allied Health Services 

iESLiE B. Davenport, Jr Biology 

)range W. Hall Business Administration 

i'RETWELL G. Crider Chemistry and Physics 

ViLLiAM W. Stokes Education 

lUGH Pendexter, III English and Speech 

I . Harry Persse Fine Arts 

ViLLiAM L. Easterling Foreign Languages 

lOY Carroll History and Political Science 

tEGiNA YOAST Librarian 

■AMES L. Semmes (Acting Head) Mathematics 

iOY J. Sims Physical Education 

Jryce Hill Police Administration 

Xarke S. Worthington Psychology and Sociology 



Administrative Staff 



liss Marjorie a. Mosley Secretary to the President 

Irs. Elizabeth H. Carter. . . .Secretary to the Dean of the College 

Irs. Virginia D. Nall Administrative Assistant to the 

Dean of Student Affairs 
Irs. Grace Watkins .... Secretary to the Dean of Student Affairs 

Irs. Doris Cole Secretary, Office of Student Affairs 

Irs. Margaret J. Sharpton Secretary to the Registrar 

Irs. Joyce Weldy Secretary to Registrar for Records 

Irs. Harriet Karlin Secretary, Admissions /Registrar 

Irs. Bertis Jones LB.M. Operator 

Iiss ViCKi Wolfe LB.M. Operator 

jIrs. Naomi Lantz Secretary to the Associate Dean for 

\ Community Services 

Irs. Eugenia Edwards Head, Circulation Department 

Irs. Shirley C. West Circulation Assistant 

Irs. Susie S. Chirbas Catalog Assistant 

Irs. Claire H. Opper Catalog Assistant 



1] 



Mrs. Hazel P. Thompson Serials Assista^ 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Salter Secretary to the Librarui 

Mrs. Corinne H. McGee Assistant to the Comptrolh 

Mrs. Becky Martin Secretary to the Comj)troll' 

Mrs. Rosemary Anglin Bookkeep* 

Mrs. Jane Holland CashU 

Mrs. Peggy B. Strong Secretary to the Departments / 

History and Political Science, ar 
Psychology and Socioloi 

Mrs. Rebecka Pattillo Secretary to the Departments ( 

Mathematics, and Physical Educatic 

Mrs. Lucile M. Williams Secretary to the Department < 

E ducat io 

Mrs. Virginia D. Willcox Administrative Assistant to th 

Director of Allied Health Departme, 

Mrs. Sharon S. Gutwein Secretary to the Departments c 

English and Speech, Foreig 
Language, and Fine Art 

Miss Betty Parker Secretary to the Department of Biolog 

Mrs. Maude E. Smith Secretary to the Department c 

Business Administratio 

Mrs. Winifred D. Johnson Secretary to the Departments o 

Chemistry and Physics, an* 
Police Administratio'} 

Richard F. Baker. Superintendent, Buildings and Ground 

Ira Ryan Assistant Superintendent, Buildings and Ground 

Thomas Nease Manager, Student Cenfe- 

Miss Elizabeth Pound Manager, Book Stort 

Mrs. Jo Weeks Campus Nurst' 

Mrs. Launa Johns Receptionist, PBX Operato: 

William E. Brown Supervisor of Mai 



The Faculty 



BILL E. ALEXANDER, A. B., Morris Harvey College; M. E., Geor- 
gia Southern College 

Athletic Director and 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

M. LORRAINE ANCHORS, A.B., M.A., Baylor University 

Professor of English 

DONALD D. ANDERSON, B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.A., 
George Peabody College; Ed. D., Aubuni University 
Associate Dean for Community Services 

HENRY L. ASHMORE, B.A.E., M.A.E., D. Ed., University of 
Florida 

President 



ROBERT L. BACKUS, A.B.A., Bockley College; A.B., Morris Har- 
vey College; M.S., Georgia Southern College 
Assistant Athletic Director 
In.'^tnictor in Physical Education 

►ARDELLA PATRICIA BALL, A.B., Fisk University; M.S.L.S., 
Atlanta University 

Assistant Professor 
Cataloger 

)ORIS W. BATES, B.S., Simmons College; M.S., Boston Univer- 
sity 

Head, Department of Allied Health Services 
Associate Professor of Nursing and Dental Hygiene 

lEORGE H. BEDWELL, B.S., Sanford University; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Alabama 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

V. ORSON BEECHER, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Georgia 

Professor of History 

^LEX D. BELTZ, B.A., M.A., Walla Walla College; B.A. of Ed., 

! Western Washington State; Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Associate Professor of Biology 

.CARYL JEAN BELTZ, B. Mus., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia; M. Mus., Lewis and Clark College 

Assistant Professor of Applied Music (Piano) 

.ARVAN K. BHATIA, B.A., M.A., Punjab University; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University 

Professor of Economics 

J. BRADFORD BLANCARD, B. Mus., Hartt College of Music; 
Principal Horn and Assistant Conductor of the Savannah Sym- 
phony Orchestra 

J Instructor in Music and Director of the Band 

:OSE MARIE BLASE, B.S. in Nursing, Mt. St. Agnes College; 

' M.S., University of Maryland 

! Instructor in Nursing 

IAD ALINE P. BONEY, A.B., Winthrop College; M. Ed., Georgia 
Southern College 

Assistant Professor of History 

OHN G. BREWER, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 



**S. KENT BROOKS, B.A., M.A., The University of Texas 
Assistant Professor of English 

*JOHN H. BROWER, B.S., University of Maine; M.S., Ph.D., Ui- 
versity of Massachusetts 

Part-Time Professor of Biology 

MOONYEAN S. BROWER, B.S., M.A., University of Massachuseti 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

HUGH R. BROWN, B.S., Xavier University; M.A.T., St. Michaei, 

College j 

Assistant Professor of English I 

JOSEPH A. BUCK, B.A., Auburn University; M.S., Florida Sta' 
University 

Director of Student Activities 

ROY CARROLL, B.A., Ouachita Baptist College; M.A., Ph.D., Vai 

derbilt University 

Head, Department of History and Political Science 
Professor of History 

*JAMES WALTER CARTER, A.B., M.A., University of Florida 
Instructor in English and Applied Music (Organ) 

FRANK E. CHEW, B.A., Georgia Southern College; M.F.A., Th 
University of Georgia I 

Assistant Professor of English 
Director, "Masquers" 

ROSS L. CLARK, B.A., Tulane University 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

BERNARD J. COMASKEY, B.A., Fordham College; M.A., Ne^ 
York University 

Assistant Professor of Histwy 

IRWIN D. COOLEY, B.S., Duke University; M.S., University o 
Florida ; Ph.D., University of Texas 

Professor of Mathematics 

FRANCIS P. COYLE, B.A., Fordham University 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 

WILLIAM E. COYLE, A.B., Emoiy University; M.A., Georgetowi 
University; Ph.D., Florida State University 
Professor of Political Science 

FRETWELL G. CRIDER, B.S., Ph.D., University of Noith Care 
lina 

Head, Department of Chemistry and Physics 
Professor of Chemistry 



BETTY C. DALLAS, B.S., West Liberty State College 
Instructor in Dental Hygiene 



A 



LESLIE B. DAVENPORT, JR., R.S., College of (Miarleston, M.S., 
Virgfinia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Head, Department of Bioloqy 
Professor of Biology 

LAMAR W. DAVIS, R.S., M.S., University of South Carolina; 
Certified Public Accountant 

Professor' of Business Administration 

WILLIAM R. DeCASTRO, B.S., Florida Southern College; M.B.A., 

jt University of Oklahoma 

■ Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

♦MARGARET ANN DORROH, B.S.N., Vanderbilt University 
Instructor in Nursing 

NANCY DUFFY, B.S., University of Iowa 

Instructor in Nursing 

JOHN DONALD DUNCAN, B.S., College of Charleston, M.A., 
University of South Carolina 

Assistant Professor of History 

*MARY LOUISE DYKES, B.S., College of St. Elizabetu 
Instructor in Nutrition (Allied Health Dept.) 

WILLIAM L. EASTERLING, B.S., Western Carolina College; 
M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of Georgia; Diplo- 
ma, Sorbonne, France 

Head, Departynent of Foreign Languages 
Professor of French and Spanish 

JOHN FINDEIS, B.S., M.S., University of Illinois 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

♦JULIAN R. FRIEDMAN, B.A., Emory University; LL.B., Uni- 
versity of Georgia ; LL.M., New York University 
Instructor in Business Administration 

IIMMIE F. GROSS, B.A., Baylor University; B.D., Southern Bap- 
tist Seminary; M.A., Auburn University 

Assistant Professor of History 

3RANGE W. HALL, B.S., Air Force Institute of Technology; 
M.B.A., Hofstra College; Ph.D., University of Florida 
Head, Department of Business Administration 
Professor of Business Administration 

ICHRISTINE HAMILTON, B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

Instructor in Nursing 

,rOHN R. HANSEN, B.S., Troy State College; M. Ed., University 
of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



? 



HENRY E. HARRIS, B.S., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technokl; 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

RICHARD HAUNTON, A.B., A.M., Indiana University; Ph. 
Emory University 

Associate Professor of History 

*TED HENKLE, Diploma, Julliard School of Music 
Instructor in Applied Music (Violin) 

RAYMOND L. HILL, B.S., United States Military Acadeir^ 
B.S.C.E., University of California; M.S.. University of Floria 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

JOHN S. HINKEL, M.S., University of Florida; Ph.D., Univer 
of South Carolina 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

♦BARBARA A. HOFER, First Flutist, Savannah Symphony C- 
chestra 

Instructor in Applied Mu^ic (Flute) 

♦PHILIP HOFFMAN, B.B.A., M.B.A., University of Georgia; Ce- 
tified Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

♦ALPHIA MILLS HUGHES, B.S.E., Arkansas State Teachers (S 
lege; M.S., Louisiana State University 
Assistant Professor 
"^Q~l Cataloger 

MARVIN V. JENKINS, B.S., M.A., University of Georgia 
Assistant Professor of English 

MAX T. JOHNS, B.B.A., M.B.A., University of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Economics ! 

JAMES L. JONES, B.A., University of Tulsa; M.A., Vanderbi 
University; Ph.D., Tulane University 

Associate Professor of English 

JOSEPH I. KILLORIN, A.B., St. John's College ; M.A., Ph.D., ' 

Columbia University 

Callaivay Professor of Literature and Philosophy 

♦DONALD E. LaBLANC, A.B., M. Ed., Mercer University 

Instructor in History 

MICHAEL A. LaBURTIS, B.B.A., University of Cincinnati 
M.B.A., Bowling Green State University 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

OSMOS LANIER, JR., B.A., LaGrange College; M.A., Auburi 
University ; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Associate Professor of History 



MARGARET S. LUBS, R. Mus., Converse College; B.A., Univer- 
sity of Georgia; M.A., Columbia University 

Professor of English and French 

JOHN C. McCarthy, jr., B.B.A., University of Miami; M.B.A., 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

►ELMO M. McCRAY, JR., B.S., M.S., University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

KENNETH P. McKINNELL, B.F.A., M.F.A., University of Geor- 

■I Assistant Professor of Art 

►CHARLES A. McMURRAY, JR., B.S., High Point College; M.A., 
University of North Carolina 

Instructor in Chemistry 

►LAWRENCE E. MAHANY, A.B., St. Mary's College; M.S., Mich- 
g igan State University 

Instructor in Police Administration 

DOROTHY M. MANNING, B.S., State University of New York 
at Buffalo ; Master of Librarianship, University of Washington 
Assistant Professor 
Cataloger 

\NNE MAYER, B.S., M.A., Columbia University 

j Assistant Professor of Nursing I n 

WILLIAM S. MEDART, A.B., M.D., Washington University 
i Professor of Biochemistry 

tOBERT E. L. MORGAN, B.B.A., M.A., Memphis State Univer- 

sity ; Certified Public Accountant 
I Associate Professor of Business Administration 

ABRAHAM R. NEIMAN, LL.B., St. John's University 
Instructor in Business Administration 

AMUEL L. NEWBERRY, JR., B.S. Ed., M. Ed., Ed. D., Univer- 
sity of Georgia 

Assistant Professor of Education 

3HN F. NEWMAN, B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., George- 
town University; Ph.D., University of Florida 
Associate Professor of Political Science 

AVID A. NOBLE, A.B., A.M., Boston University 
Assistant Professor of German 

'.OYD P. NORTON, A.B., Mercer University; B.D., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School 

Instructor in Philosophy 



•ELLIOT H. PALEFSKY, B.S., University of Georgia; Ed. IV, 
Temple University 

Instructor in Psychology 

♦JOHN M. PARR, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Engineering and Mathematics 

DOUGLAS F. PARRY, B.A., M.A., University of Utah; Ph.E 
Syracuse University 

Coordinator, Elementary Education 
Professor of Education 

ROBERT L. PATTERSON, B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan Colleg( 
M.A., University of Kentucky 

Assistant Professor of History 

JACK H. PADGETT, A.B., Wofford College; M.A., University c 
North Carolina 

Registrar 

HUGH PENDEXTER, III, A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., North 
western University ; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Head, Department of English and Speech 
Professor of English 

JAMES H. PERSSE, B.F.A., University of Georgia; M.M., D. Mus 
Florida State University 

Head, Department of Fine Arts 
12 Professor of Music 

ROBERT L PHILLIPS, D.M.D., Harvard School of Dental Medi 
cine 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 

ALLEN L. PINGEL, B.A., M.A.T., University of North Carolina" 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

♦MARY MARGARET RALSTON, A.B., Florida State University 
M.S.W., Tulane University ' 

Instructor in Sociology 

VIRGINIA RAMSEY, A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A.T., Emory 
University 

Assistant Professor of English 

♦JOCELYN S. REITER, B. Mus., Eastman School of Music; M. 
Mus., University of Nebraska 

Instructor in Applied Music (Voice) 

PAUL E. BOBBINS, B.S., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 
Georgia Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 



JAMES T. ROGERS, B.S.. Delti\ SUte College; Va\. D., P^lorida 
State University 

Dcayi of Student Affairs 

JULE C. ROSSITER, A.A., Armstrong State College 

Comptroller 

♦ANDREW J. RYAN, III, LL.B., Mercer University 
Instructor in Police Administration 

RAFAEL SANCHEZ-DIAZ, B.S., University of Puerto Rico; M.A., 
University of Texas, Ph.D., University of California 
Professor of Mathematics 

SYLVIA ANN SANDERS, B.S., University of Tennessee 
Instructor in Physical Education 

JOHN L. SAUNDERS, B.A., University of Arkansas; M.S., M.A., 
University of Notre Dame 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

LEA LESLIE SEALE, B.A., University of Southwestern Louis- 
iana; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
Professor of English 

JAMES L. SEMMES, B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.S., 
Florida State University 

Acting Head, Department of Mathematics 
\ Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

JOE C. SHEFFIELD, B.S. Ed., M. Ed., Georgia Southern College 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

♦DON L. SILHACEK, B.Sc, M.Sc, University of Nebraska; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin 

Part-time Professor of Chemistry 

♦LEE N. SIMMONS, A.B., Vassar College 

Instrtictor in English 

ROY J. SIMS, B.S., David Lipscomb College; M.S., University of 
Tennessee 

Head, Department of Physical Education 
Professor of Physical Education 

>VILLIAM W. STOKES, B.A. Ed., M. Ed., Ed. D., University of 
Florida 

Head, Department of Education 
Professor of Education 

]EDRIC STRATTON, B.Sc, Nottingham University, England; 
Ph.D., Birkbeck College, London, England 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 



13 



ROBERT I. STROZIER, A.B., University of Georgia; M.A., Ph.D 
Florida State University 

Professor of English 

CAROL HELEN SUTTON, B.S.N., University of South Carolina 

Instructor in Nursing 

RUTH E. SWINSON, B.S. in Ed, Georgia Southern College; M.A 
in Library Science, George Peabody College of Teachers 
Assistant Professor 
Reference Librarian 

**LAWRENCE M. TAPP, B.S, M.S, University of Tennessee 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

DOROTHY M. THOMPSON, A.B, Monmouth College; M.A, North 
western University; Certificate in Psychiatric Social Work 
Western Reserve University 

Professor of Psychology 

FRANCIS M. THORNE, HI, B.S, Stetson University; Ph.D, Uni- 
versity of Georgia 

Associate Professor of Biology 

JEAN W. VINING, B.S., University of Georgia; M. Ed, Georgia 
Southern College 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

PAUL E. WARD, B.S., Georgia Teachers College; M. Ed, Ed. D, 
— -— I University of Georgia 

•"•^ Assistant Professor of Education 

Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences 

*N. HARVEY WEITZ, B.B.A., LL.B., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Business Administration 

JOHN A. WELSH, HI, A.B., Davidson College; M.A, Vanderbilt 
University 

Assistant Professor of English 
CHARLES C. WHITE, B.S., East Carolina College; M.A., Southern 
Illinois University 

Assistant Professor of English 

♦FLOYD T. WILLIAMS, B.S., Georgia Southern College; Principal 
Clarinetist, Savannah Symphony Orchestra 

Instructor in Applied Music (Clarinet) 

WILLIAM S. WINN, B.D., A.B, Emoiy University; M.A., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

Professor of Mathematics 

CLARKE S. WORTHINGTON, B.A., University of Arizona; M.A, 
Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., Emory University 
Head, Department of Psychology 
Professor of Psychology 



K. C. WU, B.A., Grinnell College; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton Univer- 
sity 

Professor of History and Political Science 

REGINA M. YOAST, B.A., Texas Christian University; B.S. in 

I Library Science, Columbia University 
Associate Professor 
Head Librarian 



♦Part-time Instructor 
•♦On leave of absence 



Armstrong College Commission 



The Commission controls certain endo\vment and scholarship funds. 

DR. IRVING VICTOR, Chairman Qs^ 

MR. EDWARD BARTLETT 

MRS. ARCHIE HERMAN 

MR. JOHN A. PETERS, JR. 

MR. JOHN RANITZ, JR. 

MR. HARRY SWICORD 

Ex-Officio 

DR. THORD MARSHALL 
ROBERT F. LOVETT, The Honorable 
J. CURTIS LEWIS, JR., The Honorable 
MRS. CLARENCE B. REINSCHMIDT 
MR. HERMAN DIRECTOR 



>■ 2 /PURPOSES AND PROGRAMS 

It is the puiiDOse of Armstrong State College to 
furnish students with a basic understanding of the in- 
tellectual structure of civilized life and to provide some 
of the knowledge and experience necessary to enable 
them to become responsible contributors to their civiliza- 
tion. 

The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science de- 
grees and the core curriculum of all programs are di- 
rected primarily toward the development of attitudes 
and habits of mind leading toward intellectual and 
emotional maturity of the individual while providing a 
foundation of knowledge with orientation for future 
learning. Fundamental concepts of natural phenomena 
and their interactions are provided by study in the 
physical and biological sciences. The behavior of man 
r7~~| is explored in the social sciences. The humanities deal 

I with man's experience of life in nature and society 

through the study of his mental and spiritual creations : 
language, art, history, philosophy, and religion. 

In addition to these programs, the complex profes- 
sional resources of the college make it the center of pro- 
fessional programs, such as those in elementary and 
secondary education, business administration, nursing, 
dental hygiene, and police administration, which require 
a sound academic training as well as the development of 
professional skills. 

No college degree program can provide the total edu- 
cation of an individual; all persons must continue to 
learn throughout their lives or suffer intellectual 
atrophy. The college therefore also becomes the natural 
center for the creation of numerous programs, often 
through short non-credit courses and institutes, which 
apply the college's resources to the many problems aris- 
ing in a large urban community and to satisfying the 
desire of its citizens for continuing education. In this 
sense the educational role of this college is truly multi- 
purpose. 



FOl R-YEAK DKGKKKS 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of history, English, 
music, political science, and psychology. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, chem- 
istry, and mathematics. 

Bachelor of Business Administration in the fields of 
accounting, management, and economics. 

(Each of these above degrees may be taken along 
with an approved program leading to certification for 
secondary school teaching.) 

Bachelor of Science in Education — Speech Correc- 
tion 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education. 

TWO YEAR DEGREES 

Associate in Arts. This degree is offered as prepara- 
tion for higher degrees in the liberal arts and profes- 
sions and for positions in business after two years of 
college. The student planning to transfer from Arm- 
strong State College into a professional or academic ma- 
jor program not offered here should, at the beginning 
of his freshman year, consult the catalog requirements 

of the school he plans to attend. Armstrong State Col- 

lege offers the first year of programs in forestry and 17 

veterinary medicine ; the first two years of programs in 
engineering, industrial management, physical education, 
physics, pharmacy; the first three years, or the entire 
pre-professional programs, in dentistry, law, medicine, 
optometry, and other fields. 

Associate in Arts in Nursing. This degree prepares 
graduates for the state examination for licensure as 
registered nurses. 

Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene. 

Associate in Arts in Police Administration. 

HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 

Armstrong State College was founded on May 27, 
1935, as Armstrong Junior College, by the Mayor and 
Alderman of the City of Savannah to meet a long felt 
need for a college in the community. The College was 
housed in the Armstrong Building, a gift to the city 
from the family of George F. Armstrong, and over the 
years built or acquired five more buildings in the neigh- 
borhood of Forsyth Park and Monterey Square. 

The Col